DVD - Acetone

vbimport

#1

Hi,
I dropped acetone(nail polish remover) on one of my DVD’s which had my senior thesis on it. Is there any possible imaginable way to retrieve any info. from the DVD.

Thanks much,

Shirin


#2

@ smusmani,

Welcome to the Forum.

Acetone is a strong volatile solvent that can quickly damage susceptible plastics.

You can attempt to use IsoPuzzle (http://www.geocities.com/marsoupilamis/DocEnglish.htm) and see if this software program might to helpful in retrieving the data from your damaged DVD.

Regards,
bjkg


#3

I’m assuming the recording side (side that gets burnt) has become murky and not shiny anymore, or something like that?

Best way to retrieve the data is to somehow buff the disc shiny again. A hand held tool of some sort would work with a buffing wheel attached or something.

Got any pics of how bad the damage is?


#4

If all else fails try buffing with toothpaste


#5

It would indeed help if you’d explain exactly the damage done! I can only imagine it as acetone melts plastics, but the actual severity is impossible to guess!

If it’s only a surface damage, and if toothpaste surfacing fails, try a professional re-surfacing service. In some areas you can even buy a CD/DVD re-surfacing hand tool, they don’t come very cheap but for your thesis I guess you’re kinda motivated.

Just a hint for next time: NEVER leave important data on a single medium only, ALWAYS use [I]at least[/I] TWO media (HD + DVD, CD + DVD, HD + USBpen, etc…) - and when archiving, always make at least TWO copies on different media makes.


#6

I have attached a picture. Is it a lost case?
Thanks.





#7

Holy cow. What a mess.

Your only hope would be to polish out the damaged area, but the odds of doing that successfully are pretty small. You would have to start with something like 320 grit sandpaper and work your way through finer grits until you could use a plastic polisher and get it back to full clarity.

This would be a product you could use as the last step: http://www.meguiars.com/?clear-plastic-care/PlastX-Clear-Plastic-Cleaner-Polish

The pictures are at an odd angle…did it warp the disk at all? If so, then no hope. Personally I think it is a lost cause anyway.


#8

[B]@smusmani:[/B] please keep all your questions in the same thread.

One merged from the Newbie forum.


#9

I spot warping.
Seriously this is mission impossible.


#10

[QUOTE=dakhaas;2051433]I spot warping.
Seriously this is mission impossible.[/QUOTE]Looking at the pics, I’m of the same opinion. :frowning:


#11

There’s no way on earth anything on those discs will be recovered.


#12

They are totally destroyed, throw them away and don’t waste your time


#13

I hope you kept other copies of your work :eek:

Other than a couple of CDs where the dye lifted off the polycarbonate, these are the worst pictures of optical media destruction I have ever seen!

Those discs are finished. :sad:


#14

let these pictures be a warning to you all never trust to one type of media it always ends in tears…


#15

dude…


#16

Why does it look as if the reflective layer isn’t protected by a layer of polycarbonate (as with CDs)?

Are these really DVDs (I would say so because of the purple dye)?


#17

[QUOTE=theSpam;2052144]Why does it look as if the reflective layer isn’t protected by a layer of polycarbonate (as with CDs)?

Are these really DVDs (I would say so because of the purple dye)?[/QUOTE]Here’s how I see it:

  1. First picture is a view from above, we see the top of the discs. It already looks like the discs are warped and damaged. The colour makes me think these are either TDK or Samsung Plexomax discs.

  2. Third picture is a view from below, we see the bottom of the discs. The bottom polycarbonate layer is split from the rest of the disc in many places, from the heavy warping. It’s also been melt in some places, and damaged on almost all of the surface.

Now my problem is the second picture, the disc on the left. I can’t make heads or tails of what I’m seeing there. :confused:


#18

Backing shit up is a pet peeve of mine, ritualistic, do it too and you’ll never have to worry.:wink:


#19

[QUOTE=bennybjorn;2051828]let these pictures be a warning to you all never trust to one type of media it always ends in tears…[/QUOTE]True. :iagree:

I’ll be my own parrot again:

Without making at least two (or more) archival sets on different media stored in different places, one’s archives are not a lot more safe on good optical media than on lousy optical media.

We like to discuss climatic stability a lot around here, and God knows I’m anal about that, but all the other ways a disc can be destroyed are countless and too easily forgot.

For important/sensitive regular backups, or for archives you really want to keep: TWO sets. TWO places. Always. NEVER rely on a single set. :cry:


#20

OMG!!! :eek: those two discs are SUBAR = Screwed Up Beyond All Repair :doh: :sad: