Copy Protections SEGA SATURN - Soundcard & IDE

vbimport

#1

CDRWIN won’t read any of the ring sectors for me. :frowning:

Don’t know if I have a drive that I could use the swap trick on either… although I have a really crazy idea, so bear with me!

I have this really old 2x CD drive which interfaces through some old soundcard on ISA motherboards. Is there any chance that I’d be able to hack this beast to read the ring area as audio and get a raw dump of it, via rigging up an old PC with DOS or an early version of Windows?

My guess is that the drive can’t read subchannels - or do much else, for that matter.

Slap me if that was the stupidest idea ever! :wink:


#2

If the drive outputs only to a sound card, then the output would only be a .wav file, not the data as required.


#3

It can read data as well, although how I’m not quite sure. It’s really old - I don’t have much idea how it works! It uses a port like that of a standard IDE drive, but needs the soundcard as an interface.


#4

That makes absolutely no sense, but if it works like any other IDE drive, then that shouldn’t be a limit.


#5

If the drive outputs only to a sound card, then the output would only be a .wav file, not the data as required.

That makes absolutely no sense, but if it works like any other IDE drive, then that shouldn’t be a limit.
My 1st PC came withoud soundcard and without CD-ROM drive…

I bought a Creative kit with both of them, in which CD readings arrived the CPU via kinda IDE like interfase through the SoundBlaster at 16 bit-slot. :wink:


#6

[offtopic]

> Chriso - Back when Multimedia was starting, in 1992-1994 many, many soundcards came with IDE interfaces on them (particularly ISA cards - the interface in use before PCI) purely for building up a multimedia system (including CD-ROM) and the soundcard would usually include access drivers for mscdex.exe (Microsoft CD extensions)…

But I doubt this system would be too effective in ripping this data. I have found that to rip outside the boundaries specified by the TOC the swap trick must be used. Old SCSI drives are usually very solid readers. I have a Yamaha 4x2x6 which is very good at low speeds, and of course the plextors.

Has anybody tried using the swap trick to read 80min of mode 2 / 2352 data using Clone. Clone usually skips across the unwritten part of the disk very very fast if 100 sector error skip is turned on. Read TOC using a 77 min mode 2 2352 disk then swap it out for the saturn one… use a sheep 2 or better reader if possible. (Regular BIT patterns -> EFM) OR FAILING THAT make a cdrw with >280000 mode 2/2352 then to 77 min mode1/2352 OR audio/2352 (so the RING part is reading in a different format to the main program part) both times using swap method again (read toc from the cdrw and then swap for the saturn disc)

Good luck - Arch


#7

Back when Multimedia was starting, in 1992-1994 many, many soundcards came with IDE interfaces on them
Hmm… sure it was IDE?

I never managed to use the drive on another controller or different drives on soundcard’s built-in.


#8

I think the drive which I was referring to is very similar to the types mentioned above. It’s definitely not IDE, because starting the computer with it connected to an IDE slot never resulted in a successful boot!

It connects via a soundcard in an IDE port. It identifies itself as a Matsushita 2x CD-ROM.

I don’t know what capabilities such an early drive would have - whether it can read Mode 2, subchannels or multisession discs and so on. My guess is that it probably can’t do much more complicated that reading audio (not sure if it can do digital) and Mode 1 data - but who knows? :wink:


#9

It connects via a soundcard in an IDE port.

Should read “a soundcard in an ISA port”. :smiley:


#10

You’ve confused IDE with ATAPI. IDE is a general interface, known by that 40-pin connector, that connects a device to a host. ATAPI is a specific type of IDE interface that allows a CD-ROM drive or other device to connect to a host.

Your computer’s IDE controller does not recognize the drive because it is not a ATAPI (or otherwise supported) device.


#11

Are you guys sure that this wasn’t a sound card with a SCSI interface? I believe I had a Soundblaster sound card with a SCSI adapter built in. As a matter of fact, now that I mentioned it, I know the sound card came with a SCSI interface because that’s how I connected my first CDROM drive to my old 486. A whopping 3x drive, damn thing required the CD’s to be inserted into plastic “boots” in order to run them. PITA having to take a CD out of the boot when wanting to insert a different CD (couldn’t afford more than a few of the boots).


#12

To all members,

Since the Sega Saturn thread is very long already and the above was slightly off top, so they’re moved here.

Please bear in mind, this thread is to only discuss about the Soundcard & IDE.

I do have one of those ISA card. It’s the Creative SB 16 with IDE slot and I confirm the interface is an IDE/ATAPI - I can connect only a CDROM (4x Matshita) to it under Win95. Device manager displays an extra IDE port.

Having said that, there were different variations of Creative SB 16 and some did have proprietary slots, read here:
http://www.pcguide.com/ref/cd/confProprietary-c.html


#13

Are you guys sure that this wasn’t a sound card with a SCSI interface? I believe I had a Soundblaster sound card with a SCSI adapter built in.
Existed, but I rememer it was twice as expensive as the propietary one, I had to discard it as a choice for me when at store.

BTW, I remember boxes shown MPC-2 compliant logos, which I doubt meaning MMC-2 compatible.