Doubts optical media

vbimport

#1

1 What is the temperature and humidity recommended for all optical disc manufacturers of DVD + R for long-term storage?

2 for 3 days I used a digital hygrometer to measure humidity and temperature in the compartment where they are the dvdr discs

the temperature ranges from 29.6 ° C ~ 35 C ° and the humidity ranges from 39% ~ 61%

with this data which estimated useful lifetime for my DVD + R?


#2

[QUOTE=retrogamer15;2765805]1 What is the temperature and humidity recommended for all optical disc manufacturers of DVD + R for long-term storage?

2 for 3 days I used a digital hygrometer to measure humidity and temperature in the compartment where they are the dvdr discs

the temperature ranges from 29.6 ° C ~ 35 C ° and the humidity ranges from 39% ~ 61%

with this data which estimated useful lifetime for my DVD + R?[/QUOTE]
When you by the media they do give a storage instructions on the packaging. If you read that it will tell you what kinda storage environment it should be kept in.


#3

The ideas “optical disc” and “long term” may not be a good mix. If losing one would be a disaster, consider other options for storage or multiple different media types.


#4

[QUOTE=CDan;2765868]The ideas “optical disc” and “long term” may not be a good mix. If losing one would be a disaster, consider other options for storage or multiple different media types.[/QUOTE]

Fully agreed!:iagree:
A few days ago,I had to throw away a 6-7 years old TDK CD-R80 52x because of cd-rot…:Z
And yes,it was stored away in a jewel case in a dark drawer…no direct light influence…:cool:


#5

[QUOTE=retrogamer15;2765805]1 What is the temperature and humidity recommended for all optical disc manufacturers of DVD + R for long-term storage?

2 for 3 days I used a digital hygrometer to measure humidity and temperature in the compartment where they are the dvdr discs

the temperature ranges from 29.6 ° C ~ 35 C ° and the humidity ranges from 39% ~ 61%

with this data which estimated useful lifetime for my DVD + R?[/QUOTE]

Humidity and temperature are not the only things affecting lifespan of optical discs. The quality of the original materials used in manufacture, the quality and speed of the burn, and proper handling and protection of the reading side of the disc also come into play. Deterioration of the reflective coating can also cause issues.

So, you cannot narrow down the possible issues to just humidity and heat. UV radiation is another destructive element, though you’d have to expose the discs to sunlight for quite a while.

That said, I’d prefer not to store discs in any area that regularly reaches 35 C °. Twenty-five to thirty should be ok.

I have many CD’s from 1999-2001 era that are still perfectly readable. I recently weeded out a bunch of those, all Taiyo Yuden discs. And I have many examples of DVD’s from 2003 that are perfectly fine also, but I always bought high quality discs, like Taiyo Yuden, Verbatim and Japanese made Maxell.

The oldest Blu-ray I possess only go back to 2008 or so, but still holding together well. The Ritek discs went bad in three or four years, but the Verbatim and FTI discs are fine.


#6

I have no condition to store DVD discs in temperature 25-30 degrees because the city where I live has average of 35 to 37 degrees of temperature and humidity between 35 and 61% without rain, what should I do?
a dvd + r disc stored at 35.4 degrees of temperature and humidity between 35 and 61% have a life expectancy of useful how many years?
25 + 10 = 35 degrees


#7

We cannot predict the expected lifespan. There are too many variables, as I pointed out earlier.

The only thing you can do, if you insist on using optical media, is to purchase only the very best quality discs, like Verbatim AZO discs, or Taiyo Yuden while they are still available, then burn them at moderate speeds (no more than 8x). Store the discs in individual cases, and be careful in handling them.

If the data is extremely important, you should keep it in other formats as well, not just on optical discs. Store it on hard drives also.


#8

It is very hard to find media AZO Verbatim or Taiyo Yuden, I just encounter Philips, Sony, Smartbuy, Ridata






#9

If you want to add an extra security layer to your optical media,maybe Nero’s SecurDisc is something to look at :

While you loose ‘valueable’ storage space,in case something goes wrong,your recovery chances will rise up…:slight_smile:


#10

Then you are in trouble for using optical media.

I would avoid Ritek/Ridata and Philips. I have no idea who makes the Smartbuy discs, but someone else here on the forum might. If you have one, you might want to look at the disc using ImgBurn and tell us the MID code.

Sony? Once upon a time you could get good discs in that brand, but these days they might be plain old CMC Magnetics discs or MBI or even Ritek. I haven’t kept up with them. Again, we could tell you more about them if you read one in ImgBurn and tell us the MID code. Discovery mode in ImgBurn would work for this.


#11

Smartbuy is made by Prodisc, Philips has id CMC mag,Ridata is Ritek id and sony do not know what id possesses, is also the brand Nipponic media


#12

retrogamer15, given your choices (or lack of choices) you might want to buy two different brands (preferably the better packaged brands) and burn your data twice. One time on disks from one brand and then repeat the same burn on the other brand.

Burn them at rated speeds (as seen on the box) and verify each burn. Not sure whether your budget allows for this, but it’s a possible approach.


#13

What DVD media is better and durable, Sony, Philips, Smart Buy or Nipponic?


#14

Who makes the DVDs from Sony, Philips, and smartbuy nipponic? Which of these brands has more quality and durability?