Copying audio files to CD

Hello All:

I am hopeful that someone can help me solve my problem. I need to copy a cd so that I can put it in my car on mygig hd. The mygig hd will read a cd and import it onto the hard drive. The mygig radio also has the Gracenotes database on it. When I insert a cd into the player in the car, the cd is read and copied onto the hard drive. This particular cd: Paul Hardcastle 5 comes up as track1, track2, track3, etc. Normally, I should see the names of the records that are on the CD. Howver, I don’t for this particlar cd. I was told I need to copy this cd and edit it tags. I can’t figure out how to do that or what program I can use to do it. It appears that these tags must be copied along with the record in order for it to be seen by the system. Can someone please tell me how to accomplish this task. Thanks in advance for any and all responses.

You can rip the Cd with EAC, http://www.exactaudiocopy.de/, to your computer hard drive and under the Tools option you will see Edit Tags. EAC also comes with an option to use the FreeDB data base to look up tag information. There is a chance that for this CD there is no information available and you’ll have to manually edit the tags. Then burn a copy of the CD and try it.

If you do your ripping with EAC on a computer connected to the web EAC will do the database lookup online.

The onboard “gracenote” in your car audio system is probablt out of date and won’t recognize CD’s newer than the software package it has.

that was the problem that the Sony MEX-1GP and MEX-1HD
head units had with their onboard gracenote.

for mp3 files I’d recommend TagScanner to do your tag editing.

It’s a free downloadable program

You can find it on cnet.

[QUOTE=Whappo;2234114]You can rip the Cd with EAC, http://www.exactaudiocopy.de/, to your computer hard drive and under the Tools option you will see Edit Tags. EAC also comes with an option to use the FreeDB data base to look up tag information. There is a chance that for this CD there is no information available and you’ll have to manually edit the tags. Then burn a copy of the CD and try it.[/QUOTE]

Hi Whappo:

I tried what you said, It still doesn’t see the name of the record, it continces to see track1, track2, etc. I copied the file to the hard drive, however, I don’t see anything else in the directory ( a file containing the names of the cuts on the cd). It may be the way that I am burning the cd. Any other suggestions?

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2234300]If you do your ripping with EAC on a computer connected to the web EAC will do the database lookup online.

The onboard “gracenote” in your car audio system is probablt out of date and won’t recognize CD’s newer than the software package it has.

that was the problem that the Sony MEX-1GP and MEX-1HD
head units had with their onboard gracenote.

for mp3 files I’d recommend TagScanner to do your tag editing.

It’s a free downloadable program

You can find it on cnet.

Hi Allan:

      My mygig database was updated recently, in addition, it was updated after this cd was released. In any event, I tried it with another cd I had and it didn't find that cd either. Any other suggestions?

Can your stereo save already compressed and tagged mp3 files?
or is it like the Sony’s MEX-1HD that will only save Sony’s unique ATRAC3 file format to it’s internal 10gb HDD.

The whole thing with the two Sony units was that the relationship between Sony’s product people and the record company they also own is sorta like performing auto-fellatio while a team of lawyers and Doctors advise them to use a rubber to prevent catching a disease.

The whole thing was so handcuffed by their own desire to make it capable while maintaining DRM integrity that it was doomed to fail in the market place.

I am not familiar at all with your particular unit nor do I see enough information so that I can research it (to read the manual myself)
and then offer suggestions.

Frankly I think the whole point of an internal HDD or SSD inside a stereo head unit became moot with the introduction of stereo head units that have either a direct BACKPLANE interface cable to slave control an iPod OR a USB cable to control some other portable audio device like it was any other plug-in accessory (like a CD changer)

That and “Multi-media” decks that’ll play a DVD Disc filled with mp3 files like the Sony MEX-DV2000 or similar.

4.7Gb on a removeable optical disc beats a 1gb internal HDD
and would give a 10gb HDD that would allow open source audio
files (mp3’s) a run for it’s money.

AD

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2236527]Can your stereo save already compressed and tagged mp3 files?

or is it like the Sony’s MEX-1HD that will only save Sony’s unique ATRAC3 file format to it’s internal 10gb HDD.

The whole thing with the two Sony units was that the relationship between Sony’s product people and the record company they also own is sorta like performing auto-fellatio while a team of lawyers and Doctors advise them to use a rubber to prevent catching a disease.

The whole thing was so handcuffed by their own desire to make it capable while maintaining DRM integrity that it was doomed to fail in the market place.

I am not familiar at all with your particular unit nor do I see enough information so that I can research it (to read the manual myself)
and then offer suggestions.

Frankly I think the whole point of an internal HDD or SSD inside a stereo head unit became moot with the introduction of stereo head units that have either a direct BACKPLANE interface cable to slave control an iPod OR a USB cable to control some other portable audio device like it was any other plug-in accessory (like a CD changer)

That and “Multi-media” decks that’ll play a DVD Disc filled with mp3 files like the Sony MEX-DV2000 or similar.

4.7Gb on a removeable optical disc beats a 1gb internal HDD
and would give a 10gb HDD that would allow open source audio
files (mp3’s) a run for it’s money.

AD[/QUOTE]

Hi Allan:

Yes, my unit can save already compressed and tagged mp3 files. It has found every other CD that I have put in it. It does not find the information to this CD. When it goes out on the internet, it finds the names and titles, however, it does not burn it to the disc so that the MYGIG system can read it.