Dual OS (Win7 64 Ultimate & XP)

vbimport

#1

ok, so here is my situation. i just rebuilt my home computer with Win7 64bit. my main purpose for this rig is editing vids and images. and so far it rocks, with one exception (so far).

My work deals with videos being recorded in a certain codec (from the 90’s apparently). So, needless to say, i cant load it in my 64bit system in order to view these recorded videos. The manufacturer says im $#it out of luck on my win7 64bit rig and need xp (at most) in order to edit them (as i still do on my work computer).

So, what i am thinking. is loading XP and Win7 64bit on my home computer in a dual boot setup. But, ive never had to do this so im a little lost. Ive read a little on it and some say install 1 over the other, some say the opposite. Can someone here layout CLEAR instructions on how to do this?

Im unsure on a few things in particular. Such as, if im running off of 1 hard drive, i need to partition it at least twice right? 1 for each OS? but i know win7 pre partitions before install (extra 100gb partition). how do i take that into account? do i then need to install programs into both partitions if i want to be able to use them regardless of which way i boot up? in other words, if xp is on c: and win7 is on d:, do i need to install cs3 into both hard drives for them to be usable whenever i want?

i know some programs work in both xp and win7, but i know for a fact that some of my current programs do NOT work in win7 already. so i DO need xp. Like i said, im a little lost (maybe more than a little). Thanks in advance for any help!


#2

Before you get too far into this dual boot situation, tell us which version of Win7 64 bit you are using. If you have Win 7 Professional, Enterprise or Ultimate, you can use Windows XP Mode instead of having to do a dual boot.

This won’t work with Win7 Home Premium or Win 7 Starter editions.


#3

Good Morning!
@Kerry56

I think uronmy49311 said in the title of his thread that he uses Windows 7 Ultimate. So I think you’re absolutely right in that he could use XP Mode and avoid the hassle of a dual-boot.

Jim


#4

:doh: Teach me to post so late at night! Can’t even read the title.

Anyway, XP mode would be a simpler solution.


#5

Yes, Windows XP Mode with Virtual PC is a free download for Windows 7 Ultimate (well, three downloads actually). I’m using it myself for some important legacy software and hardware I need to use.

XP Mode installs in a “virtual harddrive” (one or a few big files on your C drive, depending on settings), and can read and write the same folders and files as your Windows 7 installation - unless you decide to restrict access to only a subset of the drives available in Windows 7.

Performance is not a problem for me in my setup, but I cannot say how fast your video editing tools will work in your setup.

In my experience, dual/multi-boot setups are a big pain and not nearly as useful as virtual machine software such as VMware or Virtual PC.


#6

I have a dual-boot with Windows XP Home and Window 7. I put each on a seperate drive only because if one drive fails I’d still have the other. The only problem I personally have is that in order to switch from one to the other, I have to restart the computer. I figure it’s a minor annoyance and one I can live with. Anyway, I primarily use Windows 7 since most of the time I’m using the computer for video and music. I like the Media Center in Windows7.


#7

i thought about xp mode, but havnt really looked into it too much since it sounded like a half ass way to do it. so the xp mode will allow me to install codecs too then? i talked to the manufacturer again today about using the codec in 32bit win7 as well and they said it probably wouldnt work since its such an outdated codec but hasnt been tested. and like someone mentioned, will xp mode kill performance of video and photo editing?

why does dual boot not work as well as a virtual pc? seems like it would work better just be more of a hassle. i dont mind the rebooting to load a new os if performance is going to be better.

so back to my original questions, if i decide to go dual boot, Im unsure on a few things in particular. Such as, if im running off of 1 hard drive, i need to partition it at least twice right? 1 for each OS? but i know win7 pre partitions before install (extra 100gb partition). how do i take that into account?[B] do i then need to install programs into both partitions[/B] if i want to be able to use them regardless of which way i boot up? in other words, if xp is on c: and win7 is on d: (or vice versa), do i need to install cs3 into both hard drives for them to be usable whenever i want?

just trying to figure out my best option for best performance… thanks again for everyones help.


#8

This article may help with some of your questions if you still want to dual-boot.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/182145/dualboot_with_windows_7.html

Jim


#9

[QUOTE=uronmy49311;2530247]why does dual boot not work as well as a virtual pc? seems like it would work better just be more of a hassle. i dont mind the rebooting to load a new os if performance is going to be better. [/QUOTE] The major drawback of dual-booting instead of using Virtual PC, VMware or other virtualization software is, that you have to reboot every time you need to switch from one OS to the other.

This gets really tedious if you have to use both operating systems often, e.g running your video tools in Windows XP and running your email program in Windows 7.

Using virtualization on the other hand, means that you can run two or more operating systems at the same time. The major drawback is that some things (not all things) will run slower than when using the physical machine directly.

If you dual-boot, you’ll probably end up installing a lot of programs on both operating systems, which takes time and disk space and perhaps also requires multiple software licenses.

There are other advantages and drawbacks, but those are the most important ones.


#10

ok, so i run dual boot, i DO need to install programs on both partitions then? that was pretty much the thing i didnt know if i needed to do. the rebooting doesnt really bother me and i would mostly be using win7 and only drop back to xp when i needed a few capabilities. since it’d be video editing and page layout, performance is key.

so to sum it up, i need to install programs on both partitions, and performance would be better if i stick with dual boot?

any issues with bios or anything “under the hood” that im not taking into consideration?

thanks again for the help!


#11

Ok,
I understand you still want to do a dual-boot because of the performance issues. Yes you would have to load programs onto both partitions; however, you could also keep the partition you’ll be using for the video editing (XP??) trimmed down and only load the programs that you’ll need (i.e. the OS, your video editing software, and any other software necessary for the tasks you’ll be performing.)

Since I’m too cheap to buy Windows7 Ultimate, I also dual-boot with XP but I also had a spare drive laying around and was able to load XP on a separate drive. And I have that drive trimmed down to just what I need. (some video editing S/W and some games that I couldn’t get to run on W7). W7 is my primary OS on a separate drive.
At least if one of my drives croaks, I still have the other as a backup.
Again, if you haven’t already, you may want to check out the article I posted a link to in an earlier post.

Good luck and have fun!
Jim


#12

perfect. thanks.

1 more question tho…

Does it matter which OS i install first (if im starting from scratch)? Ive read both, that it DOES matter and also that it DOESNT. still confused on that end.

Thanks again.


#13

From what I’ve read, and from previous experience double booting XP and Vista, I’d say install XP first. Win7 will recognize the XP installation, and give you the option to install in a separate partition.


#14

thats what i figured… looks like its time to back up again and reinstall everything… thanks for everyones help!


#15

ok… new question/problem… i put winxp on one of my old ide hard drives… seems to work when its the only one hooked up. Same with my new hard drive with win 7. but when they are all hooked up, it automatically boots directly to winxp. it doesnt give me the os choice option. the only way i can then boot into win7 is to hit “f12” (or whatever one it was) to get the boot screen. is this right? ive read that i am supposed to get a screen that asks me which one i want to boot to automatically? could it be because i installed xp after win7? would it matter if they are on 2 entirely separate hard drives? thanks again in advance!


#16

Hi uronmy49311,

When doing a dual-boot, if memory serves me, you always install the “older” os first.

Now the way I did mine was this:

I have two similar HD on one IDE cable setting the jumpers on the drives for “cable select”. I plugged the XP drive into the slave end (usually the end) of the cable and the new (Windows 7) drive into the master (usually the middle) connector. When I installed Windows7 on the new drive, it set up the boot loader automatically. It also set the default os as W7.

That’s using two separate IDE drives. I’m certain you could do it with two SATA drives, but not sure if you could use a SATA and an IDE drive. I’m sure it’s possible, I just haven’t tried it.

Hope this helps.

Jim


#17

ok. i thought maybe that was it (installing xp second). but i thought it only mattered if it was on the same drive different partition. id hate to reformat EVERYTHING just to still not work tho. can anyone else confirm?
my current set up is win7 (installed first) on a sata drive, Winxp (installed second) on a ide drive.
thanks in advance!


#18

You might want to look at this guide: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/8057-dual-boot-installation-windows-7-xp.html

I’d wipe the Win7 installation by formatting that drive within XP, then reboot and reinstall from the Win7 disk. Win7 installation should see the XP operating system and set up the boot manager to allow you to select either operating system.


#19

i also read this morning about putting my Win7 disc in my drive and going thru setup again and choosing “startup Repair”. apparently this could also work. anyone know anything about this? I wont be able to try it until i get home, but im almost leaning towards just reformatting everything and starting again form scratch. thoughts?


#20

You could try using the disc and doing a “start-up repair”; however, I believe most of the articles I’ve read (CNET and PCWORLD, et al ) recommend doing a clean install. Since you probably don’t have a bunch of stuff on the Windows 7 drive yet, I’d also recommend a “clean” install. Much easier and less frustrating.