Compression Ratio?

Hi all

I new to the DVD burning scene and I have a question about compression ratios.

Using my copy of Star Wars Episode I and FutureProof’s Guide to DVD Shrink (Ver 3 beta 5), I managed to get rid of all the menus, extras, begining intro, credits, and unnecessary sound and subtittles.

What I was left with was I think 71-72% compression (I know it was above 70%).

So my question is, what does that mean in the real world? Will the picture quality be good, ok, or horrible compared to the original?

Any and all responses would be appreciated.

It all depends on the movie itself. I’ve done copies at 47% that have no loss of quality, and others at 60% that do have some problems. I all depends on the amount of action, or picture information, in the movie. Generally, I have no problems if I keep it above 55%.
The only problems I have seen are not loss of picture quality, but break-up of the picture in certain scenes where the camera is panning or there’s a lot of motion. The rest of the movie will have perfect picture quality.

Hi - and welcome to this madhouse;)

With Shrink the bigger the percentage figure the greater the likelihood that the quality will be to your satisfaction. For instance, 60% means that 40% of the original movie has been bludgeoned out of existence. (You might miss 40%, I know I would - and none of your smart talk the rest of you.) 100% means no compression has taken place at all and the movie video is as good as the original.

It’s difficult to quantify the amount of compression that will be acceptable because it depends so much on the quality of the original. Some studios (Sony, for instance) use much higher quality encoders than some others. Some movies are compressed more [by the studios] right from the outset because they are longer in duration and they need to be made to fit the DVD while still leaving room for all that crappo they add in the considerably mistaken belief that it constitutes ‘added value’.

Your own eyes are perhaps the best judge.

-Pete

Thanks for the input.

I know making a 1:1 copy would obviously yield the best results but, most movies these days are dual layered and I don’t feel like spiltting the movie to 2 discs

I guess I just have to wait and “see”, I have yet to write it.

Regarding Shrink v3 b5, in your view do guys think its the best program for what it does - ripping/decrypting/shrinking/encoding?

I’ve copied about 20 movies with it so far, burning in Nero. Ranging from 3 hr action flicks at 50% compression to 1:30 black and white at 100%, have yet to see anything but perfect picture, and I don’t re-author, just cut the audio I don’t want.
I doubt I’ll ever feel the need to try anything else.

^Excellent^

:slight_smile:

If you get auto compression at a level that may seem unsatisfactory, try the variable ratio feature in Shrink. Wind the credits right down and wind up an action scene

they add in the considerably mistaken belief that it constitutes ‘added value’.

Yeah,Pete,‘added value’,more of a justification to sell a DVD for $20 rather than $15…:bigsmile:

Originally posted by rdgrimes
I’ve copied about 20 movies with it so far, burning in Nero. Ranging from 3 hr action flicks at 50% compression to 1:30 black and white at 100%, have yet to see anything but perfect picture, and I don’t re-author, just cut the audio I don’t want.
I doubt I’ll ever feel the need to try anything else.

My experience so far has been the same…makes no diff what software I use the resultant video quality is quite acceptable. I do try to make the compression levels “optimum” but I have had no visually negative experiences yet.