Critical Java flaw remains

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Critical Java flaw remains.

Critical Java security flaws remain even after the recent patch

Click to read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/critical-java-flaw-remains-65719/](http://www.myce.com/news/critical-java-flaw-remains-65719/)

Feel free to add your comments below. 

Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

What, again? Seems Oracle likes to keep up with traditions.


#3

If we could only get the moron web page designers to stop using Java!


#4

Unfortunately, I need Java in my browser for net-banking (it’s part of the security system), but I really wish there was some (easy) way it could be restricted to only running in a certain domain, but I haven’t yet found a way. :frowning:


#5

Is anything in this world “really” secure? No matter how hard developer’s try, there’s always some security flaw. The biggest flaw, though, is not the software. As stated in Minority Report, the flaw is human. If there were no such thing as hackers, that would be the ultimate solution. Of course, that will never happen. Hence, when we power up the computer, we are taking a chance, even if it is a small one.


#6

DrageMester I think you could do it by adding your bank domains to trusted zone in ie options under security tab. Then you can allow java for that site only. I haven’t tried this method to be sure, but I think it should work.


#7

[QUOTE=iamrocket;2673067]DrageMester I think you could do it by adding your bank domains to trusted zone in ie options under security tab. Then you can allow java for that site only. I haven’t tried this method to be sure, but I think it should work.[/QUOTE] I don’t think this approach has been possible since Microsoft dropped their own JavaVM.


#8

Well so far they released java7u11 now on oracle site so I guess most should go there and download that version and uninstall their old version and then reinstall the new version. I did that for 3 computers so far and 8 more to go…


#9

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2673206]Well so far they released java7u11 now on oracle site so I guess most should go there and download that version and uninstall their old version and then reinstall the new version. I did that for 3 computers so far and 8 more to go…[/QUOTE]This is what I did, and unchecked the box in the Security tab to enable Java to run in the browser. I will enable it when I need to - hopefully, these will be few and far between.

Perhaps the author can expand on his favorite " running your browser in a sandboxed session." Can this be done in Windows 8, and how should we proceed if we want to?


#10

[QUOTE=blegs38552;2673244]Perhaps the author can expand on his favorite " running your browser in a sandboxed session." Can this be done in Windows 8, and how should we proceed if we want to?[/QUOTE]

My pleasure! :slight_smile:

Sandboxing software runs programs in a self contained and protected environment, known as a sandbox, which is isolated from the rest of your system.

Any changes a sandboxed program makes are intercepted by the sandbox software and contained within the sandbox, so viruses and other malware can’t make any changes to your system. Essentially nothing can escape the sandbox unless you specifically allow it and in a way it’s like running a self contained virtual session on your PC.

If you encounter a virus or other malware in a sandboxed browser session you can just close the sandbox and it’s all gone.

We always try to protect our members from dubious sites/content and as an example as to how useful sandboxing software can be, I use it to safely check out suspicious looking URLs or potentially infected downloads.

You can get free sandboxing software and I’d recommend Sandboxie if you’d like to try any of this out.

I run this in Windows 7 but according to the producers of the program it’s now fully compatible with Windows 8. You might want to read this first though.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#11

I like the idea, does it really work?
Thanks
Mike


#12

[QUOTE=mike1061;2674202]I like the idea, does it really work?
Thanks
Mike[/QUOTE]
Yes it works just fine. Good proggy.:clap:


#13

Great, I’m going to look into it.
Thanks
Mike


#14

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2673206]Well so far they released java7u11 now on oracle site so I guess most should go there and download that version and uninstall their old version and then reinstall the new version. I did that for 3 computers so far and 8 more to go…[/QUOTE]

For a while, part of Sun’s Java update process included removing the previous version, but for the last few updates, I’ve had the experience that the installation becomes corrupted unless you do as coolcolors says and [I]manually[I] uninstall the old version (or “versions”, since I use both the 32- and 64-bit flavors) before updating. After all this time, one would think that Sun could at least have gotten the update process right. Nah…


#15

[QUOTE=J.L.Miller;2674308]For a while, part of Sun’s Java update process included removing the previous version, but for the last few updates, I’ve had the experience that the installation becomes corrupted unless you do as coolcolors says and [I]manually[I] uninstall the old version (or “versions”, since I use both the 32- and 64-bit flavors) before updating. After all this time, one would think that Sun could at least have gotten the update process right. Nah…[/QUOTE]

This is what people forget to do manual uninstalling does help fix alot of problems if they exist but at least you will know if the program is having problems or not before updating. Always removing a older program is the best remedy to fix a problem especially if the updates are newer and doesn’t correspond to the first program. I never have like example a java 6 still in my Add/Remove program listing along a java 11 version. That is inviting problems…REMOVE that old version…