DVD + or -?

Just wondering, which type of DVD R, if either, do most CdFreaks prefer. And if you prefer one kind, why?

Personally, I’m a +R fan, the ability to hax the book type of burned disks, plus the widely accepted (on wikipedia at least) better error control of the +R type, makes it seem to be just “better.”

That said, if there’s something I need that only exists in a -R flavour (like a small amount of 2nd generation Tayio Yuden that I could only get as TYG02 instead of YUDENT002) I can be tempted to go with that. But after seeing some extremely good Quality Scans of Verbatim MCC/AZO DVD+Rs (with Lightscribe as an added bonus), I don’t think I’ll bother hunting for YUDENT002 anymore.

Thus, my vote must be for DVD+R

I don’t really care anymore, but almost all my burned stuff is on -R because I only had a -R burner till March 2007.

I prefer + media. I don’t have any specific reason for it, but cheap +R media are almost always better than -R ones.

I’m mainly a +R person, because that’s what my burners seem to prefer. Nothing to do with bitsetting, as my old Philips player will play +R without the need for it.

There are a select couple of -R MIDs I’ll use though.

+R, mostly from tradition [first purchases were SONY D11 +R, RITEKG05 -R, and CMC MAG AE1 -R; SONY D11 impressed me the most]. Except for buying Verbatim, I automatically reach for DVD+R first for any brand, then get the -R should I like the +R. It’s become a habit. :iagree:

Main DVD-R I’ll use without issue is RITEKF1, MCC 03RG20, SONY16D1, and MCC 02RG20. Otherwise, I’m generally kinda hard on -R.

Exception to the +R rule, Verbatim, has good media in its MCC 004 and MCC 003, but the -R counterparts just burn better for me thus far, and I had easier access to MCC 03/02RG20 than MCC 004/003 when I decided to buy Verbatim.

I had to vote for Don’t care because both seem to burn just fine for me. :iagree:

i think DVD+R in general is overall best and seems to be more of a standard than -R is nowadays.

plus with the bit-setting that +R offers which makes it better in some cases.

p.s. as far as i can tell both burn roughly the same for me on my burner… but for the bitsetting i would rather have dvd+r in general especially if there about the same on cost.

Is there really any use left for bitsetting these days? :confused:
I can’t remember the last time I met a player that won’t read a properly written DVDR (would it be plus or dash).

Back to topic: I really don’t care plus or dash as long as it works OK for me. But I’ll agree that with cheaper media, plus seems to be less tricky than dash.

I think (think) I remember that Dakhaas once explained that as +R is cheaper to manufacture than -R, cutting corners on costs could cause -R to be more “sloppily” made in some cases.

But see what happens with 16X CMC for instance, the -R model being apparently less variable and problematic than the +R one… so things are definitly not simple, thus I’d say, beware of hasty generalizations:bigsmile:

I personally don’t care. I don’t even look @ +R or -R. All I care about is the write quality and longevity of the discs.

If both are of high quality, there is no difference and if you think having +R gives you some kind of advantage than you don’t know what you’re talking about. Bitsetting is an overrated myth as far as I’m concerned. It’s never made a difference for me and never will.

I use both. +R for Video. -R for Data.

Bitsetting is not a myth - it is very real. The drives/players that need bitsetting are mostly older drives, however.

DVD+R has some advantages over DVD-R when doing multi-session burning, and DVD+RW has a significant advantage over DVD-RW for multi-session burning. In fact, DVD+RW is the only DVD format (besides DVD-RAM) I would recommend for multi-session burning.

For me, DVD+R seems to give better results for most of the comparable +/- media I would use:

+R better than -R:
MCC 004 better than MCC 03RG20
YUDEN000 T03 better than TYG03 (more compatible with picky DVD players)
YUDEN000 T02 better than TYG02
CMC MAG E01 better than CMC MAG. AE1 (more compatible with picky DVD players)

DVD+RW is faster than DVD-RW (8x vs 6x)

-R better than +R:
MCC 02RG20 and MCC 003 are rougly equal for me, but only MCC 02RG20 is still available as Archival Grade, Hard Coat Protection, MediDisc
CMC MAG. AM3 better than CMC MAG M01

So all in all I use +R(W) significantly more than -R(W).

Well I call it myth (not because I think it is) but more so because who the heck insists on using ancient players these days? Players that old might not/wouldn’t even have component input, HDMI or any kind of worthwhile connections on the back for higher quality picture, just the usual Red, White and Yellow connection. They wouldn’t have divx playback or anything cool like that either. Might not even have 5.1 sound etc.

Also, too many people are thinking that bitsetting makes the disc easier to read for the player, like as in better quality burns. As far as I know, all it does is trick the player into thinking it’s a DVD-ROM. It’s not doing to lower PIE/PIF or change any aspect of the burning to prevent skipping/playback issues.

With those two points made, I think it’s justified in this day and age to label bitsetting as sort of a myth, when it comes to making a better burn. For DVD+RW or DL though, I think it’s useful as some players might reject the disc if they read it as a DL+R or DVD+RW format.

Bitsetting is not about better burns. It’s about making players/readers read a DVD+R/RW disc that they would otherwise refuse to read.

If you have such a drive/player, then bitsetting doesn’t improve the quality - it is the difference between being able to read/play the disc and NOT being able to read/play the disc. It’s that simple.

Since I sometimes have to read data DVDs in unknown computers, I consider bitsetting important. My previous laptop computer would refuse to read DVD+R (booktype DVD+R), DVD+RW (booktype DVD+RW) and DVD-RW, but it would read DVD-R, DVD+R (booktype DVD-ROM) and DVD+RW (booktype DVD-ROM), so bitsetting made the difference between a disc being usable or unusable.

If you don’t have the need to read/play DVDs in such drives, then good for you, but things are not mythical just because they are not important to you. :wink:

I forget the details, but isn’t there something with -R recording the serial no. of your burner (for the paranoid among us)?

I mostly use [I]plus[/I], but will happily get [I]dash[/I] if the price is right or for rarity value or maybe just to try them out. Could be because my first burner only did +R/RW (LiteOn 401S). :slight_smile:

DVD+R works best for me.

Mr.Bill :iagree:

[QUOTE=cd pirate;2064389]Well I call it myth (not because I think it is) but more so because who the heck insists on using ancient players these days? Players that old might not/wouldn’t even have component input, HDMI or any kind of worthwhile connections on the back for higher quality picture, just the usual Red, White and Yellow connection. They wouldn’t have divx playback or anything cool like that either. Might not even have 5.1 sound etc.[/QUOTE]

Haha, you just pretty much described my trusty old Philips. Which I keep around for the moment for two reasons: 1. It plays nearly everything I throw at it (except CMC +R media (!) and burned DL discs, but I don’t use the latter anyway), and 2. I don’t have the funds right now to replace it.

So two reasons why I keep this fairly old player around. But as mentioned I still don’t need bitsetting :cool:

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2064391]My previous laptop computer would refuse to read DVD+R (booktype DVD+R), DVD+RW (booktype DVD+RW) and DVD-RW, but it would read DVD-R, DVD+R (booktype DVD-ROM) and DVD+RW (booktype DVD-ROM), so bitsetting made the difference between a disc being usable or unusable.[/QUOTE]

Just to add another point of view, and i real experience.

My LG home dvd player simply refuse to read +rw media that are booktype to dvd-rom, so i never use booktype with +RW media.

DVD+R is a little more consistent in general, and tends to burn with lower PIE.

DVD-R is more compatible, and will work in any burner or player. Even my ancient 2x Pioneer DVR-104 can burn 16x DVD-R, and it burns it well.

DVD-R is actually even more compatible than bitset DVD+R. There are old players that are not fooled by bitsetting, and still won’t play a DVD+R. There is nothing on the planet that won’t play a DVD-R. The advantage of DVD+R bitsetting over DVD-R is a myth. Bitsetting only helps DVD+R catch up with DVD-R in terms of compatibility, but it doesn’t cause it to pass it.

Last and most important, there are exceptions to the +R is better than -R generalization. SONY16D1 (-R) tends to be better than SONYD21 (+R). Many have found TYG03 (-R) to be better than YUDEN000 T03 (+R). CMC MAG AM3 (-R) is without a doubt better than CMC MAG M01 (+R). And MCC 03RG20 can be as good as or better than MCC 004, depending on the burner and who you talk to.

[QUOTE=negritude;2064416]DVD+R seems to be a little more consistent in general, and tends to burn with lower PIE.

DVD-R is more compatible, and will work in any burner or player. For example, even my ancient 2x Pioneer DVR-104 can burn 16x DVD-R, and it burns it well.

DVD-R is actually even more compatible than bitset DVD+R. There are old players that are not fooled by bitsetting, and still won’t play a DVD+R. There is nothing on the planet that won’t play a DVD-R. The advantage of DVD+R bitsetting over DVD-R is a myth. Bitsetting only helps DVD+R catch up with DVD-R in terms of compatibility, but it doesn’t cause it to pass it.[/QUOTE]

100% agree.

My first PS2 console didnt play any DVD+R, no matter what bitsetting. DVD-R was fine.
And my XBox 1 barely reads any +R (some MCCs, no Yuden) but every -R I throw in it.

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2064391]Bitsetting is not about better burns. It’s about making players/readers read a DVD+R disc that they would otherwise refuse to read.

If you have such a drive/player, then bitsetting doesn’t improve the quality - it is the difference between being able to read/play the disc and NOT being able to read/play the disc. It’s that simple.[/QUOTE]

That’s what I thought :iagree:

However I believe there’s a fairly large amount of people who think it has mythical abilities to prevent skipping/playback issues. If it’s set to DVD+R and reads half the time and skips etc. Bitsetting won’t make a difference to it’s playback. Bitsetting would only affect discs that simply refuse to play at all only because they refuse to read anything with a -+ format.

Since I sometimes have to read data DVDs in unknown computers, I consider bitsetting important. My previous laptop computer would refuse to read DVD+R (booktype DVD+R), DVD+RW (booktype DVD+RW) and DVD-RW, but it would read DVD-R, DVD+R (booktype DVD-ROM) and DVD+RW (booktype DVD-ROM), so bitsetting made the difference between a disc being usable and unusable.

If you don’t have the need to read/play DVDs in such drives, then good for you, but things are not mythical just because they are not important to you. :wink:

Well, you make a fair point there but I did say it was only mythical when it comes to making a better burn. Of course by better burn I mean quality wise, which plenty of people are probably completely confused about with bitsetting. Bitsetting is only useful when things won’t play, and that’s not very often for myself and most users. So if it’s only useful for say 3-5% out of all people who might encounter problems, it’s pretty useless in general IMO. It’s not like bitsetting affects a vast amount of people. It is GOOD to have it available though :iagree:

EDIT: looks like negritude is on the same page as me. I’ve also never had -R not play and then have a +R bitset work fine. Some early model PS2s would not play +R very well, but -R never had problems, even shitty princo would work.