Danish School Teachers

vbimport

#1

Why wouldnt this work in the USA ?


#2

Let the parents pay the cost of this per child every year &[B] see if it remains the same[/B] .
If the parents can’t pay they will be billed until it is paid. The child will also help pay for the education after graduation .

I’m not sure what was meant by :

Your high education is over $21000 a year.

Does “high” refer to the 12th grade level & include college or does it stop at grade 12.
Or is it a reference to the amount .
The last time i checked the amount per child per year was $ 6000 to $12000 depending on the school district in the USA.

Now if Denmark will start being the “World Police” & main military of the free world .Let the US just return home & mostly operate within the USA. Then see if Denmark can still have the same salary & benefits.

I may complain about the USA. I have a right as a citizen.
If a foreigner does it then I will defend the USA .


#3

All countries have their own benefits, but why would we start topics about what we think is so wrong in other countries?


#4

[QUOTE=alan1476;2760349]Why wouldnt this work in the USA ?[/QUOTE]
Doesn’t mention that Denmark has [I]very[/I] high levels of government & personal debt. :wink:

Then again, so does the USA.

Suppose it depends what you spend it on?


#5

The USA needs better teachers. Right now most of them are baby sitters so the parents can work. Teachers in a lot of schools fear for their lives while on the job. A few in each class will get a education because the teachers will work with those that want to learn while trying to ignore the ones that are only there to goof off. I don’t know how to fix it but I think a start would be to bring back the “Board of Education” and use it often.
Remember this is JMHO.


#6

It also has a lot to wealth distribution. I suspect that Danish teacher’s salary is much higher up Denmark’s relative income scale than an American teacher’s.

Like here in the UK, US politicians seem to talk a lot ‘wealth creators’ and give them tax cuts to incentivise & reward. They also argue that it is not the relative distribution of wealth that matters, but how much in absolute terms those at the bottom have.

But is it actually possible to create ‘wealth’?

Governments can create more money at will. But that dilutes its value relative to other currencies and generates inflation. So money certainly isn’t the same thing as wealth.

Indeed if you start considering too closely what money actually is since the end of the gold standard, the whole house of cards is in danger of collapsing. Safest to just take it at face value. Those words “[I]I promise to pay the bearer on demand…[/I]” mean what you actually hold is a piece of government debt.

So when the Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne declared his intention to eliminate all government borrowing, he was actually vowing to end money (in the modern sense), capitalism and the economic model used for the last 500 years. (Either that or he didn’t have a clue what he was talking about.)

Back to wealth…

A company like Apple can produce a product which sells in vast quantities all around the world, but that hasn’t created any wealth just aggregated money which was previously distributed across millions of pockets & bank accounts into one place.

And digging the minerals out of the ground to make it hasn’t created wealth either. There is only a finite amount, so at best you could say it was pre-existing potential wealth. But even the most sought after and valuable minerals only have value because people are prepared to pay for them with existing wealth or money.

But does it actually matter if wealth cannot be created?

Well if that is the case the sum total is finite, then logically [U]everything[/U] becomes relative. The actual value of something finite cannot be determined by an arbitrary absolute numerical value assigned to it. As has already been established the quantity of money in circulation can be increased at will by central banks and its value is highly variable. So the value of any given portion of wealth can only be determined by its relative size.

On the other hand debt can be created.

For example, lets suppose you have an annual council tax bill of £1000. The money for you to pay it has to come from somewhere, but the amount requested can be just a number conjured from thin air. As payment isn’t optional, failure to match the amount of money available to the size of the demand has created a debt (not simply moved it around). Another example is money. Governments can increase the quantity of money in circulation at will, and as money in modern sense is a piece of government debt what they have created is debt not wealth. And these days there is with no upper limit as money it not tied to anything physical. It isn’t even necessary to actually print the money.

So what happens when somebody has the bright idea of reclassifying debt - something entirely intangible which can be created at will - as an asset equivalent to wealth?

The scary thing is that the ‘solution’ being enacted is the same as what led to the disaster. And even more incomprehensible, the apparent measure of success would be a return to the state immediately before the collapse. :confused:




#7

My take on the current state of affairs is that an incredible amount of money has been created out of thin air with not the slightest bit of economic growth to justify its creation. The money was created to fund deficit spending. All is fine as long as the debt is hidden so as to keep the public from knowing just how much unsupported capital there is in the economy. I am sure some idiot somewhere spun a yarn about how the economy will boom with all this new money floating around and that will create the economic growth needed to justify the capital creation. Well, that doesn’t happen and there are plenty of countries to point at where this model ultimately failed. The result is a massive devaluation of currency and rampant inflation. You know, the type of inflation where a loaf of bread costs 25% more in the evening than it did that morning. Then what happens is all the currency manipulations come home to roost all at once and it takes years of economic chaos for everything to reach equilibrium again.

So I read this teacher’s fairy tale about how good she has it in Denmark and she does have it good, for now. However, there is no free lunch and all these wonderful lifestyles the people in debtor countries are living is being done by borrowing from the future. The pyramid scheme will fail eventually and when it does there will be a domino effect that ripples through the world economy. No debtor nation will be spared. Then all these promises politicians have made to their constituents won’t be worth a plug nickel because they won’t be able to continue printing money from thin air to support it.

Money is like any good or service when it comes to supply and demand. Worth goes up as supply goes down and demand increases. Right now most of the economy sees just a portion of the money that exists and has no idea just how much money has been created out of thin air to service debt. Governments can hide this massive amount of created money for just so long before the general public finds out about its quantity. When this happens there will a massive shift in supply and demand for all currencies of debtor nations. No one will accept their money anymore for debt payments because so much of it has been printed that it is essentially worthless. When the debt of these countries can no longer be financed, that Danish teacher is in for a rude awakening. Her lifestyle has been built on the back of other peoples’ money and they are no longer loaning money or have lost everything and have nothing to loan anyone. At that point deficit spending ends and economic growth will be able to start supporting the capital that has flooded the economy. This process will take time and nearly everyone’s standard of living will take a nose dive while it shakes out. The day of reckoning is coming and, IMO, it might be coming sooner than most people think.


#8

I have a feeling the posted image is some Dane’s idea of trolling, and not an actual message by a school teacher.

The woman in the picture is [B]Mille Dinesen[/B], a Danish actress, playing the part of an unconventional and rebellious school teacher in the tv series “[B]Rita[/B]”.


#9

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2760486]I have a feeling the posted image is some Dane’s idea of trolling, and not an actual message by a school teacher.

The woman in the picture is [B]Mille Dinesen[/B], a Danish actress, playing the part of an unconventional and rebellious school teacher in the tv series “[B]Rita[/B]”.[/QUOTE]
Sounds very… educational. :eek:

S3.E4 Aftenskolen

To combat loneliness, Rita invites some students to her house. Meanwhile, Hjordis tries to spice up her sex life with Uffe.


#10

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2760486]I have a feeling the posted image is some Dane’s idea of trolling, and not an actual message by a school teacher.

The woman in the picture is [B]Mille Dinesen[/B], a Danish actress, playing the part of an unconventional and rebellious school teacher in the tv series “[B]Rita[/B]”.[/QUOTE]

Well, they motivated me to vent some steam. I feel a little less stressed now.


#11

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2760486]I have a feeling the posted image is some Dane’s idea of trolling, and not an actual message by a school teacher.

The woman in the picture is [B]Mille Dinesen[/B], a Danish actress, playing the part of an unconventional and rebellious school teacher in the tv series “[B]Rita[/B]”.[/QUOTE]

Listen here Mr. DrageMester… if that is your real name… :rolleyes:

We both know very well that, when someone posts a picture with some words on the internet, what is says on there is the goddamn truth! I will not stand by innocently while you keep insulting people and their intelligence. The internet has a reputation of mindless rage to uphold.

Please think of others before you post such nonsense. :a


#12

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2760809]Listen here Mr. DrageMester… if that is your real name… :rolleyes:[/QUOTE] Sorry, Sir Bedivere. I shouldn’t have suggested that the internet isn’t a Holy Grail of Truth. :stuck_out_tongue:

//youtu.be/yp_l5ntikaU


#13

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2760809]Listen here Mr. DrageMester… if that is your real name… :rolleyes:

We both know very well that, when someone posts a picture with some words on the internet, what is says on there is the goddamn truth! I will not stand by innocently while you keep insulting people and their intelligence. The internet has a reputation of mindless rage to uphold.

Please think of others before you post such nonsense. :a[/QUOTE]
I admire your bravery Mr. B. Few men have the courage to start a flaming war with a dragon.

For this noble deed will undoubtedly receive the ultimate prize… a Darwin Award! :iagree:



[They must be the ultimate prize - nobody is ever going to win one twice!]


#14

When both the dragon and the knight understand sarcasm they can always have a nice cup of tea together and much rejoicing. :cool: :bigsmile:


#15

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2760884]When both the dragon and the knight understand sarcasm they can always have a nice cup of tea together and much rejoicing. :cool: :bigsmile:[/QUOTE]
That’s a scarce commodity these days, but certainly more useful than a pair of asbestos underpants. :iagree:

Make that two scarce commodities - decent quality tea is also getting harder to find.

[I]Humour in onmia[/I]. :iagree:


#16

Sorry to bump an old thread, but I could not help getting interested.
[B]
Truth to be told[/B]
I don’t recall the name, but an American general has much credit when it comes to the European wellfare models after WW2.
The “Nordic model” in place in Denmark as well as here in Norway is based on citizenship only, meaning we recognize the right to treatment if you are injured or sick, no matter if you are unemployed or rich.
This means that we have a large public healthcare system paid by taxes or in other words, everyone is paying for everyone.
We also recognize everyone’s right to an education and yes, we do “pay” for our students as well.
Norway does not have any debt either and is listed as a creditor in the CIA database.

All is not well in the camp though, and Norway is just as capitalistic as the U.S. We are just 15-20 years behind you to be able to call it social democracy. The rich keeps getting richer and the poor gets poorer year by year in this country as well.
You can pay for private healthcare here as well if you wish, you still pay for everyone else’s right to treatment.
Our students do accumulate debt because the amount they receive from the government is too small.
The wellfare rates has not increased substantial since the late '80s.

There was a time when I was proud of this country, but the time was long ago :Z
That is why I do build computers by recycling old swapped for customers and give them away for free to people who can not afford their own. That should not be necessary in one of the richest countries on the planet (pr. citizen), but still it is.
Before envying the Danish/Norwegian teacher, question the cost of living… 8 out of 10 Norwegians are broke when the paycheck/sallary comes, still they say that we have so much money to spend (simple math then tells me that 2 out of 10 have lots of money - If that is not capitalistic, I don’t known shit)

So the truth is that at least the U.S. is honest (and proud?) about being capitalistic. On the other hand, at least, not even drug addicts are thrown out of the hospital for not having insurance.