Computer buiding help

vbimport

#1

i want to start building a computer could u guys please help me all i need to know is what part i should by first,second,third and so on,i dont have enough money to buy the peices at once so the comp will be put together a little bit at a time :frowning:


#2

case
psu
motherboard
cpu
ram
gfx card
hdd
cables
keyboard
mouse
monitor

Please have also a look into the hardware forum.


#3

Hey chef, you forgot the ODD!!! :bigsmile: :doh: :wink:


#4

ok thanks but what is a psu,and a odd(sorry this is my first time)and one more question is there any soldering involved or is it all connect


#5

Sorry, [B]bounce7769 :slight_smile: . [/B] PSU = Power Supply Unit and ODD = Optical Disc Drive. Building from scratch takes some experience, so it may not be your best option right now. If you’re going to buy one piece at a time, the first will be outdated by the time you get the last. Give us an idea of what you’re using right now, maybe there’s some stuff you can “recycle”.


#6

ok maybe i wont build i will probably just save up for one thanks anyways guys


#7

purchasing a barebones kit off of newegg.com might be a good idea for a beginner. at least then you know the major components are compatible.


#8

That’s a good idea, as it’s somewhere between buying a fully built comp, and building your own. :slight_smile:


#9

do they come with the stuff i need or do i still need to buy the neccesary items


#10

I agree with reasons and Arachne, a barebones system sounds like a great compromise. Bounce, I recommend you read up a little and get a feel for what’s involved and maybe have a little familiarity with the various components that chef so nicely listed.

Click on Build Your Own PC. It’s a guide I just found and took a quick look at…doesn’t look too bad for starters, might be a little dated. Do you have access to a pc at all…something you could just pop the panel off and look at while referring to the guide?


#11

a prebuilt from Dell, eMachines or HP are the cheapest way to get everything - and probably the best way for someone as new as you to startout-eh!

Mike


#12

When i built my first one i started out by reading magazines. If you check the newsstands you can usually always find one that will take you step by step on what to do. I think Maximum PC is a good one. Not too technical but really informative.


#13

I would have to disagree cressida, I built my first PC with no experience what-so-ever I bought the necessary, read through all the manuals, and had them next to me as I built and asked a lot of questions in the shop first to clarify where I was confused. IT is the one advantage of using a physical small part supplier, they are there to talk to and their business relies on word of mouth and so they tend to be more helpful.

When I built my first PC I couldn’t wire a plug, I still can’t without an example next to me I can never remember where the brown and blue wires go, earth is the easy one.

big mike is correct though. The price advantage of self build is gone now so the only advantage is for tailoring the system for your needs. If you just wnat to do avarage PC stuff then a shop bought one will be best if saving money is what you were thinking about.


#14

you can also first practise on the computer you have now (if there is no warenty on it any more)

take everything out of your casr right down exactly what you did, so you cant go wrong, watch out for static electricity it can dammage some parts. when you think your skilled enough then you can alway’s built a new computer


#15

Fitting the pieces together is the easy part uru things canonly go in one way, it is the jumper/switch settings on the motherboard that need to be changed and requires the manual.


#16

i learnd on my school that if you wright down everything exectly what you did you cant go wrong


#17

I think both JayC30 and Bignike7 are absolutely correct! For a PC shop there isn’t a lot of money in Pre Built Systems because it’s a very competitive market and a lot of price cutting is going on. They make most of there $$$$ on the parts they sell and have quite a high margin on PC parts. Of a average PC it cost a lot more to buy the parts and build it your self then buy a ready made one. It’s bit like buying a Ford motor car, you can buy it for a quarter of the price new from a car dealer, than if you brought all the parts and put it together your self and that’s not including your time putting it together


#18

it is still possible to save money by building vs. buying

there are deals to be had on components (ie. 6 months ago when I built mine I got an AMD 3700 and SLI motherboard combo for $250 with no MIRs, which at the time was almost what the processor alone was going for)

there is also the possibility of recycling components from your old system too

and finally, you must take into account that most of the good deals on prebuilt computers are due to MIRs, so you have to shell out a lot more, then hope that the rebate comes through, not to mention you will most likely need to get a video card since nearly all prebuilts have integrated video :Z


#19

That may be true in the US but not the UK our consumer law is very strong, plus we don’t have rebates. What the hell is MIR? Those with intergrated have to say so, and they are the realy budget PCs anyway.


#20

i think my computer needs a new fan in back it always feels like its so hot back there and plus my comp keeps restarting every so often,how hard is to put a new fan on