Compressing

vbimport

#1

I was provided with several links to learn how to compress the size of a movie onto a smaller capacity disc (for example, movie runs 140 min, dvd capacity is 120). However, I have been unable to find that information.
Can anyone provide me with that link or the information?

thanks a lot


#2

There is an entire forum about it here.
http://club.cdfreaks.com/f62/
You will see the word transcoding a lot, which is the process of compressing. Personally I use nero recode to compress (its included with nero 7 and 8), and anydvd for copy protection (if it is a copy protected disk). Those are both pay softwares (whatever you use, anydvd is well worth it for the copy protection, if you need it).
As far as free software, there is dvd shrink to compress, and dvd decryptor (rips, gets rid of most older and some newer copy protection, burns etc). It doesn’t have its own forums but you will find tutorials in the guides section of the above link. I think dvd fab has a free version that handles newer copy protection but perhaps someone else can advise about the best current free programs (I have used nero recode and or clone dvd and anydvd for so long I haven’t paid attention to what the best free ones are anymore).


#3

[QUOTE=kdroskinis;2100507]I was provided with several links to learn how to compress the size of a movie onto a smaller capacity disc [B](for example, movie runs 140 min, dvd capacity is 120)[/B]. However, I have been unable to find that information.
Can anyone provide me with that link or the information?

thanks a lot[/QUOTE]

You canniot count on that, important for DVD is the bitrate and resolution of the content/movie.


#4

In other words, you are not necessarily guaranteed to be able to compress a 140 min movie to fit a single layer dvd. Typically there are a lot of extras on the disk that take up a lot of space too. Most will compress enough, but in some cases, you may have to remove some of the extras, or some of the extra language tracks to get it to fit. You can also just copy the main movie without any of the extras.


#5

Use DVDFAB HD Decrypter (free) to rip to hard drive then use DVD Shrink to shrink it down to fit SL, then use ImgBurn to burn it, All Free Programs


#6

Jimbo, thanks for these recommendations. I have been mainly using DVDFab (currently 5.0.7 I think). I am trying to decide to purchase this program, or use free programs as you have suggested. I assume you use those three programs (the free ones) for your dvd needs. How hard would you say it is for a relatively experienced computer user (not a tech person) who is just getting the hang of the burning process, to learn? Just a judgment, but I’d appreciate the feedback.

Thanks


#7

Yo KathiD-

I personally like DVDFab Gold - and have been using it for the past 2+ years (paid version)-

I like the ‘set it and forgetit’ and one button start to do the entire read/write/burn/finalize in about 15 to 30 minutes (depending on complexity of movie being burned)-

I have never had a coaster since I started using the program and have never found a pressed movie to date that I could not burn (over 700 some odd movies to date)-

In my signature below - you will see that I use two burners in my burning computer - the LiteOn 20A4H to read/rip and the Pioneer 115D as the burner-

I also only use Taiyo Yuden 8x and Verbatim 16x medias-


#8

Following up on Jimbo’s suggestion, Post #67 to #74, but please read Post #78.

http://club.cdfreaks.com/f116/dvdfab-5-0-2-2-not-ready-big-league-245636/index3.html


#9

[quote=bigmike7;2101774]Yo KathiD-

I also only use Taiyo Yuden 8x and Verbatim 16x medias-[/quote]

And to enter into the ongoing controversy, do you use -r or +r?

Thanks for the input


#10

[QUOTE=kdroskinis;2102083]And to enter into the ongoing controversy, do you use -r or +r?

Thanks for the input[/QUOTE]

Either works well and for the most part there isn’t a major advantage to either though there are a few points to look at. A few years back, it was discovered that +r has slightly better error correction (which shouldn’t matter so much with good quality disks, but might help just a little with lesser quality disks, especially after age, scratches etc).
The most important thing is which your burner likes, as some drives may like one or the other better (and will get higher quality burns with the preferred format).
Most players these days play + or - just fine, but if you run into compatibility issues (primarily with older players), +r is the least compatible, -r is in the middle, and a +r that has been bitset (falsely identifies itself as a dvd rom even though its a +r). As far as the quality or merits of the format itself, beyond the slight error correction advantage of +r, they are equal and both work fine.


#11

[quote=kdroskinis;2101733]Jimbo, thanks for these recommendations. I have been mainly using DVDFab (currently 5.0.7 I think). I am trying to decide to purchase this program, or use free programs as you have suggested. I assume you use those three programs (the free ones) for your dvd needs. How hard would you say it is for a relatively experienced computer user (not a tech person) who is just getting the hang of the burning process, to learn? Just a judgment, but I’d appreciate the feedback.

Thanks[/quote] I have used those 3 programs in the past but it was a pain in the butt to use 3 different programs so I only use DVDFAB Platinum or sometimes I’ll use DVD NextCopy which those to are a one click of the mouse programs they rip compress and burn all in one program and they both are very easy to use. I also use Verbatim +R media bitset to DVD-ROM which in a sense tricks the players to thinking they are the orignial pressed disc in a way which will play in any player old or new


#12

bitset to DVD-ROM is done in the software, such as DVDFab, right? Also, do you generally use single layer or dual layer in the verbatim? I am still unsure when it is appropriate to use dual layer … when I look at the information breakdown in the DVDFab info window, if the total minutes exceeds 120 then use dual layer, right? or wrong?


#13

Most commercial movies are dual layer. That is the whole reason for compressing them, is to get them to fit on a single layer disk. I have found that most will compress down enough to fit, and for those that don’t, you can usually just remove a few things (I often just remove the foreign language audio tracks), and then they will fit. A very rare few cannot be compressed enough unless you take a lot of the extras out (often ones with non video extras like games on kids movies etc). reasons to use dual layer would be for instance, a movie that absolutely will not fit, or maybe one that you want all the extras, or perhaps its your favorite movie and you want the best possible quality (compression reduces quality a little bit).

As far as verbatims, they are the only good dual layer disk that you will easily be able to find in the US. Single layer verbatims are good too, but there are a few other good single layer disks also.

On the bitsetting, you have to have a drive that is capable of it (many are), and yes you can generally set it in software. Some drives default to bitsetting, while others you will have to set it. After burning a disk, you can check it out with cdspeed or dvd identifier to verify that it did in fact get bitset (you drive may already be doing it by default).


#14

[QUOTE=kdroskinis;2102083]And to enter into the ongoing controversy, do you use -r or +r?

Thanks for the input[/QUOTE]

Yo KathiD-

Both of Both


#15

[QUOTE=kdroskinis;2102922]bitset to DVD-ROM is done in the software, such as DVDFab, right? Also, do you generally use single layer or dual layer in the verbatim? I am still unsure when it is appropriate to use dual layer … when I look at the information breakdown in the DVDFab info window, if the total minutes exceeds 120 then use dual layer, right? or wrong?[/QUOTE]

Yo KathiD-

I have said previously - I have burned over 700+ movies and have never once used DL media - infact have never bought any-

If you use the Taiyo Yuden or Verbatim media with your DVDFab it will compress the movie to a standard 4.7 DVD disc in a very acceptable manner-eh!!


#16

It depends on how much compression is used before I will use a DL< mainley on full disc or clone mode then I’ll use DL> movie only SL


#17

There are lots of variables with compression. A larger and or higher resolution tv is more likely to show compression. It also depends on your eye site as well as your perception. Some people just notice it more than others. In addition, it varies from movie to movie. You can have two movies that are about the same size, and receive about the same amount of compression, but as the scenes very (objects in the scene, brightness etc), one may have a little noticeable compression where the other doesn’t. Personally I think it is most noticeable on close ups of faces. Anime is also suppose to show compression a lot more.
There is no rule of thumb on how much compression is allowable. You just have to try it, pay attention to how much compression is being used, and see if it is noticeable and or bothersome. If it’s bothersome, usa a dual layer disk. Personally, I almost never use dual layer disks, but then again, all my tv’s are standard definition 27" tv’s.