Differnce between 1366 and 1156 motherboards?

vbimport

#1

Hey guys, I’m looking at making a new build, my old one is over 2 years old so I was doing a little research. Can someone tell me the basic difference between 1156 and 1366 motherboards?

I know there’s lots I can google on, but for the average everyday Joe, what’s the benefits of having a 1366 vs 1156 Intel motherboard. I know the 1366 is newer and more expensive, and can handle the i7-920+ processors, but the 1156 with a i7-860/870 looks pretty good.

Thanks for any words of wisdom.:confused:


#2

Basically.
1366 (X58) is a 3 chip solution and 1156 is a two chip solution.
1156 (P55) moves the x16 PCIe bus onto the CPU chip package, but the downside is there is only x16 PCIe lanes available.or two x8 PCIe lanes. The good point is latency is lower and costs are kept down.

The other chip on 1156 (P55) is called the PCH (Platform Controller Hub), this handles SATA2, HD sound, USB2, Firewire, Lan, and all other peripherals. Interconnection between the PCH and CPU is handled by a 2GB/s DMI.

1366 (X58) also supports tripple channel memory, while 1156 (P55) supports dual channel memory

There is much more to it than this, but that is the basics. :slight_smile:

Maybe these diagrams help. :slight_smile:




#3

To make it easier for you, X58 isn’t simply worth it. Infact you’ll be fine with Q57 or H57 series which in most cases are cheaper…
Looks like decent P55 motherboards have dropped in price though, you can get a MSI P55-GD65 for about the same money as a ASUS P7Q57-M DO/CSM. Have in mind though that unless you plan to overclock the Asus board gives a bit better hardware for the same price (better LAN etc).
//Danne


#4

Dee, Dizzy,

Thanks for the very valuable info.

Dizzy, I thought the Asus boards were better quality and better for overclocking if you were a newbie. I was leaning on getting the Asus P7P, but there was so many combination of the P7P, it was confusing. I don’t need dual monitors, just a decent board where I plan to play with overclocking with standard cooling.:bow:


#5

If you go with Asus get the ASUS P7P55D-E LX LGA 1156 Intel P55 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0. Gigabyte has a board with better audio and better reviews for $20 less, GIGABYTE GA-P55A-UD3P LGA 1156 Intel P55 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0, should OC just as well.


#6

[QUOTE=DiiZzY;2512464]To make it easier for you, X58 isn’t simply worth it.[/QUOTE]

Normally speaking, that is the case. But for video editing and encoding using higher-end “prosumer” software, then X58 does have the advantage. Simply put, these apps (especially Adobe Premiere Pro CS4) require more than 8GB of RAM just to even run smoothly at all - and that 4GB memory modules simply cost way more money per GB than 2GB modules do (for example, a dual-channel 8GB kit now costs more than $400 while a dual-channel 4GB kit costs just over $100). This all but wipes out any price advantage of P55 or Q55/Q57 versus X58 if one needs more than 8GB of total RAM for specific uses (because 1156 can only have a maximum of 8GB total, via four 2GB modules, without having to spend both arms and both legs just on memory while 1366 can have up to 12GB at reasonable cost). 12GB is possible on 1156 - but it would still require the purchase of two astronomically-expensive 4GB DDR3 modules. That makes 12GB for 1156 more than $500 total while that same amount of RAM for 1366 costs about $350 (and thus offsets the price difference between an 1156 platform and a 1366 platform using a CPU of comparable performance). What’s more, the consumer processors using either socket do not support ECC or registered memory at all (although their similar Xeon counterparts support both).


#7

Uhm… CS4 or older can’t use more than 2-3Gb (depending on how Windows is setup) since it’s 32-bit so you’re trying to say that no one could use it until CS5 which isn’t even released yet? How do you find that a valid argument? http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa366778(VS.85).aspx
I would only go with P55 if I wanted to overclock and the MSI board has been reviewed by quite many sites and performed well and I have good experience with it. Wouldn’t touch the Asus P7P boards due to odd choice of onboard components and I dont find USB3 interesting until Intel releases their controller.

//Danne


#8

[QUOTE=DiiZzY;2512539]Uhm… CS4 or older can’t use more than 2-3Gb (depending on how Windows is setup) since it’s 32-bit so you’re trying to say that no one could use it until CS5 which isn’t even released yet? How do you find that a valid argument? http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa366778(VS.85).aspx
I would only go with P55 if I wanted to overclock and the MSI board has been reviewed by quite many sites and performed well and I have good experience with it. Wouldn’t touch the Asus P7P boards due to odd choice of onboard components and I dont find USB3 interesting until Intel releases their controller.[/QUOTE]

Actually, I did monitor the memory usage. Premiere Pro CS4 is partially 64-bit when installed on an x86-64 OS. And when I did video transcoding, the total physical memory usage (as monitored in the Windows Task Manager) often exceeded 5GB (although some of that came from background processes).

And yes, CS4 can use up to about 3GB of physical memory. By contrast, 32-bit applications that are strictly 32-bit cannot use more than 2GB of memory total (per app).

On the other hand, if you are mentioning low-cost consumer video editing software (e.g. Adobe Premiere Elements, Pinnacle Studio, Sony Vegas Movie Studio), they are all currently strictly 32-bit.


#9

For a hardcore gamer that wants to use two top of the line cards in crossfire or SLI then X58 is a must. For Photoshop users 8GB of ram is plenty, one should also have some fast HDD’s and at least one swap drive, maybe a single SSD drive and two swap/storage drives.