Dropbox users lose files due to bug – can you trust a cloud service with your files?

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Dropbox users lose files due to bug – can you trust a cloud service with your files?[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2011/05/dropbox.jpg[/newsimage]

An unknown amount of Dropbox users has lost files due to an bug in the desktop application of the cloud storage service. Affected users were those using an older version of the desktop app with the feature Selective Sync changed.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/dropbox-users-lose-files-due-to-bug-can-you-trust-a-cloud-service-with-your-files-73094](http://www.myce.com/news/dropbox-users-lose-files-due-to-bug-can-you-trust-a-cloud-service-with-your-files-73094)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

[QUOTE=DoMiN8ToR;2738784]can you trust a cloud service with your files?[/QUOTE]I wouldn’t :slight_smile:


#3

It all depends on how important the files are and how much storage I actually can allocate to them.


#4

Here’s how I do it sync with dropbox and then delete the file that is how I use my dropbox is for transfer not for storage. Everyone using cloud should know this by now but seems like some don’t. It’s temporary storage you should have more then one way to save your files. Cloud is akin to lack of forethought nothing online is secure or safe.


#5

can you trust a cloud service with your files?

Well you get what you pay plus what you agree for. Most Dropbox users pay almost nothing and agree to a lot of things not in their best interest. Kinda gets you a negative balance :slight_smile:

I do trust my own personal locally at hosted at home Owncloud with some very replacable things though. I did not pay anything and i did not agree to anything, so that’s evenly balanced. :bigsmile:


#6

If you have important data, always keep backup copies somewhere other than the cloud. You can’t trust the cloud and further than you can throw it.

Also, unless you are uploading files intended for the public, I would suggest encrypting your files before you upload them, so as to prevent the storage provider from snooping.


#7

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2738816]I would suggest encrypting your files before you upload them[/QUOTE]Another thing Dropbox can’t do. You cannot use client-side encryption. You will need additional encryption methods in order to get some client-side encryption.

Oh and forget about creating a big huge TrueCrypt or other volume (big huge encrypted file) for Dropbox. It will not allow a single big huge file to be uploaded.


#8

Data theory tells us that <1/4 of all data is “Unique data”

And data theorists are constantly telling us that we need to reduce the redundancy
to increase total available storage space

My question has always been WHY? making more data space has been cheaper than even the minimum human hours (time) to selectively eliminate the redundancy, even IF (not a certainty) reducing that redundancy is possible
(simply not proven that it is)

Personally I keep multiple copies of everything, because HDD volume
at $0.20/Gb (assuming a 1tb drive for $50US shipped) makes worrying about it pointless

So someone tell me, other than using the cloud temporarily for mass transfer, and in that case a 1tb portable drive at<$60US is insufficient, so it won’t do it for you, what exactly IS the point of the cloud, other than giving people a chance to steal or examine your data?

Someone explain it to me… I recommend using short sentences and small words.

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#9

Convenience, buzz words, Trojan horse.


#10

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2738854]Data theory tells us that <1/4 of all data is “Unique data”

So someone tell me, other than using the cloud temporarily for mass transfer, and in that case a 1tb portable drive at<$60US is insufficient, so it won’t do it for you, what exactly IS the point of the cloud, other than giving people a chance to steal or examine your data?[/QUOTE]

Very easy access from any device by anybody, but you and only you authorize who accesses that data.

You will also immediately realise that the major flaw here is “very easy” combined with “perfect authorization”. This is why they always get hacked, because most users are either stupid or just don’t care about procedures. Or both.

Examples:

I use my cloud to give grandma some pictures of the grandkids so she can view those on her tablet. Grandma has a read only account. In the very predictable outcome that her tablet gets hacked (read: she forgot it somewhere and someone abuses it), some evil hacker has reading access to some 2nd copy pictures of my kids.

Easy: Easy as hell for the user
Risk: Pictures of my kids floating around on the internet or everywhere
Procedure to reduce that risk: I am the only one who decides which pictures are shared, nobody else. Routine cleanup on the shared links. This is about as safe as emailing pictures.

I also use my cloud to give my wife a method to transfer pictures from her smartphone to her laptop. She has a 2GB writing account. In the very predictable outome that her phone gets hacked (read: she forgot it somewhere and someone abuses it), some evil hacker can put a maximum of 2GB of junk on her cloud account. This is about as safe as having full acess to a 2GB email box.

Easy: Easy as hell for the user
Risk: 2GB of very evil data on my cloud.
Procedure to reduce that risk: Routine checkups on the account.