Company wins Emmy for anti-piracy technology – successfully used to find movie leakers

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Company wins Emmy for anti-piracy technology – successfully used to find movie leakers[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2016/01/myce-nexguard-95x75.png[/newsimage]

The company Civolution has received an Emmy for developing a technology to fight movie piracy. Civolution was formerly part of Dutch electronics giant Philips and has received the prize during CES, currently held in Las Vegas.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/company-wins-emmy-for-anti-piracy-technology-successfully-used-to-find-movie-leakers-78332/](http://www.myce.com/news/company-wins-emmy-for-anti-piracy-technology-successfully-used-to-find-movie-leakers-78332/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Cinevia still seems kind of useless to me because I don’t think the majority of people pirate bluray iso’s.  Someone compresses them using x264 and people play them of devices that don’t support cinevia (as cinevia only needs to be included on players that support bluray).

I’m not sure how much the screeners impacted sales.  They were only DVD screeners.  DVD’s don’t look that great on modern tv’s.  I think most movie enthusiast (the sort of people who see movies in the theatre) probably still went.


#3

Well well just reading that link and this company is claiming to individually audio watermark vod streams,live sports streams and even individually audio watermark studio burnt screeners…sounds like a game changer wow.


#4

I must admit, it looks interesting.
Eventually, they are going to find a way around even that of course, and yes, the game is changing - it is normal in the game of encrypt/decrypt.

Ultra secure they say today, about tomorrows throwaway. I can not count the times they have come forth and said it was impossible through the years, only to be proven wrong. As long as it is possible to apply it using a program, there really is no doubt in my mind that it can be reversed.


#5

All this game they play will make Privacy bigger now. Do they think they are that smart. They just make the pirates more happier to take on the challenge and break it. I have yet to see any real solution from the Studio Greed to fix the problem “GREED” motivated profits rather then lower price to induce more sales. All their so called copy protection breaks every-time and yet they seem to have their head up their a55 all the time.


#6

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2766415]All this game they play will make Privacy bigger now. Do they think they are that smart. They just make the pirates more happier to take on the challenge and break it. I have yet to see any real solution from the Studio Greed to fix the problem “GREED” motivated profits rather then lower price to induce more sales. All their so called copy protection breaks every-time and yet they seem to have their head up their a55 all the time.[/QUOTE]I have to agree with with you…:clap::bigsmile:


#7

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2766415]All this game they play will make Privacy bigger now. Do they think they are that smart. They just make the pirates more happier to take on the challenge and break it. I have yet to see any real solution from the Studio Greed to fix the problem “GREED” motivated profits rather then lower price to induce more sales. All their so called copy protection breaks every-time and yet they seem to have their head up their a55 all the time.[/QUOTE]

Yes, it would be better if they introduced some sort of greed protection system but as we all know that’s never going to happen. :bigsmile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#8

I do have to wonder: who do they think DRM will stop? Many illegal movie downloaders will simply use tools like VLC, which will probably never support watermark DRM technologies. If a program does support Cinivia-like schemes, one could presumably revert to an older version of said program and thus solve the problem.

This of course begs the universal question: why? Why do they bother with this technology, when even they must know that there DRM research and development is a complete waste of time and money. Does throwing money into the wind really make up for the profits (supposedly) lost due to mass copyright infringement?