DRAM prices to grow due to Elpida bankruptcy filing

vbimport

#1

DRAM prices to grow due to Elpida bankruptcy filing.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2012/03/MbI7S4.jpg[/newsimage]Chip maker Elpida's bankruptcy could potentially decrease dynamic random access memory (DRAM) supply and boost prices, according to new research from IHS. The company bowed to $5.6 billion in debt last week after a government bailout and competitor buyouts failed to materialize.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/dram-prices-to-grow-due-to-elpida-bankruptcy-filing-59790/](http://www.myce.com/news/dram-prices-to-grow-due-to-elpida-bankruptcy-filing-59790/)


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#2

I bought Elpida ram once, and returned it because it couldn’t work at the rated speed in any of three different motherboards, without serious tweaking, and caused one off them to not even post.

No great loss there, methinks.

I can only guess that others had similar bad experiences, otherwise they might have had a dependable market


#3

Companies may TRY to charge more for memory, but there is a down(bust) cycle currently going on for the PC industry as a whole so amid higher prices for hard drives and few and far between price cuts for processors, the 3rd shoe to drop is higher dram prices. Consumers will cut back and hold onto the equipment they have for longer. The obsolescence cycle just got extended an extra year thanks to production problems for hard drives. What the industry doesn’t understand is that dram companies go billions of dollars in debt because there is lackluster demand for it’s products. Innovation while nice, doesn’t answer the problems of a 5-10 year window for PC replenishment. That leads to boom-bust years for selling product. Asian manufacturers need to consolidate to survive the bust years. I’m usually not for that, but the realities of the global market make this a necessity. Just don’t let these companies get too greedy and gouge consumers because there are fewer comapnies making products. If anything, new companies are emerging that will try to make flash chips since that is an expanding market. Some might try their hand at dram… maybe companies should try to make a universal product that woks like volatile ram,only it can act as non-volitile states as well even with the higher speeds and be as compact as SD cards.


#4

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2625580]companies should try to make a universal product that woks like volatile ram,only it can act as non-volitile states as well even with the higher speeds and be as compact as SD cards.[/QUOTE]
If there was a technology which could, they’d already be there.

  • high speed
  • nonvolatile
  • high density (capacity)
  • low power
  • Low cost
    Pick any 4, that’s what we have now in our pc’s.

#5

There are new styles of memory currently in testing stage that work similarly to re-writable blu ray media that have the potential to replace both memories (volatile & non-volatile) which exceed current records for efficiency & versatility. However, the PC industry has a bunch of stalwarts who pride themselves on not fundamentally changing certain ways a computer works. and what kinds makes up the fundamental “bones” of a system and silicon substrates are a tried and true product. RAM has to meet stringent standards for data integrity and speed. That’s why innovation has been slowing rather than maintaining traditional innovation curves (moore’s law). There are fools that argue that moore’s law never stopped meeting it’s bell curve of innovation or has taken any pause since the birth of the x86 processor.