Did I damage this DVD Drive?

vbimport

#1

I had this new ASUS 24D3ST DVD burner for a week, when I inserted an old el-cheapo DVD to copy from. The dye in the DVD was warped and it was taking very long to copy. So I decided to do something else, and completely forgot about it, and went to work. When I returned after about 12 hours, I saw the copying program (Teracopy) still trying to read from the DVD, and stuck at one place. When I ejected the DVD, it wasn’t hot at all, but just warm, maybe 3-4 degrees more than ambient temperature.

Now after this incident, the DVD burner burns DVDs properly, but when I try to do quality scans of otherwise scratchless DVDs, this happens all the time:

The quality score is zero all the time with errors at the beginning of the disc. (Although if I slow down the read speed to 8X, the quality scan is much better). This happens for every DVD I insert. The DVDs return 90+ quality score with my Sony drive. I sent the ASUS drive for RMA, but they returned it saying the drive is okay. I can’t prove them other than Nero Quality score comparing the two drives, but ASUS says it isn’t enough of proof to ask for RMA.

Is the DVD drive really damaged from the 12 hour stress of trying to read the corrupt DVD? It can burn DVDs and read them, until I do a quality scan. Should I dump the drive and get a new one? I need archival reliability of the data I back up.

Please help.


#2

…How did quality scans run at 16x look before this all happened? Some drives just don’t like scanning at max speed, and this may just be one of those drives.

Can you still read a DVD+R/-R back at 16x with no failure?


#3

[QUOTE=Albert;2766297]…How did quality scans run at 16x look before this all happened? Some drives just don’t like scanning at max speed, and this may just be one of those drives.

Can you still read a DVD+R/-R back at 16x with no failure?[/QUOTE]

Thank you for the reply. Before this happened, I do not remember well, but I’m sure the analog errors were distributed throughout the DVD evenly. Not more at the beginning at the drive and falling thereafter.

Umm… yes, when I do the benchmark, the read speed abruptly drops at the beginning of the DVD, spikes to normal, and continues to rise normally.


#4

If standing warm in one spot for a long time has somehow left a sticky spot in the tracking, try running a few blasts of seek test to shake up the mechanism


#5

And the drive can write at 16x without issue? I believe you said that.

You know, just limit the read speed to 8x when scanning (that’s a normal thing for us), do a few runs of the seek test in DiscSpeed as Matth said (worth a shot), and trust that this quirk will not lead to a full premature failure. Running the seek test a bunch of times on a bunch of different discs may further confirm your suspicions of the drive being weak, though. But as it is, if it can properly and reliably perform random seeks…I would say it didn’t fully break, and I would definitely use it normally.


#6

The 24D3ST is a LG clone of the GH24NS95/96, so it’s not a reliable scanning drive. Which Sony drive do you have? If the discs are readable in standalone players, it doesn’t matter what the scanning results show.


#7

Thank you very much for your answers!

[QUOTE=Matth;2766307]If standing warm in one spot for a long time has somehow left a sticky spot in the tracking, try running a few blasts of seek test to shake up the mechanism[/QUOTE]

I just did that. 5 seek tests. Still every scan comes up with more errors at the beginning and gradually decreasing after that. This is weird, because at Constant Angular Velocity, the Linear Velocity is slowest at the beginning of the disc, and it should be read better than the periphery, right?

[QUOTE=Albert;2766319]And the drive can write at 16x without issue? I believe you said that.

You know, just limit the read speed to 8x when scanning (that’s a normal thing for us), do a few runs of the seek test in DiscSpeed as Matth said (worth a shot), and trust that this quirk will not lead to a full premature failure. Running the seek test a bunch of times on a bunch of different discs may further confirm your suspicions of the drive being weak, though. But as it is, if it can properly and reliably perform random seeks…I would say it didn’t fully break, and I would definitely use it normally.[/QUOTE]

Yes, the writes are successful at 16X. Do you think if the drive burns DVDs successfully, and the Securdisc Surface scan of Nero is all okay, will the DVDs become faulty in future? (I use Taiyo Yuden for archiving)

[QUOTE=KTL;2766323]The 24D3ST is a LG clone of the GH24NS95/96, so it’s not a reliable scanning drive. Which Sony drive do you have? If the discs are readable in standalone players, it doesn’t matter what the scanning results show.[/QUOTE]

Really?? I thought it was a Liteon clone! I’ve had wicked experiences with LG drives! If only Sony drives were available now in India. Do you get Sony drives in US now? The Sony drive I have is an Optiarc AD-7240S, 2010 made.


#8

Often enough, some of us count Optiarc (which was partly, then wholly, controlled by Sony) as its own entity. For the most part, it used material from the original other half of the venture, NEC, for its own custom drives. Then Sony drives are counted somewhat separately, given its retail presence, while Optiarc was retail + OEM. And we would count the 7240S as an Optiarc, due to it being an evolution of older NEC technology.

Optiarc no longer exists. Once Optiarc ceased to exist, Sony also no longer rebadged drives from other brands (there most recent rebadge having been a LiteOn BDRE drive which also no longer exists, rebadged as both a Sony and an Optiarc). So there are no longer any new genuine Optiarc drives, nor are there any new Sony-branded drives to speak of.


As for burn results versus longevity for your particular media choice:

If the initial burn results are OK with this drive, then there is no reason the disc will degrade any more quickly than if you had used a known good drive. Just do like you would do if you weren’t questioning the quality of the Asus/LG: keep an eye on all your archived media and reburn when necessary. Yes it is possible for a drive to do a bad job of burning a disc, but even that wouldn’t necessarily accelerate the eventual failure of a disc unless the disc itself just went bad.


As for scanning reliability with your Optiarc:

In the past, NEC drives weren’t counted as fully reliable, but by the time Optiarc came about, the drives seemed to have become more reliable for scanning (much more so than the average LG drive). It is especially true, however, that Optiarc drives will let you know when they don’t like a disc, so if you’re not having any issues reading back these discs in the Optiarc, and the LG (essentially) reads them, then I would trust the Optiarc to get a rough idea of how the disc looks.


Disc scanning in general:

Disc scanning can tell you only so much about the state of a disc. Primarily, it tells you if the disc could be read; if the drive struggled, it might indicate which area caused the struggle (or failure). It cannot directly tell you about all physical aspects of the media, but it can give you an indication if the disc is getting hard to read, and you can do a little inspection with your own eyes to see what could be causing the problem, or prompt you to do further tests with other drives.


#9

[QUOTE=baghro;2766407]Really?? I thought it was a Liteon clone! I’ve had wicked experiences with LG drives! If only Sony drives were available now in India. Do you get Sony drives in US now? The Sony drive I have is an Optiarc AD-7240S, 2010 made.[/QUOTE]

Asus started rebadging since the 20x, and they were from LiteOn, LG, and Samsung.

These were how the Asus 24x drives were typically identified:
[ul]
[li]B = LiteOn
[/li][li]D = LG
[/li][li]F = Samsung
[/li][/ul]


#10

[QUOTE=Albert;2766412]Often enough, some of us count Optiarc (which was partly, then wholly, controlled by Sony) as its own entity. For the most part, it used material from the original other half of the venture, NEC, for its own custom drives. Then Sony drives are counted somewhat separately, given its retail presence, while Optiarc was retail + OEM. And we would count the 7240S as an Optiarc, due to it being an evolution of older NEC technology.

Optiarc no longer exists. Once Optiarc ceased to exist, Sony also no longer rebadged drives from other brands (there most recent rebadge having been a LiteOn BDRE drive which also no longer exists, rebadged as both a Sony and an Optiarc). So there are no longer any new genuine Optiarc drives, nor are there any new Sony-branded drives to speak of.


As for burn results versus longevity for your particular media choice:

If the initial burn results are OK with this drive, then there is no reason the disc will degrade any more quickly than if you had used a known good drive. Just do like you would do if you weren’t questioning the quality of the Asus/LG: keep an eye on all your archived media and reburn when necessary. Yes it is possible for a drive to do a bad job of burning a disc, but even that wouldn’t necessarily accelerate the eventual failure of a disc unless the disc itself just went bad.


As for scanning reliability with your Optiarc:

In the past, NEC drives weren’t counted as fully reliable, but by the time Optiarc came about, the drives seemed to have become more reliable for scanning (much more so than the average LG drive). It is especially true, however, that Optiarc drives will let you know when they don’t like a disc, so if you’re not having any issues reading back these discs in the Optiarc, and the LG (essentially) reads them, then I would trust the Optiarc to get a rough idea of how the disc looks.


Disc scanning in general:

Disc scanning can tell you only so much about the state of a disc. Primarily, it tells you if the disc could be read; if the drive struggled, it might indicate which area caused the struggle (or failure). It cannot directly tell you about all physical aspects of the media, but it can give you an indication if the disc is getting hard to read, and you can do a little inspection with your own eyes to see what could be causing the problem, or prompt you to do further tests with other drives.[/QUOTE]

Thank you so much for the invaluable information! I’ll put my mind at ease now with this burner.

[QUOTE=KTL;2766428]Asus started rebadging since the 20x, and they were from LiteOn, LG, and Samsung.

These were how the Asus 24x drives were typically identified:
[ul]
[li]B = LiteOn
[/li][li]D = LG
[/li][li]F = Samsung
[/li][/ul][/QUOTE]

Thank you for this information! So the ASUS drive is an exact copy in terms of hardware of the LG (with the firmware altered)?
The GH24NS95 costs $12 (equivalent) here and the ASUS costs around $16 (equivalent). So the extra $4 is for the brand name or there is betterment in terms of hardware quality?


#11

[QUOTE=baghro;2766533]So the ASUS drive is an exact copy in terms of hardware of the LG (with the firmware altered)?
The GH24NS95 costs $12 (equivalent) here and the ASUS costs around $16 (equivalent). So the extra $4 is for the brand name or there is betterment in terms of hardware quality?[/QUOTE]
Yes, the internal hardware is all the same, firmware is catered for each ID, but I’m not sure what the differences are.

blackened2687 stated here that the Asus 24D3ST firmware may indicate a different generation of the LG drive. So your 3.00 firmware may be based on the GH24NSC0, not the GH24NS95.


#12

Thank you so much for the great information. This is really an awesome forum!


#13

[B]baghro[/B], may I ask you to make a firmware dump from your drive? I’ve asked few people about it, but nobody answered or made the dump.

The dump can be made with DevilsClaw’s Flasher.

Command line:

flasher -d [drive id] -l firmware.bin 6 00000000 00200000

where [drive id] is the identification number of your drive. To know this number, run the flasher with -D parameter:

flasher -D

Flasher can be downloaded here: https://github.com/devilsclaw/flasher/releases/tag/Current_Release

Thanks in advance!