Company announces 100 GB Blu-ray discs as 4K Blu-ray discs

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Company announces 100 GB Blu-ray discs as 4K Blu-ray discs

Singulus issued a press release announcing new machinery for production of triple layer 100 GB Blu-ray discs. The company also states the discs are preferred playback medium for content in UltraHD / 4K.
Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/company-announces-100-gb-blu-ray-discs-as-4k-blu-ray-discs-68754/

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Expect to buy new equipment for BDXL… reading extra layers or finer resolutions on each layer require better equipment not just a firmware tweak. Nevertheless, Before this standard has any traction, expect a new Optical Disc standard ranging from 250gb to 1tb to make it’s way onto the PC scene… If it’s not part of the Blu-ray consortium, it will create a format war of sorts.


#3

Awesome! Now our cinivia-protected (or audio-degraded) movies have even more absolutely rediculous resolution! If you sit three inches from a garadge door-sized TV, I’m sure you’ll see the difference.


#4

Yah the movie/hardware companies seem to really want to push 4k.

I don’t think the world is ready for it. 1080p conversion only happened for the masses in the last 5 years. You need giant tv’s for 4k to have benefit. Cable Companies/Online streaming can’t even offer decent 1080p quality let alone ready for 4k.

I know their’s some videophiles out there that really want it, but I don’t think the masses are eager to get it (I still know lots of people with HDTV’s that only use SD content).

I was all over HD when it got released (and a fairly early adopter back in 2007). It made sense. LCD’s/Plasma’s were fairly new, and HD was the new awesome format for them.

4k needs people to have 80" TV’s (except for the very few people who want to sit 2 feet away from the screen). I don’t see that happening for a while (limited space in living rooms).

As for a 100gb disc. Is that enough. 1080p often used a 50gb disc. I though 4k used about 4x the space?


#5

SD content is typically letterbox (4:3) and that kind of looks horrible on HDTVs when stretched. BTW, you do not need 80" UHDTV to take advantage of 4k… there are fast moving video applications such as sports which are better at 120 frames/second in these higher resolutions than 1080ps 60 frames. Beyond that, it will be debatable that any improvements will be necessary for video as the eyes an not perceive much beyond that.

People might be satisfied with MP3 for audio now, but one day they will crave something that’s higher resolution than 320kbit VBR sources. My guess is mp3 format will expand to support such a higher resolution similar to blue ray’s 7.1ch 48-256bit audio in smaller file sizes.


#6

There are already several very cheap Chinese made 4k TV’s out and the better manufacturers have been forced to drop prices quite a bit on the much nicer sets as a result so at least the video end should be covered for a reasonable price very soon, but yep, getting everything else that’s needed to support it could get ugly for a while.
My next BD burner should support it if I ever can afford to upgrade.


#7

That term 4K is confusing. Better call it 4x Blu-ray since it’s about 4 times as many bytes as 23GB Blu-ray.


#8

[QUOTE=Zod;2700000]…

I know their’s some videophiles out there that really want it, but I don’t think the masses are eager to get it (I still know lots of people with HDTV’s that only use SD content).

I was all over HD when it got released (and a fairly early adopter back in 2007). It made sense. LCD’s/Plasma’s were fairly new, and HD was the new awesome format for them.

…[/QUOTE]

It depends on what kind of masses you choose to emphasize. There are many kinds of masses. Some masses earn US$100K or more per year. Some others earn US$100 or less per year. You said you know lots of people that use only SD. You could have just chosen to say you know lots of people that can make use of 4K right now instead.

Real videophiles need not wait for 4K X 2K TV. They could have bought one or more units long ago.

In 2007, 1080p and Blu-ray were not exactly early. Blu-ray recorders were expensive for the mass, but 1080p was common enough in 2002.

LCD was not something “fairly new” in 2007. Plasma-based TV sets were cheap and everywhere years before LCD. I had a LCD TV capable of 1080p in 2003. I do not mean every home in the Congo Basin by everywhere.

Yah the movie/hardware companies seem to really want to push 4k.

The movie companies have been the very force most reluctant to delay the introduction and mass market adoption of anything beyond HDTV and Blu-ray. Whether they gain or lose because of added standard better than existing ones is difficult to tell, but it’s plain they don’t like anything new.

The needs and desire for higher standard were largely from engineers and entrepreneurs in Japan and movie consumers in the US.