CPU upgrade

vbimport

#1

I am trying to upgrade the processor on a computer I have. As I was a combat communications specialist in the USAF I have a very good grasp of electronics and after retiring as an auto and small engine mechanic I decided to teach myself computer repair. I do this by trial and error, what I can find on the web, and, when stumped, ask people that know more than I do. I am now stumped.

Question? When I go to Intel’s site and look at the upgrade chart for the motherboard I see the following states the BIOS version as 0401[that is just one of the cpu’s on the chart]

When I go to PCSupport and look at their chart under BIOS version it has 016.

CPU-Z shows the following for the BIOS version: AG91510j.15a.0816.2005.0214.1818

Could someone explain to me what the version numbers from CPU-Z mean, which number represents the BIOS version number.

Then how his translates to what Intel says is the BIOS number[0401]and PCSupport[016]

Why does Intel say one number, others a different number, and CPU-Z show a string of numbers that I can’t find anywhere.:confused::sad:Thanks


#2

I am not sure if I can assist you here as I do not have the board available, but maybe a tool can:

Intel® Board ID Tool: https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/17730

Check it out, maybe that can report it in a way suitable to decide the upgrade paths available… My hunch is that the BIOS version is 0816 from the 14th of February 2005 if I read it correctly.


#3

[QUOTE=Xercus;2770086]I am not sure if I can assist you here as I do not have the board available, but maybe a tool can:

Intel® Board ID Tool: https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/17730

Check it out, maybe that can report it in a way suitable to decide the upgrade paths available… My hunch is that the BIOS version is 0816 from the 14th of February 2005 if I read it correctly.[/QUOTE]

OK, thanks.


#4

[QUOTE=kemperhils;2770194]OK, thanks.[/QUOTE]

This might also help you.

//youtu.be/kOdh6iLm5rQ


#5

[QUOTE=alan1476;2770259]This might also help you.

//youtu.be/kOdh6iLm5rQ
[/QUOTE]

Thanks alan, it was helpful in some areas that I was still trying to understand about using CPU-Z. But it didn’t help with the question of identifying BIOS type. Thanks again.


#6

The number before the year in the long string is the effective BIOS version. According to CPU-Z (which is likely correct), this means you are on BIOS revision 0816. The first big chunk identities the board, the next bit I’m not sure about (maybe a major build version? Or hardware version?), then the relevant BIOS version, then date (and time?).

I’m not sure what PCSupport is…never visited that site, so I don’t know what their formatting is. It’s possible that they’re referring to a very early version of the BIOS that has support for a processor that was already released before the motherboard was released, but I’m not entirely sure. Care to share a link to the specific page that shows “016”?


#7

Will have to find it and then I will post the link. Thanks, that was very helpful.


#8

[QUOTE=kemperhils;2770280]Thanks alan, it was helpful in some areas that I was still trying to understand about using CPU-Z. But it didn’t help with the question of identifying BIOS type. Thanks again.[/QUOTE]

The BIOS is in your motherboard. Yu have to boot into the BIOS usually by pressing the DELETE or F2 button as you boot up, just keep tapping it right after you press the start up button, The BIOS version should be on the first tab. Then you find out exactly what type of motherboard you have and find the support tab in the " Lets say Asus" page and it will give you the latest BIOS version, you upgrade in the BIOS.


#9

[QUOTE=alan1476;2770311]The BIOS is in your motherboard. Yu have to boot into the BIOS usually by pressing the DELETE or F2 button as you boot up, just keep tapping it right after you press the start up button, The BIOS version should be on the first tab. Then you find out exactly what type of motherboard you have and find the support tab in the " Lets say Asus" page and it will give you the latest BIOS version, you upgrade in the BIOS.[/QUOTE]

Thanks.


#10

[QUOTE=Albert;2770282]The number before the year in the long string is the effective BIOS version. According to CPU-Z (which is likely correct), this means you are on BIOS revision 0816. The first big chunk identities the board, the next bit I’m not sure about (maybe a major build version? Or hardware version?), then the relevant BIOS version, then date (and time?).

I’m not sure what PCSupport is…never visited that site, so I don’t know what their formatting is. It’s possible that they’re referring to a very early version of the BIOS that has support for a processor that was already released before the motherboard was released, but I’m not entirely sure. Care to share a link to the specific page that shows “016”?[/QUOTE]

Sorry for the long reply, been busy. I found the site I was referring to but gave you the wrong name, It is CPU World.com. Below is a screen shot of the page I was looking at. Notice under BIOS it has 0016.

Oops, for to give you the link:

http://www.cpu-upgrade.com/mb-Intel/DG41TY.html


#11

So for the system you’re using (the one you ran CPU-Z on), the upgrade path would be the one you found on Intel’s site. That’s for the Intel D915GAG (codename Augsburg) motherboard using an Intel 915G chipset. This board seems to be an OEM part for Gateway computers.

The CPU Upgrade link you provided is for the Intel DG41TY motherboard (a retail motherboard), with an Intel G41 chipset – significantly different, and significantly newer. It’s a very different motherboard with a very different series of BIOS updates – and a different upgrade path altogether.


#12

Sorry for the confusion. No the screen shot is not for the original post. I have another computer I was looking for a Cedar Mill processor that would run W10 on a computer I have. I have discovered that many Cedar Mill porcessors have the definitions that is necessary to run W10, where the Prescott and Williamette don’t. That is what the screen shot is. But the BIOS shows the same BIOS number as the computer in the original post. Notice the BIOS version shown on the screen shot is 0016. That is a different number form the 0816 shown on Intel’s site.

So I was wondering how the 0016 relates to BIOS when Intel’s number is 0816. Hope this makes sense.
Thanks.


#13

You mean, that the sites list the minimum required version, and bigger numbers are newer versions? So 0816 is newer than 0401, and 0401 is newer than 0016?

And a processor that required 0016 or newer would be supported by 0017, 0020, 0100, etc…?

Or am I misunderstanding?


#14

[QUOTE=Albert;2770754]You mean, that the sites list the minimum required version, and bigger numbers are newer versions? So 0816 is newer than 0401, and 0401 is newer than 0016?

And a processor that required 0016 or newer would be supported by 0017, 0020, 0100, etc…?

Or am I misunderstanding?[/QUOTE]

I don’t know:). But maybe what you are saying is the answer. I had thought of that but to go from version 0016 to 0816 seems like a very large number versions. But, I guess, as fast as electronic knowledge progresses it is possible. Thanks.:iagree:


#15

Well, let’s assume EVERYTHING starts from 0000 (when available to the public). Or, in this case, maybe the first version was 0001.

That isn’t to say there were 815 more publicly available versions, right? The build number could jump depending on how many bug fixes happen internally, OR every time something major occurs.

So say adding support for a new group of processors means a giant revision must occur, because you have to validate that they all work, and you’re technically adding a lot of new code to make sure there are no errors. Then you release new processors twice or three times before you drop support. That could bump you from version 0001 to 0301 (imagine each new set of processors means you add 100 to the version number – make it known that it was a significant change).

So from there, processors also have software updates (microcode updates), as well as physical new revisions, meant to correct errors or improve efficiency. So you must once again treat it like you’re supporting all new processors in the latter case. And the microcode updates for existing processors aren’t quite as massive, but it’s still important. Lumped all together, this collection of changes bumps you up to, say, 0676.

Then… You have good, old fashioned bug fixes which can easily take multiple revisions to add. Depending on the severity, it could be bumped up by 1, 5, 10, or by 50. So one major fix (726), 8 smaller fixes (806), one tiny bug (811), and some typos… You’re at 816 builds.

If the processor you want to use was supported out of the gate, then the minimum required version would be something like 0016 (maybe that was the first publicly available version – it’s a tiny enough number). Everything from 0016 on would still support that processor.

But if the processor you wanted – like that late-game Pentium 4 you mentioned – came a while after its original variant, then it could have been 3 major updates in from a board that started on version 0033 & had a few bugfixes, so it could have required 0401. From 0401 where that original support was added, various bug fixes for other hardware were required, along with CPU microcode updates, along with support for new operating systems and new hardware – easily pushed the final release to 0816. But the proc. is still supported under 0816.


#16

[QUOTE=Albert;2770800]Well, let’s assume EVERYTHING starts from 0000 (when available to the public). Or, in this case, maybe the first version was 0001.

That isn’t to say there were 815 more publicly available versions, right? The build number could jump depending on how many bug fixes happen internally, OR every time something major occurs.

So say adding support for a new group of processors means a giant revision must occur, because you have to validate that they all work, and you’re technically adding a lot of new code to make sure there are no errors. Then you release new processors twice or three times before you drop support. That could bump you from version 0001 to 0301 (imagine each new set of processors means you add 100 to the version number – make it known that it was a significant change).

So from there, processors also have software updates (microcode updates), as well as physical new revisions, meant to correct errors or improve efficiency. So you must once again treat it like you’re supporting all new processors in the latter case. And the microcode updates for existing processors aren’t quite as massive, but it’s still important. Lumped all together, this collection of changes bumps you up to, say, 0676.

Then… You have good, old fashioned bug fixes which can easily take multiple revisions to add. Depending on the severity, it could be bumped up by 1, 5, 10, or by 50. So one major fix (726), 8 smaller fixes (806), one tiny bug (811), and some typos… You’re at 816 builds.

If the processor you want to use was supported out of the gate, then the minimum required version would be something like 0016 (maybe that was the first publicly available version – it’s a tiny enough number). Everything from 0016 on would still support that processor.

But if the processor you wanted – like that late-game Pentium 4 you mentioned – came a while after its original variant, then it could have been 3 major updates in from a board that started on version 0033 & had a few bugfixes, so it could have required 0401. From 0401 where that original support was added, various bug fixes for other hardware were required, along with CPU microcode updates, along with support for new operating systems and new hardware – easily pushed the final release to 0816. But the proc. is still supported under 0816.[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the explanation Albert.:bow::slight_smile: That cleared up a lot of confusion on my part.