Do music artists fare better in a world with illegal file-sharing?

vbimport

#1

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This is the graph the record industry doesn’t want you to see.

It shows the fate of the three main pillars of music industry revenue - recorded music, live music, and PRS revenues (royalties collected on behalf of artists when their music is played in public) over the last 5 years.

We’ve broken each category into two sub-categories so that, for any chunk of revenue - recorded music sales, for instance - you can see the percentage that goes to the artist, and the percentage that goes elsewhere. (In the case of recorded music, the lion’s share of revenue goes to the record label; in the case of live, the promoter takes a cut etc.)
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Link: http://labs.timesonline.co.uk/blog/2009/11/12/do-music-artists-do-better-in-a-world-with-illegal-file-sharing/

:cool::cool:


#2

Honestly I think they do. It gives them competition. Now, if you haven’t noticed; CDs are pretty cheap compared on what they used to be. Target sells some CDs for 9.99 or even 11.99. Prices have gone down because there is competition in the market, that’s mho.