CPUs require Windows 10 from Intel Kaby Lake and AMD Bristol Ridge onwards

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: CPUs require Windows 10 from Intel Kaby Lake and AMD Bristol Ridge onwards[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2015/07/windows10-laptop-95x75.png[/newsimage]

Computers with the latest generation processors require Windows 10 to continue to receive support from Microsoft. The company has updated its support policy which now states, " Windows 10 will be the only supported Windows platform on Intel’s upcoming Kaby Lake silicon, Qualcomm’s upcoming 8996 silicon, and AMD’s upcoming Bristol Ridge silicon".

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/cpus-require-windows-10-from-intel-kaby-lake-and-amd-bristol-ridge-onwards-78391/](http://www.myce.com/news/cpus-require-windows-10-from-intel-kaby-lake-and-amd-bristol-ridge-onwards-78391/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Thankfully, Linux developers are realatively quick to support new hardware.
As for Microsoft and their Fuerer, you may place your products in the same warm dark cavity that your heads seem to be firmly inserted into.


#3

[QUOTE=olddancer;2766742]Thankfully, Linux developers are realatively quick to support new hardware.
As for Microsoft and their Fuerer, you may place your products in the same warm dark cavity that your heads seem to be firmly inserted into.[/QUOTE]
Or common sense would rule and to not use Win10.


#4

Does anyone actually USE support from MS? Are they gonna refuse to let us search the KB?


#5

There is something fundamentally wrong with the entire infrastructure of companies that do not see that they are serving customers. As if they think that the customers should rejoice in the fact that we are allowed to be customers. When did minus become plus anyway? I think I will voice you an idea on a very general level just to give you an overview…


We tend to be members of an operating system (OS) camp, which for the most part is wrong.
It is long since I parted OS and technology, but still I notice a little bias out here. Why is it so that any OS is any better than any other? It is not!
One sentence of education: Any OS which does what we expect is a good OS… for its use. I do work much with virtualization as well as security and in that respect, Windows may be too much for the overall resources available to be feasible. For many tasks, even in a Windows environment with above average traffic, splitting functions to secondary servers is typically the path of choice. Does it have to be Windows? No, but most fear each and every new OS that comes their way.

I have thought a little about that on a principal level and how come it can be that way. I do see the answer, we are accustomed to what we have… It is just the wrong answer as we, at the core of it are not doing OS, we are doing the technological aspect of it. In other words, we do know what we want to achieve, we just do not know the chain of commands in all OS to get there. This is how my holistic way of thinking IT is, when a new OS comes along, I read a little about it in the context of where to best put it to use. That is in a sharp contrast to the common sceptics (uncertain-scepticism) out there.

Personally, I think it is time to break it all apart again after collecting for 20+ years. This time to create tight OSes with only one or two functions to take care of the technological aspect we seek, no more. This way, security could be tightened and attack surface narrowed to almost zero for each and every one of the function based OSes. How big does a DNS, DHCP, User Directory or a File server OS have to be?
What we then could have on the top of that is a Control only OS which communicates with the sub-OSes and control the actuall access. I know some think this would be messy, but truth is we would get a better overview. We do that to an extent already today in the form of monitors, trouble is we are monitoring full fledged OSes all the way and I wonder howcome we don’t control and monitor only specialized OSes for just one function from the OS that does just monitoring and control.

Such an approach would leave the client OS intact and only radically change the way we are servicing it.

The thought is not new, still it seems to gain ground and develop way to slow for my taste. I have done some tests using command based OSes (Unix/DOS) and the resources used for a full functional Network was less than half a Windows install. Naturally, I did not have readily access to the control OS which does not exist, but I can imagine we can decentralize it all down to process more for less for the better for all.

As of today, the Linux core in most incarnations seems to be the way to go as they can be trimmed down to almost a cut-down Unix install and still function. The ultimately best would however be to program everything from scratch - Start over so to speak… This time with security in mind from the start and not the patchwork we have.


#6

Serving customers? Ha, old world thinking … go home! :slight_smile:

Other way round - you use an OS service and hell keep your mouth shut as you’re not entitled to complain … this is the new world disorder at least by Msoft. We will see how this user enslavement policy fares before it collapses.

Security is an golden invention - lots of businesses generate money from badly coded Windows. Perhaps all perfectly intended?!

I am pretty sure Windows could run in 512MB ram once all the code bloatware is removed - pure assembler coded it would be lightning fast on current CPUs. But what do we have? watch Windows snail loading into safe mode makes you think of ol’ 8086 (5mhz) times which was about that speed loading up. There are a ton of brake shoes coded into Windows just to make you desire even faster CPUs/hardware.

okey, just my 5cents on this Sunday


#7

[QUOTE=Millennium12;2766753]Serving customers? Ha, old world thinking … go home! :slight_smile:

Other way round - you use an OS service and hell keep your mouth shut as you’re not entitled to complain … this is the new world disorder at least by Msoft. We will see how this user enslavement policy fares before it collapses.

Security is an golden invention - lots of businesses generate money from badly coded Windows. Perhaps all perfectly intended?!

I am pretty sure Windows could run in 512MB ram once all the code bloatware is removed - pure assembler coded it would be lightning fast on current CPUs. But what do we have? watch Windows snail loading into safe mode makes you think of ol’ 8086 (5mhz) times which was about that speed loading up. There are a ton of brake shoes coded into Windows just to make you desire even faster CPUs/hardware.

okey, just my 5cents on this Sunday[/QUOTE]

At a local time just before expiring at the keyboard, LOL, can not make a lunatic go home no matter how ‘old world’ :stuck_out_tongue:
Security, at current, is with every one of us - Only, there are ever so few taking it seriously.
What I find ‘out of tune’ is that I have to tie down everything apart from what I need each time since they are general operating systems. In time, they will become specialized, it just takes way too much time getting there.

As for assembler, how many out there has the required overview and knowledge to lead the project of generating a full OS. I think I am safe in saying that we are looking at a scarce commodity for both management and programming… In other words, that is in reality also ‘old world’ :flower:


#8

Scare comodity? yes, the old world still knew, the new world just pretends to know. There is no excuse.

Okay, off topic - no more comment!


#9

[QUOTE=Millennium12;2766759]Scare comodity? yes, the old world still knew, the new world just pretends to know. There is no excuse.

Okay, off topic - no more comment![/QUOTE]

It is my fault as I tweak the thread and go below OS and discuss technology instead of discussing why Microsoft go the Apple way and choose not to support older OS versions and thus leaving it open for comments such as yours.

Notice how I rarely criticize OS-X, Ubuntu/other Linux distros and Windows general apart from telemetry. It all boils down to one single thing, I love and hate them all at the same time. Hate them because every time I get to them, they are broke. Love them because I love computing and they make it all possible.
It stops there and I criticize Microsoft and Apple at any given opportunity due to their company/sales/customer/whatever policy.

You are right though, strip off the bloat and you can divide the size of windows by at least ten and get ten times or more processing power. In a virtual environment, that would be revolutionary in terms of what we could run on a single physical server.
Frankly, I do have both the knowledge and overview to lead such a project, trouble is where would I find 10-20 knowledgeable assembler programmers, let alone 10-20 taking the risk on an initially non-payed project that ultimately may fail?


#10

Yep, me one of them too - I did assembler and was in bit level engineering back at that time in the 80ies. I was specialised in big tape stations.

However, that’s the past gone with the wind (read old world :wink:
Nowadays, they don’t even know (exactly) what assembler is. It should be fundamental to learn this coz it’s fundamental to understand how a processor works.


#11

I believe I’ll end up going to some sort of Linux based OS in the future I’m fed up with Microsoft…


#12

I’m concerned about my privacy and being told what applications I can run what a shame it’s come to this I wasn’t a big Microsoft fan boy but I did enjoy the ease of clicking on something and it loads without all the command lines or scripts you’d probably have to type in.


#13

The moral of the story is.
If you want to use an old OS, then stick with old hardware.
Can any company be expected to keep adding new features to an old OS, to support the latest hardware?

Telemetry: You would think this is something new, and hasn’t gone on before.
The first MS OS I used was Win 98SE, MS was gathering telemetry then, and have done so for every OS since then, and perhaps before 98SE.

The only difference is Windows 10 asks you to agree to telemetry gathering.


#14

[QUOTE=Dee;2766793]The moral of the story is.
If you want to use an old OS, then stick with old hardware.
Can any company be expected to keep adding new features to an old OS, to support the latest hardware?

Telemetry: You would think this is something new, and hasn’t gone on before.
The first MS OS I used was Win 98SE, MS was gathering telemetry then, and have done so for every OS since then, and perhaps before 98SE.

The only difference is Windows 10 asks you to agree to telemetry gathering.[/QUOTE]

I do not generally disagree with you in your first point, but Microsoft has been far more willing to support older OSes for new hardware earlier when compared to Apple and so it is worth mentioning that they now copy the Apple approach - Sack it even when within the support period.

Telemetry has been going on long Dee, actually from Windows 95 (Windows 1.x, 2.x and 3.x did not have that afaik), but it used to be acceptable levels of information harvested when updating Windows - Necessary information for keeping the operating system up to date. Not like now when they harvest to the extent of it becoming spying.

That is what you seem to defend and I criticize. Nothing I really care about if anyone want to ‘give a shit’ about as I do not preach religion.
However, I have to tell people that each and every program launch now is reported, each and every install you do as well and so forth. I must also tell them that if they use Wi-Fi sense which Microsoft enables by default on Windows 10 they will be sharing the logon to your Wi-Fi network with your facebook friends, Skype and Outlook.com contacts, It is correct that you have to actively choose to share your Wi-Fi network by clicking a box that says “Share network with my contacts” when logging in, but I still find it a security threat.
The same thing goes for the Microsoft store asking your Windows password. It freaks me out after educating users for 20 years to never reveal their password to anyone, not even me as I never will need it. Then Microsoft comes sailing along on a banana shell and simply asks them to input their logon password, now how is that for follow up???


#15

Originally Posted by Dee
The moral of the story is.
If you want to use an old OS, then stick with old hardware.
Can any company be expected to keep adding new features to an old OS, to support the latest hardware?

Telemetry: You would think this is something new, and hasn’t gone on before.
The first MS OS I used was Win 98SE, MS was gathering telemetry then,
and have done so for every OS since then, and perhaps before 98SE.

The only difference is Windows 10 asks you to agree to telemetry gathering.
I believe maybe I could learn to live with Windows 10 if the EULA didn’t read the following with regards to privacy violations…

“Microsoft collects information about you, your devices, applications and networks, and your use of those devices, applications and networks.
Examples of data we collect include your name, email address,
preferences and interests; browsing, search and file history; phone call
and SMS data; device configuration and sensor data; and application
usage.”

“We may collect information about your device and applications and use it for purposes such as determining or improving compatibility” and “use
voice input features like speech-to-text, we may collect voice
information and use it for purposes such as improving speech
processing.”
or even

 “If you open a file, we may collect information about the file, the application used to open the file, and how long it takes any use [of]it
for purposes such as improving performance, or [if you]enter text, we
may collect typed characters, we may collect typed characters and use
them for purposes such as improving autocomplete and spell check
features.”
When buying new hardware or software some privacy should be expected just my opinion and I don’t understand how this should be an outdated or old way of thinking and yes in previous versions of Microsoft’s Windows Platforms I had knowledge of collection of data but as stated above it was not as invasive or even something to be alarmed about but in Windows 10? no way. Â


#16

[QUOTE=SexyTec14;2766797]When buying new hardware or software some privacy should be expected just my opinion and I don’t understand how this should be an outdated or old way of thinking and yes in previous versions of Microsoft’s Windows Platforms I had knowledge of collection of data but as stated above it was not as invasive or even something to be alarmed about but in Windows 10? no way. [/QUOTE]

I would not have thought of using the actual EULA myself, but you make an excellent point. :clap:
The ultimately most troublesome with it is not what is written though, it is what is between the lines. Let me take one such example from your selection of quotes “[I]…we may collect typed characters and use them for purposes such as improving autocomplete and spell check features.[/I]”

‘[B][I]purposes such as[/I][/B]’? As I understand it, that would be the same as writing ‘[B][I]purposes including, but not limited to[/I][/B]’ and when statements like that get general instead of pinpointed “[I]…we may collect typed characters and use them for improving autocomplete and spell check features.[/I]” it is time to raise a red flag in the name of protecting your privacy.
And before you ask, the rest of the line’s message to make it acceptable actually makes it more troublesome, not less as it serves the purpose of moving the attention away from the real message. :rolleyes:


#17

[QUOTE=Xercus;2766814]I would not have thought of using the actual EULA myself, but you make an excellent point. :clap:
The ultimately most troublesome with it is not what is written though, it is what is between the lines. Let me take one such example from your selection of quotes “[I]…we may collect typed characters and use them for purposes such as improving autocomplete and spell check features.[/I]”

‘[B][I]purposes such as[/I][/B]’? As I understand it, that would be the same as writing ‘[B][I]purposes including, but not limited to[/I][/B]’ …[/QUOTE]

why so complicated? MS just admits they know your files and its contents - the purpose is unimportant (read BS) but legally it looks nicer.


#18

I’m going to Linux very soon but for now I’ll continue to run Windows 7 for me the switch is a no brainier if I really want a secure OS that doesn’t report everything I do by default and maybe even after I was a long Windows user all the way back to Windows 3.11 I’m going to make a change it won’t be easy but I’m sure I’ll be happier and no I don’t game with my PC.


#19

I’m going to Linux very soon but for now I’ll continue to run Windows 7 for me the switch is a no brainier if I really want a secure OS that doesn’t report everything I do by default and maybe even after I was a long Windows user all the way back to Windows 3.11 I’m going to make a change it won’t be easy but I’m sure I’ll be happier and no I don’t game with my PC.


#20

[QUOTE=DoMiN8ToR;2766733]We’ve just posted the following news: CPUs require Windows 10 from Intel Kaby Lake and AMD Bristol Ridge onwards[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2015/07/windows10-laptop-95x75.png[/newsimage]

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/cpus-require-windows-10-from-intel-kaby-lake-and-amd-bristol-ridge-onwards-78391/](http://www.myce.com/news/cpus-require-windows-10-from-intel-kaby-lake-and-amd-bristol-ridge-onwards-78391/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.[/QUOTE]

Hmm so does this mean I can’t run Linux if I have a newer Intel or AMD CPU? Sounds like BS to me.