Create an ISO image on Mac OS X using built-in Disk Utility App

*Want to create iso on mac? See also herefor iso burning on the Mac

Found this while learning about the MAC and wanted to share:

http://homepage.mac.com/geerlingguy/mac_support/mac_help/pages/0023-convert_dmg_img_iso.html


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CONVERT AND BURN MAC .DMG OR .IMG FILES TO .ISO WINDOWS PC-COMPATIBLE DISK IMAGES:

Question: I have a PC with a DVD burner, but I don’t have a burner on my Mac (or the one on my PC is way faster, so I’d like to use it instead). Is there any way I could use the Disk Image file (.dmg or .img) created by iDVD to burn the DVD on my Windows PC instead?

Answer: (found here) You will have to convert the disk image file created by iDVD to the .iso image format (making it compatible with almost any PC disk burning application, such as Nero or Roxio). To do this, follow these steps:

Open Disk Utility (located in Applications>Utilities folder).

Drag your disk image into the left-hand pane (where all your drives are listed) of Disk Utility.

Click on the file you just dragged into Disk Utility (should appear in the left-hand column).

Click on the ‘Images’ menu, then choose ‘Convert…’

When the ‘Convert Image’ dialog pops up, select ‘DVD/CD Master’ from the ‘Image Format’ pop-up menu.

Name your file, with ‘.cdr’ at the end of the filename, then click ‘Save.’

Disk Utility will convert the file to an ISO image. After this finishes, replace the ‘cdr’ at the end of the filename (in the Finder) to ‘iso’.

Now, the disk should be burnable on a Windows PC (simply copy the file to your PC by either copying it across a network or using some other means of transferring the data).

Note: This works burn any Mac .dmg or .img files on a PC.
Note 2: Another way to do this is to use the program ISOlator
Note 3: For those of you who may be command-line junkies, there’s an alternative method (and another).

Note - I found that between the built-in OS X Disk Utility program and this freeware app called Burn 1.6u:

http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/21992

I can pretty much handle all the basics, saving the need to purchase Toast or some other commercial app. At least so far.

I also found a tidbit that says if you find a .TOAST disk image, you can simply rename it to .ISO and burn it with the Apple OS X Disk Utility as well.

Nice…

Not the most intuitive, but still, it’s all free.

Wish Windows had this stuff built in.

OK, so I see you want to burn a disc from the faster optical drive of your PC. I Think this is not a good idea unless you in a huge rush. Your spending more time finding a way to burn then burning itself. The faster you burn a disc the more likly it is to give an error. I never go aove 8x on a dvd or 16x on a cd (The measurement “X” is different from disc type to disc type). When drive say “54x cd speed compatible” that means they managed to burn ONE successful cd but do not mention the success rate.

On Mac OS X 10.4 using Disk Utility Version 10.5.6 (198.12), THIS DOES NOT WORK!

I went back to a dozen DVDs I’d burned and to what should have been ISO file images. They all contained the HFS+ file system. Totally bloody useless for reading or burning under Windows or Linux. If you think I sound a little irate, you’d be right. Yes, it would have been better if I’d checked the first converted image file. So, my fault, there, for trusting these instructions.

Learn from my experience. If you follow these instructions, make damned sure the resulting image is Joliet format, not HFS+.

Open Disk Utility (located in Applications>Utilities folder).

Drag your disk image into the left-hand pane (where all your drives are listed) of Disk Utility.

Click on the file you just dragged into Disk Utility (should appear in the left-hand column).

Click on the ‘Images’ menu, then choose ‘Convert…’

When the ‘Convert Image’ dialog pops up, select ‘DVD/CD Master’ from the ‘Image Format’ pop-up menu.

Name your file, with ‘.cdr’ at the end of the filename, then click ‘Save.’

Disk Utility will convert the file to an ISO image. After this finishes, replace the ‘cdr’ at the end of the filename (in the Finder) to ‘iso’.

Now, the disk should be burnable on a Windows PC (simply copy the file to your PC by either copying it across a network or using some other means of transferring the data).

[/QUOTE]

Create iso mac - How to Create an iso on Mac os x

I read this thread, and I want to create an ISO image on Mac. From what I found here, if you do not want to waste your DVDs, you have to make sure you follow these steps to create iso mac os x.

And if you want to make your iso readable under Windows or Linux, you have to make sure you use the Joliet format, not HFS+.

So how to create an iso on mac os x?
This is what I found so far.

  • Open Disk Utility which is located in Applications>Utilities

  • Drag your disk image into the left-hand pane of Disk Utility.

  • Click on the file you just dragged into Disk Utility. This file should appear in the left-hand column.

  • Click on the ‘Images’ menu, then choose ‘Convert…’

  • When the ‘Convert Image’ dialog pops up, select ‘DVD/CD Master’ from the ‘Image Format’ pop-up menu.

  • Name your file, with ‘.cdr’ at the end of the filename, then click ‘Save.’

  • Disk Utility will convert the file to an ISO image. After this finishes, replace the ‘cdr’ at the end of the filename to ‘iso’.

  • Now, the disk should be burnable on a Windows PC

Is this for converting only, or can you create an Iso on Mac OS X also?

Thanks for the info :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=mainimac;2472255]
I went back to a dozen DVDs I’d burned and to what should have been ISO file images. They all contained the HFS+ file system. Totally bloody useless for reading or burning under Windows or Linux.
[/QUOTE][/QUOTE]

[humor] Whoa, Man! I know your are upset and I can understand a little conclusion jumping, but to say Linux can’t do something? [humor] :smiley:

Of course Linux can use those discs! There’s prolly a way for Windows to do it too. But as for Linux, make sure hfsprogs are installed, then proceed to mount.

To install hfsprogs in Linux (makes Linux understand HFS and HFS+ and able to make them):

sudo apt-get install hfsprogs

(you probably saw that one coming)

To mount an HFS+ CD in Linux (those odd balls that Mainimac thought were a big waste made by burning Mac OS X extended formatted *.cdr DVD/CD masters made in Disk Utility to a disc):

sudo mount -t hfsplus /dev/cdrom /media/test

That assumes you have a directory “/media/test” to mount to, and that the device name of the CD reader is “/dev/cdrom”. Change as needed.

To mount (in Linux) the original HFS+ *.cdr image that was used to create this whole party:

sudo mount [path to image] [path to mount point] -t hfsplus -o loop 

And Dezign, I’m sorry, but you’re just wrong in more than one way.

[QUOTE=Dezign;2504553]
And if you want to make your iso readable under Windows or Linux, you have to make sure you use the Joliet format, not HFS+.
[/QUOTE]
First, HFS+ formatted CDs are TOTALLY compatible with Linux as stated earlier.
Second, the whole converting thing with Disk Utility you guys keep trying to say will get you to an ISO 9660 formatted image is incorrect. If you are going to change the filesystem of the image, you need to REBUILD the image, like with "hdiutils makehybrid."
You have a CD image that is HFS+ formatted, and want an iso formatted CD image. Telling Mac to convert an HFS+ DVD/CD master to a DVD/CD master isn’t going to change anything if Mac already accepts HFS+ as being a DVD/CD-master-okay filesystem. In fact, I proved this myself by obtaining the md5 hash of an HFS+ DVD/CD master CD image, telling Disk Utility to convert it into a DVD/CD master, hashed the new image, and the hashes matched.
Note that UDF formatted CDs and DVDs are compatible with Linux and Windows as well.
Also note that Joliet is NOT a filesystem. It is an optional extension of the ISO 9660 filesystem.

To make an iso via imaging a CD in Mac, simply make the image in Disk Utility by inserting the disc, clicking the disc in Disk Utility, hitting “New Image”, then selecting DVD/CD master for the image format, give it a name and place to be, and hit save. And BOOM! You have an iso. That easy. Feel free to change the extension from *.cdr to *.iso. Just know changing the file extension doesn’t do anything magical. It was already an iso, we’re just renaming it.

To actually rebuild an image where you rip the files and folders (but not boot info or volume labels, filesystems, etc.) out of, say an HFS+ CD image, and re-weave them into a new ISO 9660 + Joliet CD image, open terminal, and do the following:

[QUOTE=robbieduncan;2669623]##[Still making the HFS+ image you guys already have at this point of the quote]
Create a folder with the contents you want on your ISO.

Open Disk Utility and use the New Image from Folder menu item to create an image. Ensure it is uncompressed and use the CD/DVD master option.

In my experience this creates HFS+ masters which are no good in Windows.
##[OK, now Robbieduncan is where you are]

Open the Terminal

Assuming your new image is called ~/Desktop/Master.cdr (the file is on your desktop and called Master.cdr) type:


cd ~/Desktop
hdiutil makehybrid -iso -joliet -o Master.iso Master.cdr

This will create an ISO/Joliet .iso file.[/QUOTE]

And Mainimac, not to rub it in further, but to prevent a future tragedy, you can simply double-click a CD image in Mac and it will be mounted by the CD driver as a pseudo-device. A drive will pop up on the desktop similar to how a thumb drive pops up on the desktop upon insertion. Right-clicking on this drive and clicking “Get Info” in this drop-down menu will show by “format” what filesystem the image is. Yours would have said “Mac OS X Extended (Journaled)” which equals “HFS+”. And you could have known without burning a single one. But hey! Great news! Those HFS+ CDs you burned can be used in Linux. And I suspect that with the Paragon HFS+ driver or the Boot Camp drivers, Windows could use them too. I ought to test that.

For the thread that birthed this post, go here. Don’t forget to read my post “Answers & Reasons” on page 2 of that forum.

Here’s where I learned to mount HFS+ CDs in Linux. The site also tells how to add an HFS+ CD entry in the fstab in Linux.