DRAM and NAND flash memory to be replaced by MRAM within 5 years

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: DRAM and NAND flash memory to be replaced by MRAM within 5 years[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2013/11/myce-mram-95x75.png[/newsimage]
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Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/dram-and-nand-flash-memory-to-be-replaced-by-mram-within-5-years-69670/

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#2

Twenty years ago, it was RAMBUS that was promising “all new, all better, all faster” with a host of companies lining up behind the Intel-supported conclusions. Then in 1997 and 1998, after huge new-construction projects were deep underway and so much venture capital was flowing to chase the RAMBUS dream, the faults were discovered (uncovered / revealed / confessed to) and some folks blame that for the Boom Dot Bust crunch that soon rippled across the world’s financial markets.

That was a memory-processing plan, however. This is more of a materiels issue.

It’s the twenty year cycle that raises the curious head.


#3

“Another interesting feature is that it’s non-volatile which means the data isn’t gone when a system containing MRAM is powered down.”

The absolute LAST thing we need for a DRAM replacement!
Ever wondered why Computers come with a “Reset” switch and if worse comes to worse a “Power Cord”? When either are used the corrupt data, Malware, Virus, etc. currently in RAM is flushed when the machine powers down.
Without some system for INSTANTLY flushing the MRAM is developed our machines will either be in a constant state of infection or in a permanent state of the "Blue Screen of Death"
If this is used as a replacement for the horribly small, expensive and unreliable SSDs that the technojunkies are currently drooling over, great. As a replacement for DRAM not likely.


#4

[QUOTE=olddancer;2710762]“Another interesting feature is that it’s non-volatile which means the data isn’t gone when a system containing MRAM is powered down.”

The absolute LAST thing we need for a DRAM replacement!
Ever wondered why Computers come with a “Reset” switch and if worse comes to worse a “Power Cord”? When either are used the corrupt data, Malware, Virus, etc. currently in RAM is flushed when the machine powers down.
Without some system for INSTANTLY flushing the MRAM is developed our machines will either be in a constant state of infection or in a permanent state of the “Blue Screen of Death”[/QUOTE]

Just based on memory designs of the past decades, I doubt there will be no way to do a quick memory flush upon soft or hard reboot/reset. It’s probable that the non-volatile nature comes into play only because people place their computers and other devices in low-power sleep/standby modes, and such a memory design would benefit power consumption in standby mode (while avoiding the long waits of resuming from something like hibernation/deep sleep).


#5

Old Dancer has me thinking, what a great way to sell more RAM. Maybe it will be like disposable contacts.

“In order to refresh your RAM, send it back to us and we’ll send you another set. All for the low, low price of…”

Of course, some case designs would need modifying. Maybe we could take the BANANAS style case designs…

“RAM must be changed every hour. To check, RAM will now be worn on the outside!”

Of course, I’m not too certain what happens when RAM turns 16. Hmmm…


#6

30 years ago we had core memory (MRAM) already - I don’t think it’s replacing anything but will have its spot in the market since it’s non volatile ram.


#7

My idea is that taking the Nikkei article at face value is rather risky if you are an investor in memory technology.

Nothing on the article mentions any specific advantage or production plan, nothing on sample demonstration, with no published road map.

The article even mentions something about Samsung and concludes that something with “90% of the global market” is favoring MRAM. Exactly how many technologies developed by Samsung Electronics at the moment are there as alternatives to the current specifications of the fourth-generation DDR-SDRAM and NAND? What can “a few dozen researchers” at one of the tens of thousands of memory-related research facilities around the world achieve by beginning “development” in February 2014? Some researchers gather around a professor named Tetsuo Endoh at Tohoku University in 2014 and replace DRAM and NAND by 2018? Hitachi, the mother firm of Renesas and Hitachi-LG (the firm that made most of the highly reliable DVD recording drives) is surely one of the giants in such technologies with more than US$100 billion to back up annually. It also invented IPS. But how much of Hitachi is committed to MRAM?


#8

Let 'em have their dreams - MRAM clearly has its limits and can’t “hold the water” compared to DRAM et all.

While energy efficiency is better for sure (non volatile bits) the gate timing in magneto is a real problem let alone sticky bits.

I guess they need to reinvent the wheel again to get the idea?