Comache original

Hi,
I have been trying to find a dos game for me and my dad. This game is Comanche subtitled maximum overkill. We first recieved it when we purchased an old 2b x 2a joystick. We loved it, then it got a circular scratch. After contacting Novalogic about the problem they sent us a floppy. That didnt work so we threw it away. Now the game is discontinued. I was wondering if any one knows a place where we can get an exe or iso of the game.

Thank You

I’m sorry but we can’t help you on this here. In order to keep the forum free and pleasant for all a few rules must be followed. Postings on downloading ISOs and such are prohibited as it encourages piracy. I suggest you read on rules of the board here.

That being said if you still have the CD somewhere you can in many cases salvage it using the Skip Doctor, a $20-$30 device which has saved some of my older CDs very well. It has a wheel that polishes the CD recording surface in a radial fashion. Very effective, a must have.

If however, the scratch is on the top surface (where the reflective layer is), it usually is hopeless :frowning:

Perhaps it can be found in the category abandonware, software of which the copyright has expired (abandoned).

This site may be of help in this respect:
http://www.the-underdogs.org/

As much as i liked the old Commanche i think you will have great difficulties running it on a modern up-to-date computer system. NovaLogic had a very weird method of memory management back then (their own little version of dos4gw it seemed).

I’d recommend purchasing Commanche 4 which has been out a couple of months already. This will probably work much better on a modern system.

Originally posted by Mr. Belvedere
As much as i liked the old Commanche i think you will have great difficulties running it on a modern up-to-date computer system. NovaLogic had a very weird method of memory management back then (their own little version of dos4gw it seemed).

Do I remember well, that this game needed 4096k of EMS memory? :wink:

Originally posted by Dee-ehn
[B]

Do I remember well, that this game needed 4096k of EMS memory? :wink: [/B]

i think the trick was that it had its own ems memory management, dunno precisely :slight_smile:

Coktel Vision’s (Inca II) past memory management was built on EMS if i’m not mistaken , but only for the cdrom version…

really crappy stuff :slight_smile:

Originally posted by Mr. Belvedere
[B]As much as i liked the old Commanche i think you will have great difficulties running it on a modern up-to-date computer system. NovaLogic had a very weird method of memory management back then (their own little version of dos4gw it seemed).

I’d recommend purchasing Commanche 4 which has been out a couple of months already. This will probably work much better on a modern system. [/B]

If you have XP you could probably run it if you dual boot to Win98 siince XP won’t run old DOS games natively AFAIK. As an example, a friend of mine was trying to run Duke Nukem 3D on his XP machine but wasn’t successful, but it works without a hitch on 98SE (yes, I still play it myself :slight_smile: .

Originally posted by Da_Taxman
[B]Perhaps it can be found in the category abandonware, software of which the copyright has expired (abandoned).

This site may be of help in this respect:
http://www.the-underdogs.org/ [/B]

Well the situation of abandonware is definitely a subject for discussion. I see the point of the publishers, that it is piracy, like someone stealing your parts truck beacuse its broken down and you’ve left it in a field somewhere. But I can also see the abandonware advocates’ point of view as well. I found an interesting discussion about it on CNET here, especially this quote from the article (page two, “pirates”):

Give the Gamers What They Want

Kenyon and his cohorts believe they are providing a public service. For example, on a site affiliated with Kenyon’s Web ring, a FAQ cites the example of a gamer named John, who, in a moment of nostalgia, decides to reinstall a game he purchased and played years earlier. Unfortunately, although the disks have since become corrupt, the publisher refuses to replace them. Because of situations like this, Kenyon feels he is filling a gap created by publishers when they stop supporting older titles.

This seems to mirror exactly goten722’s case!

Good subjet for a living room discussion about policy, it seems :slight_smile: