Documentaries you have watched or want to watch

vbimport

#1

What documentary do you like
I Find I am interested in ( controversial)
There are so many

what I`m watching now

Adolf Hitler The Greatest Story Never Told .
Discovery Channel Incredible Engineering Blunders Fixed.
BBC Map Man Series 2.

Grand designs Kevin McCloud
Barging Round Britain
BBC 24 Hours In The Past Series
ITV Joanna Lumley’s Trans Siberian Adventure
ALL waiting to go on DLDVD cant lose them on anothe 2tig HD

My Kids say why dont you just watch on you tube …
BEST you tube comment ( IF I give you 1 pence for every Pixel you used ILL have 70 pence )
Watched all Lucy Worsley Doc ♥


#2

Old doc but very interesting.



#3

I just finished watching most episodes of Mayday. Quite interesting to see how many things usually have to go wrong before an aircraft actually crashes and how simple sometimes the reason for a crash can be, like a single broken lamp.


#4

I love watching documentaries. Especially ones about geology. The series “How The Earth Was Made” is one of my favorites.


#5

I watched a very interesting episode of “Panorama” last night talking about the Talk Talk hack and the security of personal data.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#6

That was a very very nice trip on memory lane. Anyone who ever worked with BBSes should watch this.


#7

Now that’s a long time ago!

I never really got involved in the Bulletin Board community but I remember them being about.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#8

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2763182]

That was a very very nice trip on memory lane. Anyone who ever worked with BBSes should watch this.[/QUOTE]

Was part of that era myself and had a great trip down memory lane too.
URL: http://www.bbsdocumentary.com/ :iagree:

I bought the BBS Documentary together with “Get Lamp”, a documentary about Text adventure games (Infocom’s Zork trilogy a.o.)
URL: http://www.getlamp.com/

Was a part of that era as well and it was yet another great trip down memory lane… still enjoy interactive fiction as it is called nowadays. With the DVD, I got my only adventure coin… a nice gimmick I may add… :bigsmile: - My adventure coin:

Get lamp - Go north :smiley:




#9

Now that would be more my thing!

I loved adventure games right from the early text based days all the way up to the Lucasfilms extravaganzas.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#10

[QUOTE=Wombler;2763264]Now that would be more my thing!

I loved adventure games right from the early text based days all the way up to the Lucasfilms extravaganzas.

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]

from the Get Lamp site:

  • [B]They were called “computer adventure games”, and they used the most powerful graphics processor in the world: the human mind.[/B]

Affirmative… I have pictures that never existed in my head more than 35 years later. I know how that wooden cabin looks like, I know how each part of that winding road winds along the landscape and the things I can tell you about that clearing, the well and so on :stuck_out_tongue:
Don’t even insinuate that I have seen a drawing of the rainbow bridge later on - [B]That drawing is a fake[/B], I know how it looks! … :bigsmile:.

I recommend everyonoe who enjoy Interactive Fiction (IF) to view the “Get Lamp” documentary, it is great. :iagree:

Two other documentaries I have enjoyed watching are these two from pinballwideo.com

As an old time Pinball Wizzard, having spent countless money playing many of the tables featured, both of the DVDs provided a great trip down nostalgia avenue - [B]Dang![/B] I miss the arcade halls :wink:



#11

[QUOTE=Wombler;2763264]Now that would be more my thing!

I loved adventure games right from the early text based days all the way up to the Lucasfilms extravaganzas.

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]

You should have more than enoug reading material right here then. :slight_smile:

Original url: http://ascii.textfiles.com/archives/4834

This is big news, in the realm of game design studies.

During the production of GET LAMP, I spent a lot of time digitizing or photographing all sorts of artifacts and documents related to Interactive Fiction and text adventures. This included books, advertisements, printouts, and various ephemera that various players or programmers had lying around from that era. This would usually involve one or two ads, maybe a map or two that someone had drawn, and one or two photos snapped at a convention.

But not in the case of Steve Meretzky.

If you’re coming into this relatively new, or even if you need a little brush-up, let me state: Steve Meretzky has earned the title of “Game God” several times over, having been at the center of the early zenith of computer games in the 1980s and persisting, even thriving, in the years since. He continues to work in the industry, still doing game design, 35 years since he started out as a tester at what would become Infocom.

But more than that – besides writing a large amount of game classics in the Interactive Fiction realm, he also was an incredibly good historian and archivist, saving everything.

EVERYTHING.

When we finally connected during production (as it turned out, we lived within 10 miles of each other), Steve showed me his collection of items he had from the days of Infocom (which spanned from roughly 1981 through to the company’s eventual closing and absorption by Activision in the early 1990s). And it was a hell of a collection:

Recognizing the value here, not just for my documentary but for the world at large, I gained permission from Steve to start scanning these items. First, in his basement, and then, when the job extended past a few weekends and it got annoying to have this guy in Steve’s basement, from my home, in a setup that I would work from with a set of pliers (for staples) and just scanning, constantly, as I could:

This took a long time. I scanned as much as I could, and after working on Steve’s “design binders”, which are very large combinations of every scrap of paper related to a game, I took a run at the file cabinet, which had pretty much every major communicated aspect of the Infocom company, from memorandums and business process through to interoffice softball game preparations and crab race outcomes. I definitely didn’t get everything, but I got a whole lot. Something on the order of roughly 9,000 scanned items, in fact.

Ultimately, Steve moved out of his lovely home and went to the west coast. His binders, artifacts and other items went to Stanford University, where they are housed today. I sent them copies of my hard drives, and they are using them (to my delight) to house their own digital form of the archives, and intend to bring in the remainder of the materials over time.

I ended up using a lot of material in GET LAMP, with loving pans across these 600dpi images of puzzles, writing and advertisements while people talked about text games and the craft of creating them. And after the movie was done, I put the scans away and moved onto other projects.

Until now.

Today, I’m dropping the first set of what I hope will be the vast majority of the stuff I scanned during that production year, onto the Internet Archive. The collection is called The Infocom Cabinet, and right now it has every design notebook/binder that Steve Meretzky kept during the period of what most people consider “Classic” Infocom. This includes binders for:

Planetfall (1983) (Part 1, Part 2)
Sorcerer (1984)
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (1984)
A Mind Forever Voyaging (1985)
Leather Goddesses of Phobos (1986)
Stationfall (1987)
Zork Zero: The Revenge of Megaboz (1988)

Right there are nearly 4,000 pages of material to go through related to the production of these games.

Bear in mind: Steve did not mess around when it came to assembling these folders. He includes the light, drizzly roots of a given game, whether it be some cut-out newspaper articles or an exchange between employees of “what should Steve work on next”. (In some cases, heavy descriptions of the games Steve never got a chance to make, including a Titanic game and Minute Mysteries.) It then follows through many iterations of the maps, puzzles, references of any given work. Often, there are draft versions of the artwork and text for the manual and hint books, including all correspondence with outside vendors (like G/R, the copywrite/design group Infocom used heavily and which Steve has the occasional huge disagreement with). Then, once the game is functional, we have letters and feedback from playtesters.

(PLEASE NOTE: I HAVE REDACTED THE NAMES AND PERSONAL INFORMATION OF THE PLAYTESTERS INVOLVED – ORIGINAL UNREDACTED COPIES ARE NOT ONLINE BUT EXISTENT.)

For someone involved in game design, this is priceless work. Unfettered by the crushing schedules and indie limits of the current industry, the designers at Infocom (including Steve, but not limited to him by any means) were able to really explore what made games so much fun, where the medium could go, and what choices could be made. It’s all here.

But more than that, and I mean much more – Steve kept all the memos, business process, and related papers that were generated through Infocom Inc.’s life. Like, pretty much all of it.

This gets slightly harder for me to put up – I am going to have to work with Steve and some of the other people involved as to what can go up now and what should stay in Stanford’s stacks for researchers to work with. But for now, a healthy set of materials have gone up:

Infocom Sales Data
Photographs and Slides during Infocom’s Life
Advertisements and Ad Copy
Phone and Employee Lists
Development Schedules
Zork Implementation Language documentation
Moving Infocom to its Second Cambridge Location

This is a relatively tiny amount of the total internal company scans I have made, but these are the ones that I can put up without worrying about it crashing into anyone’s life. Again, personal information has been removed, and the focus has been on company process and interesting historical documents.

There’s so much more not up right now, but this 4,000 page cache should give you something pretty extensive to chew on. I also can’t promise when the ‘next wave’ will come, as it really will be time consuming to go through compared to the relatively light (personal-information-wise) design binders. But it will!

I can’t thank Steve enough for what he did during the timespan of Infocom – he just absolutely captured a very special company during a very special time and kept it, well-sorted and updated, for years and years. That we have this at all is a tribute to his staying firm to this approach, even with the side-effort of, you know, completely revolutionizing computer games.

Enjoy this holiday treat.


#12

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2763999]You should have more than enoug reading material right here then. :slight_smile:

Original url: http://ascii.textfiles.com/archives/4834[/QUOTE]

Thank you very much. :flower:


#13

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2763999]You should have more than enoug reading material right here then. :slight_smile:

Original url: http://ascii.textfiles.com/archives/4834[/QUOTE]

Thanks for that. I’ll check it out when I get a chance. :cool:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#14

[QUOTE=Xercus;2763249]I bought the BBS Documentary together with “Get Lamp”, a documentary about Text adventure games (Infocom’s Zork trilogy a.o.)[/QUOTE]

I’ve watched Get Lamp yesterday evening. Didn’t like it as much as the BBS documentary, but i think that’s because i never really was that much active in the IF. Those days i was more interested in technology than in games.

I do have a lot of Infocom games and i understand their worth in the great scheme of all things videogaming. I even have that rare Legend of Infocom cdrom somewhere.

I’ve played a lot of Steve Meretzky games, starting with The Hithchikers Guide to the galaxy (which was insanely hard so i gave up) and ended with Erik The Unready. I absolutely loved Meretzky’s parser. It understood English almost perfectly. English is not my first language, but thanks to these games i learned a lot in a very short time. SuperHero League of Hoboken was also awesome. Meretzky games are really really really incredibly well made. All his praise is well deserved.

Nevertheless, a nice time well spent with this documentary.


#15

The last adventure game I really got my teeth into was “Grim Fandango”.

They don’t seem to make them with such high production values anymore.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#16

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2764112]I’ve watched Get Lamp yesterday evening. Didn’t like it as much as the BBS documentary, but i think that’s because i never really was that much active in the IF. Those days i was more interested in technology than in games.

I do have a lot of Infocom games and i understand their worth in the great scheme of all things videogaming. I even have that rare Legend of Infocom cdrom somewhere.

I’ve played a [B]lot[/B] of Steve Meretzky games, starting with The Hithchikers Guide to the galaxy (which was insanely hard so i gave up) and ended with Erik The Unready. I absolutely loved Meretzky’s parser. It understood English almost perfectly. English is not my first language, but thanks to these games i learned a lot in a very short time. SuperHero League of Hoboken was also awesome. Meretzky games are really really really incredibly well made. All his praise is well deserved.

Nevertheless, a nice time well spent with this documentary.[/QUOTE]

I grew up with 70s crazy-comic, Monty Python, Cheech & Chong et all and was lucky enough to work with a British student who had taped the entire Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy BBC radio serie in the early 80s. I traded my Rasa - Universal Forum original LP for his cassettes and my destiny was pretty much sealed…

Infocom captured the time perfectly with witty comments in bleeding hard to finish games, phew! I had MAPS, MAPS and then MAPS. It was just as often a crazy solution to a challenge as a logical one. A plot that suited me fine. After sweating through the Zork trilogy several times to try different possibilities, Infocom became my guiding star. Sure, there were companies like “Magnetic Fields” and “Level 9”, but they never ‘owned my soul’ the way Infocom did.
I KNOW what you say when you say HHGTTG is incredibly hard with repeating commands and all to achieve the goal. However, I can honestly say that giving in was no option though, NEVER! Death before dishonor! and so on :stuck_out_tongue:
Like you, I love games by Steve Meretzky, a one man institution imo.

Especially for you, did you download the BBS Documentary programs?: https://archive.org/details/2015.11.11.software.bbsdocumentary.com

For people interested in old day games developers, the following URL http://dadgum.com/giantlist/ may be of interest.

Personally, I’ve been hard at work the last few years rescuing whatever was left of the huge Infocom website legacy that was present on the net in the late 90s. Those I could find was offlined, cleaned as good as I could, restoring the pages (missing graphics a.s.o.)
Glad I did, much of it is gone by now, and an Infocom internet era is more or less brought to a close. I will contact the owners and ask for permission to bring them online again sometime in the future.
For now, here is one such site which is still online, the Zork timeline:
http://quendor.robinlionheart.com/ (last update 2005)


#17

[QUOTE=Wombler;2764118]The last adventure game I really got my teeth into was “Grim Fandango”.

They don’t seem to make them with such high production values anymore.

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]
Double Fine is pretty busy getting the rights of all those old Lucasgames adventures. They have already remade Grim Fandango and are currently busy with Day of the Tentacle.


#18

My sister got a copy of Grim Fandango seeing how she gets my leftover computers and it played pretty nice on the dual core with 4 gig I gave her.
I think it still is installed on her latest machine here and it was a fascinating and fun game to watch her play and look at.
I think she got stuck on it somewhere and has kinda forgotten it or something.:frowning:


#19

[QUOTE=Xercus;2764119]I KNOW what you say when you say HHGTTG is incredibly hard with repeating commands and all to achieve the goal. However, I can honestly say that giving in was no option though, NEVER! Death before dishonor! and so on :stuck_out_tongue:
Like you, I love games by Steve Meretzky, a one man institution imo. [/quote] Just a pure coincedence, but the Game Grumps have started doing a game playthrough of THHGTTG 30 Year Anniversary. Here are the first two episodes:

//youtu.be/NiGwgSuL4Jg

//youtu.be/qja7Re96E74

Especially for you, did you download the BBS Documentary programs?
Thanks, but no i did not. It’s a bygone era for me.

Back in those days i had made a fully automated system with Remote Access as the BBS, FrontDoor for the Echomail hosting and Gecho for the reading of it all. Novell Lite served my AT machines.

I could all that on a single RaspBerry Pi these days… :slight_smile:


#20

http://forums.mvgroup.org/index.php?showtopic=63670&st=0

I dident realise Nestle was STEALING so much global water .

the only time I have bought bottled water was to have a container for my tap water .