Does Video Editing Need To Be This Complicated?

vbimport

#1

I’ve been trying to get a grasp of video editing for the past 6 months to a year. This is more a statement with a question kind of thing. First I’d like to say that the forums on this site have been extremely helpful. That being said, I have to relate what precipitated this post. I opened up IfoEdit again. I periodically try to learn something new about a number of programs. I decided to take a minute to look at all the boxes on the open program. Remembering back to my first computer, the biggest problem was “what the hell do these terms mean?” “What is an .exe file?”, and so on. Well, video is even more daunting. Remux, demux, BUP, IFO, VOB, VTS, Tmpg, and so on. Maybe the newbie forum would be well served if one of the members were to put together all the terms, what they mean, where they fit in the scheme of things in constructing, destructing, reinventing videos.


#2

IfoEdit is a notoriously unfriendly little program. I haven’t messed with it in years. PgcEdit and VobBlanker are about the only ones of that type I use, and [B]only when absolutely necessary[/B].

It is possible to work with video on a different level, using video streams, audio streams and subtitles on a timeline. That is my preferred method. Then author to dvd-video if that is your intended goal. There are a few good editing programs that are free, like Virtualdub or AviDemux, but for some types of video you are better off with more specialized tools, like Womble Mpeg Video Wizard DVD for mpeg2. Editing the newer formats like .mkv or .m2ts files is a bit more problematic, depending on what you want to do.

But every field has its own terminology, its own language, and if you want to learn how to work with video you have to be able to speak that language. No way around having a basic vocabulary of terms. I suggest you go to videohelp.com and look at their glossary if you run into one you don’t understand: http://www.videohelp.com/glossary
Wikipedia has more complete definitions, and often times has links to even more in-depth articles in a particular subject.