DivX 10 HEVC encoder tests

vbimport

#1

I’ve finally gotten around to downloading the free DivX 10 HEVC encoder and am trying a 1080p encode of Avatar.

I increased the bitrate to 8000 from the standard setting, which should give an output near 10gb in size. This is roughly half the size of one of my copies of the movie using H264 in BD Rebuilder so I should be able to do some direct comparisons and see how well this implementation of HEVC does. 50% reduction in size has been commonly thrown about as the improvement in compression.

This is a very long movie at 2 hrs and 41 minutes, so I suspect I’ll be encoding for while.

BD Rebuilder generally takes 4 to 6 hrs in my i5 Ivy Bridge computer, but I suspect this encoder will be much, much slower.

First impressions of the encoder are that it is quite crude, with few options available. The only container is mkv for this preset, and from information already found in this forum, this version of mkv may not be playable in anything other than the Divx player that comes with this encoder. The only audio selections are AAC at 192 kbps and Mp3. So you will definitely lose the HD audio.


#2

Wow, 45 minutes of encoding time and it is 2% done. At that rate, it would be done in 37 1/2 hours. Think I’ll start over with a small clip taken from the original and try to take the same small clip from my BD Rebuilder copy.


#3

In my opinion, the relevant comparison between an HEVC encode and an AVC/x264 encode needs to use “High Profile” settings for x264.

I don’t know what you can do in BD Rebuilder, but I always use settings based on “High Profile” in Handbrake for HD encodes, since my tests on many inputs including Avatar show that I can produce better results at lower bitrates at the expense of encoding time compared to “Normal” x264 encoding. (Don’t compare using the same RF value)


#4

BD Rebuilder outputs in High profile, 4.1 level for H264 when doing backups of blu ray. So that’s not a problem.

I’m working on the small clips now…but it is turning into a fight. I’ll give some details when the encoder finishes.


#5

The DivX 10 encoder finally finished the little two minute clip. But it has been a struggle.

I cut the section out of the original movie with AviDemux 2.6, cutting on I frames. The original movie had DTS HD MA audio, which nothing liked. The mkv file I made using AviDemux had no audio. So, I used ClownBD to covert the audio to 640kbps AC3 audio in both the original and in my backup copy that I made using BD Rebuilder. The mkv clips from both of these worked perfectly in VLC.

So, I went to the DivX 10 encoder and imported the original mkv clip. It tried to encode it for a second, then stopped with an error code 2 (unknown cause). But not only would it not encode this mkv file, it ruined the clip. The mkv file now showed that it had 0 bytes. This is a cardinal sin in an encoder. It should NEVER harm the input file or change it in any way. All I can say is that this is very poorly implemented by DivX, and is in fact, the worst result I’ve seen in years from any encoding program.

But I didn’t give up. Instead of cutting sections out and putting them in mkv containers, I made two .mts files instead. One from the original, one from the BD Rebuilder version. Here are the MediaInfo results from them:

General
ID                                       : 1 (0x1)
Complete name                            : F:\AVS Output\Original version clip 3.mts
Format                                   : MPEG-TS
File size                                : 451 MiB
Duration                                 : 1mn 59s
Overall bit rate mode                    : Variable
Overall bit rate                         : 31.6 Mbps

Video
ID                                       : 256 (0x100)
Menu ID                                  : 1 (0x1)
Format                                   : AVC
Format/Info                              : Advanced Video Codec
Format profile                           : High@L4.1
Format settings, CABAC                   : Yes
Format settings, ReFrames                : 2 frames
Codec ID                                 : 27
Duration                                 : 1mn 59s
Bit rate mode                            : Variable
Bit rate                                 : 29.4 Mbps
Maximum bit rate                         : 40.0 Mbps
Width                                    : 1 920 pixels
Height                                   : 1 080 pixels
Display aspect ratio                     : 16:9
Frame rate                               : 23.976 fps
Color space                              : YUV
Chroma subsampling                       : 4:2:0
Bit depth                                : 8 bits
Scan type                                : Progressive
Bits/(Pixel*Frame)                       : 0.592
Stream size                              : 419 MiB (93%)

Audio
ID                                       : 257 (0x101)
Menu ID                                  : 1 (0x1)
Format                                   : AC-3
Format/Info                              : Audio Coding 3
Mode extension                           : CM (complete main)
Format settings, Endianness              : Big
Codec ID                                 : 129
Duration                                 : 1mn 59s
Bit rate mode                            : Constant
Bit rate                                 : 640 Kbps
Channel(s)                               : 6 channels
Channel positions                        : Front: L C R, Side: L R, LFE
Sampling rate                            : 48.0 KHz
Bit depth                                : 16 bits
Compression mode                         : Lossy
Delay relative to video                  : -38ms
Stream size                              : 9.11 MiB (2%)

Menu
ID                                       : 4096 (0x1000)
Menu ID                                  : 1 (0x1)
Duration                                 : 1mn 59s
List                                     : 256 (0x100) (AVC) / 257 (0x101) (AC-3)
Service name                             : Service01
Service provider                         : FFmpeg
Service type                             : digital television

General
ID                                       : 1 (0x1)
Complete name                            : F:\AVS Output\BD Rebuilder Version clip 2.mts
Format                                   : MPEG-TS
File size                                : 198 MiB
Duration                                 : 1mn 59s
Overall bit rate mode                    : Variable
Overall bit rate                         : 13.9 Mbps

Video
ID                                       : 256 (0x100)
Menu ID                                  : 1 (0x1)
Format                                   : AVC
Format/Info                              : Advanced Video Codec
Format profile                           : High@L4.1
Format settings, CABAC                   : Yes
Format settings, ReFrames                : 3 frames
Format settings, GOP                     : M=4, N=24
Codec ID                                 : 27
Duration                                 : 1mn 59s
Bit rate mode                            : Variable
Bit rate                                 : 12.5 Mbps
Maximum bit rate                         : 35.0 Mbps
Width                                    : 1 920 pixels
Height                                   : 1 080 pixels
Display aspect ratio                     : 16:9
Frame rate                               : 23.976 fps
Color space                              : YUV
Chroma subsampling                       : 4:2:0
Bit depth                                : 8 bits
Scan type                                : Progressive
Bits/(Pixel*Frame)                       : 0.252
Stream size                              : 178 MiB (90%)

Audio
ID                                       : 257 (0x101)
Menu ID                                  : 1 (0x1)
Format                                   : AC-3
Format/Info                              : Audio Coding 3
Mode extension                           : CM (complete main)
Format settings, Endianness              : Big
Codec ID                                 : 129
Duration                                 : 1mn 59s
Bit rate mode                            : Constant
Bit rate                                 : 640 Kbps
Channel(s)                               : 6 channels
Channel positions                        : Front: L C R, Side: L R, LFE
Sampling rate                            : 48.0 KHz
Bit depth                                : 16 bits
Compression mode                         : Lossy
Delay relative to video                  : -70ms
Stream size                              : 9.11 MiB (5%)

Menu
ID                                       : 4096 (0x1000)
Menu ID                                  : 1 (0x1)
Duration                                 : 1mn 59s
List                                     : 256 (0x100) (AVC) / 257 (0x101) (AC-3)
Service name                             : Service01
Service provider                         : FFmpeg
Service type                             : digital television

#6

The DivX encoder was happy to accept the clip from the original in .mts format, and completed the encode. It even gave me the option to let the AC3 audio pass through untouched, which I used. Unfortunately, the DivX player will not play the sound.

The video plays ok.

Here is the MediaInfo information from the Divx HEVC version:

   : 143943485196702976456740115161497153163 (0x6C4A81C086EA707B232C7006B80B2E8B)
Complete name                            : F:\AVS Output\Divx Output\HEVC version.mkv
Format                                   : Matroska
Format version                           : Version 1
File size                                : 120 MiB
Duration                                 : 1mn 59s
Overall bit rate                         : 8 460 Kbps
Writing application                      : DivXMKVMux 4.0.9.9807
Writing library                          : libDivXMediaFormat 4.0.0.0578

Video
ID                                       : 1
Format                                   : V_MPEGH/ISO/HEVC
Codec ID                                 : V_MPEGH/ISO/HEVC
Duration                                 : 1mn 59s
Bit rate                                 : 7 651 Kbps
Width                                    : 1 920 pixels
Height                                   : 1 080 pixels
Display aspect ratio                     : 16:9
Frame rate mode                          : Constant
Frame rate                               : 23.976 fps
Bits/(Pixel*Frame)                       : 0.154
Stream size                              : 109 MiB (90%)
Language                                 : English
Default                                  : Yes
Forced                                   : No

Audio
ID                                       : 2
Format                                   : AC-3
Format/Info                              : Audio Coding 3
Mode extension                           : CM (complete main)
Format settings, Endianness              : Big
Codec ID                                 : A_AC3
Duration                                 : 1mn 59s
Bit rate mode                            : Constant
Bit rate                                 : 640 Kbps
Channel(s)                               : 6 channels
Channel positions                        : Front: L C R, Side: L R, LFE
Sampling rate                            : 48.0 KHz
Bit depth                                : 16 bits
Compression mode                         : Lossy
Stream size                              : 9.11 MiB (8%)
Language                                 : English
Default                                  : Yes
Forced                                   : No


#7

Since one of our main concerns is file size using this encoder, you can see that the original clip is 451 mb and the H264 bitrate is 31.6Mbps. The BD Rebuilder version is 198mb at 13.9Mbps.

The HEVC version is 120mb and uses an average of 8.46mbps. If you are wondering, I [B]did[/B] use the original clip as the source for this conversion.

Next up will be picture quality, which I haven’t had much of a chance to compare so far.


#8

Using the DivX player, since its the only thing I have that will play this HEVC file, it seems to me that the HEVC version has lost some detail. Its not a bad copy, but I don’t think it is as good as the H264 version from BD Rebuilder.

I’ll try and upload all three clips and let other people take a look.


#9

By the way, none of the usual tools for working with mkv files will work with the HEVC mkv file that is produced by DivX 10. MkvmergeGUI and MKVCleaver just give me error messages when trying to demux or remux the file.

I was trying to find a way to get the audio to work, but it doesn’t look like I have any tools that will help with that.

[I]Edit:[/I] And in yet another black eye moment for this encoder, it will not recognize and import the HEVC mkv file that I made with it earlier. I thought I might be able to pass the video through and re-encode the audio to another format in hopes of getting the DivX player to work, but this thing won’t accept its own output.


#10

There are only so many pixels you can remove from an image and still retain visible quality. Which is why H265 was meant mainly for 4K video. Results on 1080 video will be mixed.


#11

The whole thing is a kludge. There is no spec for HEVC in a MKV yet. That’s why nothing supports it.


#12

Links to the clips:

[HEVC version](http://upload.cdfreaks.com/Kerry56/HEVC version.mkv)

[BD Rebuilder version](http://upload.cdfreaks.com/Kerry56/BD Rebuilder Version clip 2.mts)

[Original blu ray](http://upload.cdfreaks.com/Kerry56/Original version clip 3.mts)

The audio on all three is AC3 now instead of the original DTS HD MA, though the HEVC version audio does not work for me in the DivX player. If anyone knows of another player that can handle this HEVC file, let me know.


#13

So, what’s the final assessment?

The DivX HEVC encoder works after a fashion, but it certainly isn’t a polished piece of software. When importing an m2ts file straight from a blu ray with HD audio, the only choices for audio output were AAC at one bitrate, or MP3. Good grief. This is not acceptable.

When importing an mkv file, it shuts down, and ruins the mkv file. This is not just unacceptable but entirely heinous behavior in any encoding program. On this part alone the encoder gets a big fat FAILURE in score.

When it does complete the encoding job, the AC3 audio that was supposedly passed through doesn’t work, although that same audio works in the original source file. Yet another Failure from the program.

Running at 1080p setting, and using 8000kbps bitrate, the encoder produced a file that was just over 1/4th the size of the original, and did so in an acceptable picture quality, though the output is noticeably degraded from the original, and cannot match an H264 copy that is nearly twice its size. I suspect an H264 copy of the [B]same[/B] file size would look similar with this particular movie as input. So there doesn’t seem to be much advantage using HEVC/H265 in this particular program.

Speed of the encoder…this just sucks.

DivX’s version of an mkv output file isn’t compatible with anything else. This is another mark against them.

HEVC/H265 is the future of video encoding. The benefits it offers for streaming video over the net make it too attractive to ignore. And 4K video will be using it as well. But this early offering from DivX is a slow-motion train wreck.


#14

One other little addendum, though I’m probably just talking to myself in here. I tried the HEVC file in PotPlayer. The video wouldn’t work, but the AC3 audio was just fine.


#15

What’s your CPU?


#16

i5 3570k Ivy Bridge, stock speed of 3.4ghz.


#17

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2700019]One other little addendum, though I’m probably just talking to myself in here. I tried the HEVC file in PotPlayer. The video wouldn’t work, but the AC3 audio was just fine.[/QUOTE]

Been reading yours posts but at this point I suppose it is too new.
I tried if I remember correctly x265, it took like 1 1/2 hours to process 2 minutes…I was using my laptop however and just piddling.
Didn’t ever find out how to play the file so ended up deleting it.

Just my point of view but the “how long it takes to convert” needs to be addressed.
Wonder if a payware version has the bugs worked out yet?


#18

I took a 10 minute BD clip, and converted it with the DivX converter with the HEVC high profile.
It took around 45 minutes, and that’s on a 4770K clocked at 4.5GHz.

Video quality was very good, but like Kerry’s example I had no audio in the player.

H265 is new, and I guess it will take some time to iron out the bugs. For me the biggest problem was the time taken. No doubt in time encoding performance will get better, with perhaps hardware acceleration.

For now, this exercise did provide one clear advantage. It gave me a chance to try out ‘real world stability’ of my overclock. :slight_smile:


#19

Might become the new default benchmark for CPU testing. :wink:


#20

About the mkv files from DivX, the developer of MKVToolNix said in the doom9 forum that we should have the official HEVC on MKV in the next 8 weeks. And that the DivX guys are eager to have the official spec, so they can put it on their encoder. As for having MKVToolNix with HEVC support, since the developer only works on it in it’s free time we might have to wait some time after the official spec comes out.