DVD+R data burns & File Systems

I’ve read that DVDs “usually” use the UDF file system and that DVDs “contain a file system, called UDF, which is an extension of the ISO 9660.”
I don’t know if that means that DVDs have an inherent ability to utilize UDF that CDs lack, if "proper "DVD burns should be done in UDF or something else I haven’t thought of.

My burning software, Nero Burning Rom from Nero 6 Ultra ed, does allow the choice of “DVD UDF” or “DVD UDF/ISO” in the Compilation Properties Window/Wizard/Whatever, but “DVD ISO” is the default. [I can’t imagine how “DVD UDF/ISO” would work unless it allows the other settings to determine which file system is used]

The UDF file system seems to me to be radically different rather than “an extension” of the ISO9660 [+Joliet+etc] file system and I’ve usually seen them classified as 2 different file systems. I would expect it to matter kind of a lot which I chose to get the best results when burning a lot of data multisession DVDs.

UDF is always explained in terms of packet writing and the ability to decrease mutisession overhead so you can write a greater number of smaller sessions and to allow CDRWs/DVDRWs to be mounted as “drives”. I know there is more to UDF than that - OS independent w/ a “redesigned” directory structure - but nothing I know about UDF or about DVDs explains why I’d use it for a burn once or multisession data DVD and I’d think ISO9660 w/ DAO would be used to burn movies to DVD.

My understanding of a CD multisession burn is that it records in TAO, altho it might burn several tracks per session. DVDs have Titles rather than Tracks. I thought they were functionally sort of equivalent and a DVD multisession did its own version of TAO. Packet writing doesn’t seem to offer any advantage here, but maybe the “redesigned directory structure” does. Does anyone know if choosing UDF when doing a multisession DVD lets you fit more on the disc or increases the reliability of the burn?

I know [or I’ve read] that DVDs have significant differences compared to CDs [and even DVD+R to DVD-R], but other than the smaller pits, narrower tracks and different laser I haven’t found an explanation of those differences or any information on whether some software handles those differences better than others. Maybe Nero’s default should be “DVD UDF”

The option to ‘finalize the disc’ is greyed out for DVD’s in Nero’s Compilation Properties Window/Wizard/Whatever. I haven’t had any problem accessing files on my multisession DVDs, but I want to be prepared for when my current computer equipment hits its planned obsolescence and I’m concerned that I can’t finalize a DVD. The days of backing up to CD are long gone.

If anyone can provide some links to articles or discussions about optimal software utilization of DVD specs I’d appreciate it.

[QUOTE=AnnieMS;2453228]UDF is always explained in terms of packet writing and the ability to decrease mutisession overhead so you can write a greater number of smaller sessions and to allow CDRWs/DVDRWs to be mounted as “drives”. I know there is more to UDF than that - OS independent w/ a “redesigned” directory structure - but nothing I know about UDF or about DVDs explains why I’d use it for a burn once or multisession data DVD and I’d think ISO9660 w/ DAO would be used to burn movies to DVD. [/quote] UDF was designed for more overall compatibility, not caring what kind of hardware or operating system is used. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Disk_Format

My understanding of a CD multisession burn is that it records in TAO, altho it might burn several tracks per session.
Yup

DVDs have Titles rather than Tracks. I thought they were functionally sort of equivalent and a DVD multisession did its own version of TAO.
I’m not sure, but i don’t think the DVD schematic is that much comparable with the CD schematic.

Packet writing doesn’t seem to offer any advantage here, but maybe the “redesigned directory structure” does. Does anyone know if choosing UDF when doing a multisession DVD lets you fit more on the disc or increases the reliability of the burn?
Packet Writing generally sucks. You should never have use for it. UDF doesn’t give you more free data. I do believe it’s even less due to the additional data locations.

If anyone can provide some links to articles or discussions about optimal software utilization of DVD specs I’d appreciate it.
Spend some time on Wikipedia or read some CDFreaks main articles.

Thank you Mr. Belvedere for your thoughtful response to my long post about UDF & DVDs. Sorry I took so long to respond. I haven’t figured out a good way to keep track of my posts and I forgot posting the question even tho I was still looking for answers. I just found the “find all threads started” in my profile page :doh: and will try to remember to use it in the future as soon as I log in.

It was reading Wikipedia’s articles and MyCE articles that got me so confused. Not really. [Is there a “Just Joking” smiley?]
I had read Wikipedia’s articles on optical media & authoring/writing and other online resources, including MyCE, prior to posting my questions - that’s where the questions came from. I haven’t been able to put together what I’ve read from different sources - some of which seem to contradict each other - yet. I’m not entirely joking when I say the more I read the more confused I get.

I’ve done some more reading at CDBurnerXP [directed there by Whappo re another question] and they recommend choosing ISO/Joliet/UDF + level 2 or 3 routinely to increase compatibility [if I understood correctly]. I thought one chose ISO9660 [U]or[/U] UDF [like you can’t choose FAT and NTFS] and didn’t understand Nero’s DVD UDF/ISO option. The fact that one can apparently write a DVD w/ both ISO & UDF gives me a better idea how file systems for optical media differ from HDs.

I don’t intend to use packet writing/drag & drop as my main backup method, but I live on the southeast coast and we have a lot of thunderstorms - more appropriately called lightning storms. I routinely unplug at night & whenever there’s a storm, but I’ve already had one computer fried when I fell asleep at the computer and didn’t hear the storm start [fortunately I didn’t get fried]. Having a CD or DVD “floppy” where I can simply drag over files as I work on them and eject the media when I’m done would be helpful if the pc industry would ever get its act together and make these options and standards truly available to the peasant pc user. We peasants need a union or a revolution and a smiley for “rant”.

For your particular uses, you might want to consider a portable flash drive for these backups. 4 or 8 gb drives are relatively inexpensive these days.

Most problems with lightning hitting is that everything that can conduct electricity (coffe machine, telephone, wiring, wall sockets, etc) will get a HUGE SPIKE (300000 volts or more) on the net. Most equipment is protected for some spikes, but not for these high voltages.

The best advice i can give you is to get two things:

  • A really good qualified surge protector installed between wall socket and your precious electronic equipment. Qualified systems are not cheap! Don’t get them at the local Target or something unless you’re sure they come with warranty! Or check apc.com for more information. Someone who’s very good with Radio Shack electronics and soldering can make you one, but no warranty :slight_smile:

  • A really good backup battery unit. Also caleld a UPS. In case of a power failure your system(s) will have about 15 minutes of time to normally shut down. You can also check apc.com for more information (no i do not have apc shares :slight_smile: )

Oh, for some an awesome movie about a lightning disaster and insurance problems with it check out “The Man Who Sued God” :slight_smile:

Your best bet is to wait until you have enough data allocated for a true DVD burn of 3-4GB. In the meantime, for temp backups, consider a 4GB thumb drive.

A similar question about DVD burn formatting (for DVD-Video, rather than data, however) was asked and answered over at http://www.digitalfaq.com/forum/showthread.php/why-iso-1849.html
Reading that may help you better understand. It gives a good answer without throwing tons of technical jargon at you.

Yeah lordsmurf [love the name]. I think that is a good idea. Maybe after-xmas sales. The size per $ of USB thumbs has changed since I first tried to write to a DVDRAM or get drag & drop to DVDRW to work and it’s fast and reliable and I won’t have a lot of discs stacking up. I haven’t had any problem w/ the “safely remove hardware” releasing thumb drives, so I can “eject” quickly. The only down is I have to read thumb drive reviews.