Difference between a Data CD-R and a Music CD-R

Hi,
What is the difference between a Data CD-R and a Music CD-R? I just purchased a spindle of TDK 48X CD-R (50 pack) from CompUSA. Price after rebate is $4.99. These are the DATA CD-R. From my limited experience, most of my CD players (home & car) can play music burned from a Data CD-R.

Here is the link to offer from CompUSA:
http://www.compusa.com/products/product_info.asp?product_code=298543

Thanks,
Kenneth

You have CD-Writers as a Hi-Fi stereo component.
The machines are picky when it comes to media because of a certain ‘code’ they’re looking for on the medium.

It is for these devices you, in principle, need the Music CD-R. (however, there are ways to circumvent this)

Consumer, not computer recorders, will not record them!

The GEMA gets much more money for music cd-rs, and whether the GEMA received extra money for a cd-r or not is coded on the disc.
That’s all.

Originally posted by alexnoe
The GEMA gets much more money for music cd-rs

GEMA, RIAA, BumaStemra or whatever you local music copyright protection organisation is called. :slight_smile:

Are we saying a CD-R designed for Music will more likely to play on a consumer cd player (home player & car player)?

And that a CD-R designed for Data will most likely not be recognized on a consumer cd recorder (not pc cd-r or cd-rw)?

Kenneth

A lot of the cd-r’s packaging don’t list whether, or not if there audio, or data cd’s, so how can you tell? Thanks.

Certain standalone audio CD recorders are set only to burn on Audio discs. These discs are identical to data discs, except they are tagged and recognizable by players. Audio discs are generally not better for recording, they’re just a scam (imo) to make up for lost revenue.

Royalties are paid to various organizations from the sale of each audio cd. That’s why they’re more expensive.

I’ve never seen a cd player that wouldn’t playback discs because they weren’t audio… maybe they exist, but all of my car, portable, and standalone players read data cds.

If the disc packaging doesn’t say audio or music, it’s data 99.9% of the time. Unless you’re buying Verbatim Vinyls.

Originally posted by kenneth540
[B]Are we saying a CD-R designed for Music will more likely to play on a consumer cd player (home player & car player)?

And that a CD-R designed for Data will most likely not be recognized on a consumer cd recorder (not pc cd-r or cd-rw)?

Kenneth [/B]

No! There is no technical difference between the cds besides one flag and the paid royalties.

Thanks for the clarifications. BTW, I’ve had ‘data’ CD-R that would not play on some car CD player.

Kenneth

Originally posted by kenneth540
[B]Thanks for the clarifications. BTW, I’ve had ‘data’ CD-R that would not play on some car CD player.

Kenneth [/B]

Try burning at a lower speed. This helps for most brands of car CD players. And if it doesn’t work, buy another brand of CD-Rs.

Thanks for the clarifications. BTW, I’ve had ‘data’ CD-R that would not play on some car CD player.

Many audio players cannot track discs that have more than 74 min of music. Also, I’ve found that the darker (cyanine-type) discs like TY (Fuji) and Verbatim will play in more of the pickier players.

This

That

all answer your question. Ah, behold the mighty power of search…

FlyingDutchman - thanks for info.

[QUOTE=Da_Taxman;375138]You have CD-Writers as a Hi-Fi stereo component.
The machines are picky when it comes to media because of a certain ‘code’ they’re looking for on the medium.

It is for these devices you, in principle, need the Music CD-R. (however, there are ways to circumvent this)[/QUOTE]

I have a Yamaha CDR-HD1300 that will only read CDR music CDs but I am finding difficulty sourceing these locally.

Can you use a PC to format data CDs as music CDs?

Hi and Welcome![QUOTE=Pearly King;2229728]I have a Yamaha CDR-HD1300 that will only read CDR music CDs but I am finding difficulty sourceing these locally.

Can you use a PC to format data CDs as music CDs?[/QUOTE]no, you can’t. The code for identifying a blank disc as Audio-CDR is set during the media manufacturing process. The area, this code is located, cannot be accessed by computer drives.

Michael

That special “code” is a mechanically pressed part of the blank disc.

But aside from that code, and the royalty paid, "Audio CD-R’s"
are different in another way… typically they withstand handling better than “Data CD-R’s”

And there is another difference, though not obvious…

Typically audio CD-R’s use Cyanine dye which is a distinct bluish green color, data CD-R’s are more often pthalocyanine dye which is a much more pale color and is more difficult for some players to distinguish the light and dark pits.

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