Copy Issue

Hello Every Body, I have a DVD copy on my hard around 7.8G ( it is files under the "Video-TS " directory, combination of BUP, IFO ando VOB files), I have used DVDFaB and even DVD shrink to convert it to 4.3 (same format) then write it on DVD, but always when I place it in my DVDplayer (connected to TV), the Player message is that the DVD can not be played!!! It plays in computer , but why not on my DVD player? I used DVDFab, then Shrink, same message always!!!

I have not changed anything on default of these softwares, Am I missing some thing? any idea why this is happening?
Thanks
:slight_smile:

What country is this DVD from? Your DVD player may not be able to play PAL format DVDs. The DVD drive on computer does not have this issue and can play NTSC and PAL format

You may need a program to convert from PAL to NTSC format

The DVD is US Video show, but I belive those two softwares will convert to NTSC even if it is different from NTSC, Isnt it?

Sometimes it is a low quality media problem .
Did you use Verbatim AZO or TY to record on ?

Next what are your standalone DVD players capabilities ?
Meaning can it play both + & - R or RW discs ?

Last AFAIK neither of those softwares converts PAL to NTSC .
Since DVDShrink is old I know this isn’t something it does.
If DVDFab now does this it is a recent addition.

You may be confusing the ability to make a disc region free with the PAL to NTSC conversion.
I gave that a try a couple of months ago & it was a PITA . It never worked to my satisfaction.

[QUOTE=r2535;2664525]The DVD is US Video show, but I belive those two softwares will convert to NTSC even if it is different from NTSC, Isnt it?[/QUOTE]

Neither of those programs can convert between PAL and NTSC.

If it’s a region 1 disc you have, then it’s NTSC, if it’s otherwise then it could be either.

[B]Wombler[/B]

[QUOTE=cholla;2664529]Sometimes it is a low quality media problem .
Did you use Verbatim AZO or TY to record on ?

Next what are your standalone DVD players capabilities ?
Meaning can it play both + & - R or RW discs ?

Last AFAIK neither of those softwares converts PAL to NTSC .
Since DVDShrink is old I know this isn’t something it does.
If DVDFab now does this it is a recent addition.

You may be confusing the ability to make a disc region free with the PAL to NTSC conversion.
I gave that a try a couple of months ago & it was a PITA . It never worked to my satisfaction.[/QUOTE]
My Player plays all kinds, it is Panasonic. I am not sure it could be the Pal/NTSC problem. Even I used DVDFab with same issue. How can I say it is Pal/NTSC? I checked the DVD region as Free Region on DVDFab, that is really Wierd, I am not sure how can I say it is PAL or not.

[QUOTE=r2535;2664577] I am not sure how can I say it is PAL or not.[/QUOTE]

What country is the DVD originally from? You say it a US Video show but did not say what country you get it from. The actual DVD will have a icon of a globe with a number inside.

If it from US or Canada it will have a globe and a number 1 inside which will be NTSC format. If it has a globe with number 2 inside then it will be PAL format

It’s always helpful to know what type of assets you are working with in order to go about moving on through
the next steps.

MediaInfo is a great tool (free) that will tell you what you have to start with.

Once you know what you have it will be much easier to know what to do next.
If your video is 7GB then it needs to be transcoded to a lower bit rate. DVD Shrink used to sort-of-work to
reduce the file size, but the resulting video quality was never all that great. In DVDFab Decrypter there is a
quality setting that allows you to select DVD9 or DVD5 but I’m not sure it it actually reduces the original file
sizes or not.

I’ve always had great results using DVDRebuilder (Free version available) to backup a DVD9 video on to a
DVD5 disc.

Let us assume that your video clips are NTSC DVD compliant. Then you next need to make sure that you are
burning to ISO9660 + UDF and UDF version 1.02

If you video turns out to be PAL then you must convert PAL to NTSC which is a fairly complex conversion.
There are many discussions in this forum about PAL to NTSC.

[QUOTE=AGJ;2664618]If it has a globe with number 2 inside then it will be PAL format[/QUOTE]

Region 2 can be either although it’s more usually PAL.

In general all our A/V equipment over here supports both PAL and NTSC so it’s common enough to see material originally recorded in the US also released here in NTSC format.

[B]Wombler[/B]

Actually, the original post describes a situation that isn’t the Player or the Disk, but the TV’s electronics that refuse to play a PAL-encoded video.

A good many flat-screens are being delivered with those electronics embedded now - they’re not just refusing to play because of Region Codes, but now they can detect PAL vs NTSC encoding, and refuse to allow consumers to watch what they want.

Instead of letting the TV makers dictate what we’re allowed to watch, when we go shopping, we take along a crummy li’l $30 Coby DVD player, its component cables, a couple of Region-Zero PAL DVDs and insist the sales folks hook the gear up to our first choices of flat-screens. We can see the Player pass LOAD then PLAY, and then watch the Flat-Screen display “INVALID DISK” or “NO DISK” after the Coby’s flashed “PLAY”. So we know it’s the TV making the decision.

We get the salesman to hook it up to a different model and then others, if need be, until we find units that allow us to watch OUR entertainment on OUR schedule.

Truly, the restrictions for Region Encoding and PAL vs NTSC are nonsense - do gov’ts think the Balance Of Trade is dependent on DVD or BluRay sales? That a few tanks and fighter planes aren’t the REAL cause for trade imbalances, or the real reason cash flows one way instead of the other?

Apparently so…

“We can eradicate our gold reserve losses by refusing to let Rhett walk out on Scarlett while he’s dubbed in Mandarin!”

It’s really only North America that this PAL vs NTSC issue affects the most, which in the past has always been because of lack of PAL support in the hardware.

Historically this has been due to the fact that North America is such a large market that they build TVs etc specifically for this area and they’re able to get away with not bothering to include PAL support (which I can see the logic of as this saves on electronics).

TBH I hadn’t heard of this deliberate hardware limitation and I’ve no idea why they’d choose to block this in hardware in the US.

The region restrictions on DVDs were primarily to prevent people in other countries buying discs from the US sooner and more cheaply than they could get them in their own countries.

I can’t see the logic in doing it the other way around though to block US customers which is what that hardware restriction would be doing.

Are you sure the TV is actually blocking inbuilt PAL support or is it perhaps just politely advising that the hardware isn’t capable of playing PAL?

[B]Wombler[/B]

I guess I need to get a commercial PAL DVD to test with .
I wonder if there are Region 1 PAL DVDs ?
Or is it possible my DVD standalone(made for the US) would play
a different region PAL ?
I actually don’t know .
I think the main reason for the PAL blocking would be to prevent cheaper purchase from foreign countries . The copyright royalties might also be less . I’m sure the reason is trackable to some kind of economic loss to those making the money in the US.

I am not saying it is, but if its a torrent you downloaded, this is just a hypothetical situation I am rendering here, it will play on your computer but not in your Standalone. You have to run it through ConverteXtoDVD 5 to make it compatible. Please do not think I am saying you did that but its just one reason why it might not play. :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=cholla;2665458]I wonder if there are Region 1 PAL DVDs ?[/QUOTE]

No, as the vast majority of equipment in the US doesn’t support PAL. You could create one easily enough though by taking a PAL disc, ripping it, then changing the region in PgcEdit.

Or is it possible my DVD standalone(made for the US) would play
a different region PAL ?

Some models support PAL playback but then the TV also has to support it as well.

Other DVD players support PAL to NTSC-50 conversion which will play on NTSC TVs and this is probably the easiest option for anyone wanting to play PAL DVDs in Region 1.

For completeness though I should add that the player also has to be made region free although this can normally be done on any of the models that support conversion otherwise there wouldn’t be much point in having that feature. :wink:

Some of them are region free out of the box, others may require a simple remote control hack.

I think the main reason for the PAL blocking would be to prevent cheaper purchase from foreign countries . The copyright royalties might also be less . I’m sure the reason is trackable to some kind of economic loss to those making the money in the US.

In most instances it’s just that the PAL hardware support isn’t there.

[B]Wombler[/B]

Good answers Wombler .

I was just trying to figure out what to look for if I bought a PAL commercial disc
For me it would just be for testing purposes . If they were common in the US I would already have one.

I did a download a while back of some legal PAL DVD that is for testing .
They are a couple of short anamations. Of course they are burned to a DVD -RW.
This disc is region free per Neroinfotool. It will play from my LG player & my Magnavox DVRs The LG is connected via component & upconverts also.
The Magnavox’s one is component & the other composite (I ran out of jacks).
The test DVD plays in all of them. To a Sharp Aquos TV.

So I already know that PAL is not a problem.
I just need to get me a commercial pressed PAL DVD to work with.
Since I don’t have one I’ve never tried to make the DVD units region free.

This is a link to the PAL test DVD I downloaded:

Kerry56 gave me the link .

That’s a calibration disc for HDTV so it looks like it’s HiDef video on DVD as it uses MPEG4.

Normal DVDs can only use MPEG2.

If you’re only wanting a disc for test purposes just order the cheapest one you can source online.

Alternatively you could buy something that you want to see and maybe pay a bit more.

Most Region 2 discs are PAL but as mentioned above you’ll need to check and confirm as we have NTSC discs here as well.

I had a quick look on the US version of eBay and found a few cheap ones available.

[B]Wombler[/B]

I also gave a short look on Ebay & may order one.
I think I will get one I actually want to watch.
That way I can rip it & burn it region free even if it doesn’t play
from the commercial DVD on my players.
This is the text file from MediaInfo with the calibration.iso opened in VirtualClone.
It shows to be MPEG2.
General
Complete name : J:\VIDEO_TS\VTS_01_1.VOB
Format : MPEG-PS
File size : 746 MiB
Duration : 9mn 56s
Overall bit rate mode : Variable
Overall bit rate : 10.5 Mbps

Video
ID : 224 (0xE0)
Format : MPEG Video
Format version : Version 2
Format profile : Main@Main
Format settings, BVOP : Yes
Format settings, Matrix : Default
Format settings, GOP : M=3, N=12
Duration : 9mn 56s
Bit rate mode : Variable
Bit rate : 10.1 Mbps
Maximum bit rate : 8 000 Kbps
Width : 720 pixels
Height : 576 pixels
Display aspect ratio : 16:9
Frame rate : 25.000 fps
Standard : PAL
Color space : YUV
Chroma subsampling : 4:2:0
Bit depth : 8 bits
Scan type : Progressive
Compression mode : Lossy
Bits/(Pixel*Frame) : 0.974
Stream size : 718 MiB (96%)

Audio
ID : 189 (0xBD)-128 (0x80)
Format : AC-3
Format/Info : Audio Coding 3
Mode extension : CM (complete main)
Format settings, Endianness : Big
Muxing mode : DVD-Video
Duration : 9mn 56s
Bit rate mode : Constant
Bit rate : 192 Kbps
Channel(s) : 2 channels
Channel positions : Front: L R
Sampling rate : 48.0 KHz
Bit depth : 16 bits
Compression mode : Lossy
Stream size : 13.6 MiB (2%)

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Looks like it’s just a normal DVD so you should be okay with that for test purposes.

That’s unusual though as most HD calibration DVDs use HD video stored on DVD discs in a hybrid format.

[B]Wombler[/B]

[QUOTE=Wombler;2665545]Looks like it’s just a normal DVD so you should be okay with that for test purposes.

That’s unusual though as most HD calibration DVDs use HD video stored on DVD discs in a hybrid format.[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]

The burned copy stays PAL & plays fine as I posted above.
Looks some better when upconverted with the LG player.

If you have a link to a hybrid HD calibration disc . I would give it a go if it is free.

Buying a commercial PAL DVD is on my to do list now . I’m not in a hurry & will find a movie I want .