Does -r dvd's finalize faster then +r?

vbimport

#1

i have both dvd +r and -r…my question is does dvd-r’s finalizine faster then +r dvd’s… because i just burned a -r with dvd fab and watched it finalize it went from 0-100% in 2 seconds,but a +r takes like 30 seconds…e.d 10%.50%.75%,then 80% …?


#2

I don’t have any tech. specs on what all is required in a finalization of the two formats, but I believe it depends on the drive you have more than it does on the formats themselves. At least, that’s been my experience.


#3

I have noticed that also -R always finalize a lot faster than any of my +R discs do no
matter which program I’m using to burn the discs with Nero, DiscSpeed 4, ImgBurn,
DVDFab Platinum, it seems that they all use a short lead-out finalization on -R discs. :confused:


#4

They burn faster too.


#5

I agree with Albert…depends on the drive(brand/model/maker) and always has.


#6

It also could be that some burners bitset the +R’s to DVD-ROM so that might take a little longer but what the heck is a few more seconds, Just a thought here


#7

No, it’s not the bitsetting, since bitsetting occurs on the lead-in, but like you said Jimbo, it’s only a matter of a few seconds anyway.
To be honest, I guess I never noticed. I rarely use -R media, but I just tried this on a Litey LH-20A1S and the Yuden T02 (+R) took about 10-12 seconds longer than the TYG03 (-R) to finalize. I’ll try it on a Samsung 203B and a Benq 1655 next time I burn.

Albert and Bob might be on to something, I sure as heck don’t know, but so far -R is leading this horse race


#8

[QUOTE=maineman;2104899]Albert and Bob might be on to something, I sure as heck don’t know, but so far -R is leading this horse race[/QUOTE]Tom it’s the LG’s that have the lead on the lead in and out race and have had that for some time now. Actually the LGs rule for both +R and -R’s in lead in and out. The ones i have (H42N and H62L) are very fast accurate burners.


#9

[QUOTE=Bob;2104901]Tom it’s the LG’s that have the lead on the lead in and out race and have had that for some time now. Actually the LGs rule for both +R and -R’s in lead in and out. The ones i have (H42N and H62L) are very fast accurate burners.[/QUOTE]
Thanks for the info Bob…:flower:
So, the suspense is still killing me…:rolleyes::bigsmile:
Given the same burner, are the lead-out times the same or does one format (?-R) edge the other?

Thanks Bobbo…:wink:


#10

[QUOTE=maineman;2104904]Thanks for the info Bob…:flower:
So, the suspense is still killing me…:rolleyes::bigsmile:
Given the same burner, are the lead-out times the same or does one format (?-R) edge the other?

Thanks Bobbo…;)[/QUOTE]Sorry been makin’ some jalapeno aigs :\ lmao for real and got distracted Tom. No the LG’s i mentioned i have don’t discriminate +R or -R’s. They just have shorter lead in and out that other drives. Now Albert has different LG’s than i do so i will let him reply. LG’s are a lot faster that way.


#11

Multiple recording sessions and compatibility

If you want to partially record a DVD-R(W) disc and use it immediately, but also want to be able to record more data later, border zones are used, which are meant to make this partially recorded disc compatible with standard DVD-ROM players. So every -R(W) recording session has to start with a border-in area (except the first one, which starts with the lead-in) and stop with a border-out area.

However, the size of these border zones is quite amazing : 32 to 96 MB for the first zone, then 6 to 18 MB for the next ones. This means that a disc containing 3 recorded sessions can require up to 132 MB (more than 2% of the complete storage capacity) just for separating these regions. Furthermore, the border-out and border-in areas have to be linked together, using one of the 3 methods (and the possible associated problems) explained previously. Note also that for some unknown reason a border-out is needed before the lead-out, while the first border-in is replaced by the lead-in.

On the other hand, when multiple recording sessions are used on a DVD+R(W) disc, Intro and Closure zones are used (the counterpart of border-in and border-out), but they are always 2 MB large : therefore, with + format, a 3 sessions disc always uses only 4 MB to delimit the regions (the lead-out replaces the last Closure zone). Also a nice feature of multi-sessions implementation on DVD+R(W) is that one can use a session to reserve space, i.e. sectors which are left unrecorded (this blank area is called Reserved Fragment). Thus, additional data can be recorded in next sessions while the first one will only be written later : this can be useful for instance when a precise location on the disc has to contain file system tables, which can only be filled after all the files have been written to the disc.

Compatibility is a very sensitive topic when comparing the two technologies, but independently of media, recorders and players quality, some logical causes of incompatibility can be noted. Indeed, both recordable formats use values in the lead-in structures which were forbidden or reserved in the first DVD-ROM specification (e.g. disc structure, recording density, etc) and which can cause compatibility failures on some old or particularly picky players.

A famous example of such logical incompatibility is the “Book Type” field, which indicates the type of the disc. The first DVD-ROM specification only allowed 0 (i.e. read-only) to be written there, but later each recordable format defined its own value to identify itself ; unfortunately it turned out that some players simply refuse to read a disc with a non-zero value. To handle this problem, the latest DVD+R standard specifically authorizes to write a zero Book Type for compatibility reasons, and nowadays many drive manufacturers have made this bit programmable. But this cannot be done for DVD-R(W), as the Book Type (with several other information in the lead-in) are pre-embossed (i.e. pre-recorded) on blank media. Note however that although it reduces compatibility, this pre-recorded Book Type also improves copy-protection security, as it enables any player to easily identify a DVD-R(W) disc.

An additional compatibility risk exist with DVD-(W) in the user data area and is introduced by the 2K/32K linking methods. Indeed, the linking sectors used with these methods must use a special data type to be differentiated from normal data sectors, and this value was not allowed in the original DVD-ROM specification. There’s no known study about the impact of this field on compatibility, but sector headers are a vital part of the decoding process, and therefore it is always safer to keep them fully compliant with the strictest DVD-ROM standard.

http://www.cdfreaks.com/reviews/Why-DVDRW-is-superior-to-DVD-RW

they have different finalization methonds. and an explanation of booktype. :slight_smile:


#12

This is a pretty bold statement, but on my LGs [4166B, E40L], LiteOns [SOHW-1693S, A1 series, A4 series], and a Samsung or two [SH-S182M, rebadged SH-S202N], it is more the lead-ins for the discs that show any difference. Lead-outs [finalization] on those drives are not consistent to any one format, and average across both formats is about the same. That is where I get my theory from. :iagree:

For me, though, there is usually 1 other factor involved: initial write speed. Some of my drives do a faster lead-out when writing at 16x; others at 20x; others at 8x.


#13

Thanks Tom for the info as I have never really thought about it and just guessed, and myself I only use +R media


#14

On my standalone recoders DVD-Rs prep faster but the finalize time is only a little faster with DVD-Rs and with +Rs.


#15

[QUOTE=Jimbo;2105158]Thanks Tom for the info as I have never really thought about it and just guessed, and myself I only use +R media[/QUOTE]
Hey Jimbo, not a bad guess.
I don’t even want to think about how many of my answers are guesses…and some of those are after “thinking about it”…:eek::bigsmile: