Does LCD TV suffer burn-in? (Samsung LN40A550)

[qanda]This thread is about the Samsung LN40A550. Click here to see full specs[/qanda]I would like to set my Samsung LCD TV (LN40A550) to 4:3 aspect ratio when receiving non HD signal.

On this mode, it places black bars to either side of the 4:3 image. It’s fine for me, I’d rather see the bars than a distorted image.

But Samsung’s manual mentions that this mode can damage the TV. I believe it refers to burn-in effect.

I learned that LCD TVs are not prone to burn-in. What’s the truth about that?

Regards!

They can suffer from burn-in, but only for a long period of time (several days)
//Danne

Thank you, guys!

Burn in is one of the most commonly misunderstood concepts regarding television displays. Burn in is a phenomenon associated to television products, where a static image left on the screen, over time, can permanently wear itself into the display. This phenomenon is generally associated to phosphor based television displays, such as tubes, CRT rear projection, and plasma.

A common question is if LCD televisions are susceptible to burn in. The most common answer to this question is no, LCDs are immune to burn in. However, this answer is somewhat of a half-truth. It is a fact that LCD displays are immune to phosphor wear, simply because LCD televisions do not use phosphor to create a television image.

LCD displays have certain characteristics that do not make them completely immune to static images. On LCD displays it’s kindly referred to as “video memory.” LCD panels use a complicated process of organizing liquid crystal molecules into a twisted or untwisted state, which allows polarized light to pass through the liquid crystal substrate. Over time, it is possible the liquid crystals can “get used to” the state of twist they are in, causing a static image, similar to phosphor burn-in, appear on the screen.

You’ll only get video memory buildup on an LCD television if you try to do it on purpose.

:cool::cool:

Thanks a lot, “platinumsword”!

in addition to platinumsword’s excellent explanation I’d like to add that you can almost always reverse LCD “burn in” by running full screen video or looping a dead pixel repair dvd for a few hours

BETOBR
PLATINUMSWORD is right. However to see your regular
digital channels without the distortion. First of all check your
settings and see if you have a setting for regular 480p viewing.
if you do then just adjusting the picture settings usually
brightness,and sharpness will solve this problem. There’s no
need to change settings from widescreen[ unless you have
stretch which will on some channels make the pictures and people
look wide.
ZAP.:bigsmile::bigsmile:

zap em

Yes, my TV has a setting for regular 480p viewing.
It bothers me to watch a stretched image. That’s why I was concerned about the black bars to either side of the 4:3 image, since Samsung’s manual claims that this mode can cause damage.

Again, thanks for your support guys!

All TV’s including CRT suffer burn in given enough time. That is why we now see built in screen savers on DVD players and TV’s. Black bars would not be a problem if you change channels once in a while.

I watch a lot of 80s TV programs and I have noticed along the left side a thin black faint line where the picture would normally stop on an 4:3 program.

EDIT: I should mention that I have a 46" Samsung LCD TV that is about 4 years old.

Is there anything I can do to fix this?

Thanks,

Kim
Newbie

[QUOTE=platinumsword;2204859]Burn in is one of the most commonly misunderstood concepts regarding television displays. Burn in is a phenomenon associated to television products, where a static image left on the screen, over time, can permanently wear itself into the display. This phenomenon is generally associated to phosphor based television displays, such as tubes, CRT rear projection, and plasma.

A common question is if LCD televisions are susceptible to burn in. The most common answer to this question is no, LCDs are immune to burn in. However, this answer is somewhat of a half-truth. It is a fact that LCD displays are immune to phosphor wear, simply because LCD televisions do not use phosphor to create a television image.

LCD displays have certain characteristics that do not make them completely immune to static images. On LCD displays it’s kindly referred to as “video memory.” LCD panels use a complicated process of organizing liquid crystal molecules into a twisted or untwisted state, which allows polarized light to pass through the liquid crystal substrate. Over time, it is possible the liquid crystals can “get used to” the state of twist they are in, causing a static image, similar to phosphor burn-in, appear on the screen.

You’ll only get video memory buildup on an LCD television if you try to do it on purpose.

:cool::cool:[/QUOTE]

Maybe its the overspill from the overscan which hold some info about the teletext (features)??