Does the drive make a difference when ripping?

vbimport

#1

Hi all. Newbie here. I’ve used the search function for about an hour now and can’t find an answer to my questions.

I’m using EAC and LAME to rip my cds to mp3s. Does it make a difference in mp3 quality what cd/cdrw drive is used to rip my cds? I’m not meaning how fast it can rip a cd, or how well it can read scratched up cds. If EAC states that there were no errors during extraction of the cd, can I assume I have the best quality mp3s possible using this combo of software?

I’ve been using a sony vaio laptop to do all of my ripping, and the equipment isn’t even close to some of the equipment I’ve been reading about.

Also, does it effect the quality of the extraction or encoding if I’m using the computer, while ripping/encoding, to surf the internet or to word process?

Thanks all!!!


#2

Although there COULD BE some picayune differences, I trust EAC rather explicitly. If it says you’ve gotten 100%, then you’ve gotten so close to 100% that it’d be VERY hard to tell the difference.

In my experience, the MP3’s created by LAME using the recommended settings that EAC wants to use are very good also. However, certainly it’s possible to get BETTER MP3’s, if you rip to wave and then use some other program to create the MP3’s.

But your drive has (almost) NOTHING to do with the end quality of the MP3 if EAC says that there were no errors. Fear not!

Also, does it effect the quality of the extraction or encoding if I’m using the computer, while ripping/encoding, to surf the internet or to word process?

Not at all, unless you’re causing frequent buffer underruns. And even then, not really. Surf away!


#3

I agree with gurm, except for the point about drive not making a difference. While the difference is usually quite small, some drives just produce much better burn quality on more media. While it might not make a difference in the playability now, it might not play so good two years from now with a marginal burner.