Do you speak Canadian?

vbimport

#1

Here are some Canadianism:

All-dressed:Food served with all the optional garnishes
Cuffy: Cigarette butt
Browned off: Fed up or disheartened
Two-four: A case of beer
First Peoples: The politically correct term for Canadian Indians
Bazoo: Old rusted car
Fuddle duddle: A euphemism for “go to hell”
Keener: Eager beaver
Steamie:Steamed hot dog
Gitch: underwear

want more


#2

[B]First Peoples or First Nations:[/B] Refer to indigenous peoples of Canada

[B]Two-Four or Flat:[/B] A case of 24 cans of beer.

[B]Keener:[/B] A brown-noser.

[B]Gotch, Ginch, Gonch, Gitch:[/B] refers to men’s brief-style underwear, particularly those that are threadbare. Used in British Columbia and Alberta. Gitch and gotch are variants heard mostly in Saskatchewan. It is also acceptable to append ‘ies’ to any of these variants, especially when referring to the underwear of male children. eg: “Make sure you do laundry tonight, I’m going to need some clean gonch in the morning”. The term is becoming more widespread in use as a result of the rise in popularity of Vancouver-based undergarment company GinchGonch. A “gotch-pull” or “gonch-pull” is another name for a wedgie.

[B]Bazoo:[/B] This is never if rarely coined as a term. We are more likely to use the words.

Jalopy, Clunker, Lemon, Beater, Rust Bucket or Rattletrap

The words Cuffy,Browned Off,Fuddle Duddle and Steamie are rarely if at all used in Western Canada and you are more like to hear the term coined in the French speaking regions of Canada (QUE).

:cool::cool:


#3

I [I]do[/I] know the Canadian Alphabet…‘A’, eh?..‘B’, eh?..‘C’, eh?..‘D’, eh?.. :stuck_out_tongue:


#4

Unfortunately the term Eh! can have a multitude of meanings. :slight_smile:

Some more commonly used terms.

[B]Double-Double:[/B] a coffee with double cream, double sugar (especially, but not exclusively, from Tim Hortons), recently added to the Oxford Dictionary. Triple-triple and four-by-four (less common) are three and four creams/sugars, respectively. Rarely, one can hear a request for a “Gretzky”, nine cream, nine sugar after Wayne Gretzky’s jersey number of 99.

[B]Forty pounder[/B] (forty ouncer) — a 40 oz. bottle of alcohol

[B]Half-Sack:[/B] A six pack of beer.

[B]Mickey:[/B] a small (13 oz.) bottle of liquor, shaped to fit in a pocket, much like a hip flask. Also fits conveniently alongside the calf of a cowboy boot or rubber boot.

[B]Poutine[/B]: french fries covered with gravy and cheese curds.

[B]Sixty-Sixer:[/B] A term for a sixty-two ounce (1.75 L) bottle of liquor (from the old 1/2 U.S. gallon size, 66.6 imp fl oz).

[B]“Take Off”:[/B] expression of disagreement or command to leave, similar to “get lost” (“Take off, you hoser!”). Used by TV characters Bob & Doug McKenzie.

[B]Twenty-sixer or two-six:[/B] a 26 oz bottle of alcohol like vodka etc.

:cool::cool:


#5

I might know a few if I heard them but can’t list any .

If you said bazoo to me it would mean nose.
" He got hit in the bazoo"
.
Two-four: “Two fer” meaning two for one.

Poutine: french fries covered with gravy and cheese curds.
Leave off the cheese curds & this is the way I like my french fries best.
Second would be British style with malt vinegar.
Then plain . Very last would be with ketchup.


#6

“Browned off” is an oldish term here in England, mostly London usage. It’s not heard much these days as the American “pissed off”, or just “pissed” seems to be used now.
Although browned off meant fed up where the latter really means annoyed, but is used for both emotions. In London “brand orff” was the usual pronunciation.

Hey Guys, can we have some American terms and pronunciations, as it sure confuses the hell out of me.
I’m not having a go at you Guys in the US, but you seem to love shortening/abbreviating, or using acronyms, but you always call it the “refrigerator”, what’s wrong with the “fridge”? :confused:


#7

thanks Platinumsword it good to hear the other side.here are a few more tell me if they are right.
The Can: Canada
Schmuck:Verb meanng " to flatten,"as in, " he got schmucked on the road"
Bite moose: Go away
Garburator:A garbage disposal unit
Anglophone:An English-language speaker
Francophone:A French-language speacker
Allophone: Immigrant who specks neither English nor French
Wobbly pop:Big and powerful(a west coast term derived from Chinook jargon)

Got to throw this in go Red Wings

Don’t think I’m picking on the Canadians we Michigander have fun because the upper peninsula has their own language that differs from the lower part.


#8

[QUOTE=voxsmart;2730496]“Browned off” is an oldish term here in England, mostly London usage. It’s not heard much these days as the American “pissed off”, or just “pissed” seems to be used now.
Although browned off meant fed up where the latter really means annoyed, but is used for both emotions. In London “brand orff” was the usual pronunciation.

Hey Guys, can we have some American terms and pronunciations, as it sure confuses the hell out of me.
I’m not having a go at you Guys in the US, but you seem to love shortening/abbreviating, or using acronyms, but you always call it the “refrigerator”, what’s wrong with the “fridge”? :confused:[/QUOTE]

Yeah ‘browned off’ isn’t an entirely uncommon phrase here either and you never hear people say ‘refrigerator’ it’s always ‘fridge’. :iagree:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#9

I do use refrigerator more of the time but occasionally use fridge.
I also use “ice box” a term my grandmother used & where I learned it.
Even though I’ve never used an actual “ice box” . Unless you want to refer to one of the portable “ice chests” as that.
Canadians don’t use any of the above , They just put everything in a box on the porch & let nature cool it. :bigsmile:


#10

Well us english speaking guys us frige and also like cholla us icebox ,and in some parts of the states we use pop for soda
Some slang word .http://www.manythings.org/slang/slang1.html


#11

[QUOTE=marloyd;2730540]in some parts of the states we use pop for soda
[/QUOTE]
I usually use soda but here any soda can be called a “Coke” .
Even when it’s not Coca Cola or a cola at all.

I’ve also heard people use “soda pop” .