Correct EFM Encoding Possible?

Is it physically possible to record “Weak Sectors” onto a CD-R, or must they be pressed into a CD. In other words, if CD-R drive manufacturers wanted to, could they create a drive that could write all regular bit patterns correctly?

I’m sure this would be a sensitive topic since they would upset Macrovision. Is it possible that Macrovision makes it “worth their while” for manufacturers to not fix EFM encoder shortcommings?

What if I had a .jpg file (or any type of file) that contained a regular bit pattern? I could write this file to disk, but not be able to read it back? It seems that this would be a defect of the drive, no? I’m sure this is a remote possibility, but I would think it still could happen.

What if I had a .jpg file (or any type of file) that contained a regular bit pattern? I could write this file to disk, but not be able to read it back? It seems that this would be a defect of the drive, no? I’m sure this is a remote possibility, but I would think it still could happen.

Yes, but I think a majority of companies would just say that this is just a one off, just use alternative backup or zip the file (it changes the content structure).

I once had a .bmp a long time ago that couldn’t be read from a DirectCD. I never knew what was up, until now that I analysed it - it had created regular bit patterns. The DirectCD CDRW was fine with many of my backup files until I placed that picture on and I lost the entire backup (DirectCD does not recognise it). From that point I don’t trust packet writing anymore - I now always use multisession and Nero with verify option. I’ll try to find that picture - it’s somewhere in my stack of floppies!

If you can find that .bmp, can I get a copy??? I’ll burn it onto a CD and if it can’t be read, I’ll report it as a problem to Plextor tech support.

i bet they will blame the blank media, companies allways do

Certainly a possibility…not that anyone’s ever going to admit it. :wink:

If Macrovision did, the compaines would most probably loose more money than they gain from Macrovision (or Cdilla)

I seriously doubt that companies like Plextor, Lite-On etc… get any income from Copy Protection companies.
I think it is just cheaper for the companies not to spend money on a chipset that does 100% EFM encoding when drives sell for so little.
I doubt they could recover the money they spent developing it.
Considering how small the market is for people who even know what EFM encoding is.

Cheers

So then, the companies could make one type of more expensive drive that encodes EFM correctly. Then prices are kept low for most consumers, but those that want the extra feature can have it as well for a little extra cost.

but is there any reason (other than backing up games) that you would need correct efm, i dont think i have ever had a file with weak patterens so it could not be read back once burned.

I don’t like the thought that there are certain sequences of bits that my drive can’t write correctly. What’s worse is that the drive will happily write, but never let me know it didn’t do it correctly. Again the chances are remote, but what if RAM was like this? or a hard drive? I’d call it defective.

yes, but ram and hard drives store data differently, so i doubt there would be a problem, i think that is why most backups work from a virtual drive but often not when burned to cd.

There should still be the option to have 100% EFM encoding, even if it is rarely needed. We don’t want inferior products if something can be done to improve them at a bit extra cost.

a bit extra cost=36,33€
I’m really curious about my NOT 100% correct Plex.


I am assuming you mean that your Plex 8/2/20 SCSI does %100 correct EFM encoding.
What proof do you have?

No proof; i’ll get it next week (hope so).
And sorry, no, I’ve read the other threads, where Parker describes the ‘weakness’ of the Plex with some patterns (shouldn’t have written “NOT”, my mistake)
I only wanted to show, that it’s (still) not THAT difficult, to get one of the best (known) writers for Safedisc.

Yes, but those drives are no longer produced. Eventually they will all break or be horded by safedisc enthusiasts. :stuck_out_tongue: There is no reason for manufacturers not to make sure that NEW hardware can encode EFM patterns to the best of their ability.

I am looking forward to it.
I hear ppl talking about this drive but am not sure if the rumours are true :wink:

I think it’s sad but true what bcn 246 said; there is also no reason for them to change that. But i am not in the marketing(or law ?)-department of those manufacturers. We will see … with DVD (100% EFMplus :wink: :wink: )

@KitnaIsntHappy
To look forward and to be curious, in that case reflects the same feeling
(I assume that was terrible english :slight_smile: )

Some weak sectors are due to simplifications in manufacturers’ chipsets, but
weak sectors come originally from a default in the CD standard so there’s
nothing much to do against this. If you want to complain to a drive manufacturer,
try burning and reading back this file : http://www.ixbt.com/optical/magia-chisel/badfile.zip
The explanation is at http://www.digit-life.com/articles2/magia-chisel/ , and this is a real drive bug.

@spath
I am too much a beginner (even with the CD standards) to complain anyone. But even with my limited imagination (don’t dear to say knowledge :slight_smile: ) i am not dreaming of a device that’s changing the contents of those funny coloured books :slight_smile:
I was just wondering about whether there are dicussions concerning game protections at all (in those departments)