Clone or Full Disc on DVDFab?

vbimport

#1

Noob Question: Which is the best option to use on DVD Platinum? Clone or Full Disc? I have a Dual Layer DVD driver. What’s the pros and cons of each?


#2

Hi infernox
Clone will copy everything that is on the disc even the region code
Full movie takes all that stuff off and just gives you the menus ,Main Movie, Previews and subpictures(sub-titles

Tim


#3

Thanks Tim. What option would you use most if you want a full complete backup of your originals? DL discs cost is not an issue.


#4

If it’s a really good movie I myself would use DVD9 so there is no compression, I very really use clone mode the only time I really use clone is when I make a backup of a game(need to keep the codes intact).
I also use DVD5 a lot of times when the movie is not so great but is a good one anyway, which then I use Movie Only mode and cut out all the junk like menu, sub-pictures(Sub-titles) and previews so I can increase the quality level of the output.
I try and backup with no less then 80%most of the time BUT I have did some backups with the quality level as low as 65% and found that the picture quality during playback was still very good using DVDFab Platinum

Tim :bigsmile:


#5

I agree Tim. Using Fab, I’ve even gotten down as low as 54% without any noticable flaws in the visual of the back up. I usually use the full disk mode, the wife likes to watch the behind the scenes stuff. Again, my eyes have diffenently seen the glory, if you know what I mean, LOL. Good Luck ~ Mike


#6

I agree with you Tim & Mike on this however the lowest I have gotten was at 53% compression and still the was no noticeable difference between the orig. & back up copy, I also use full ,and movie only because I don’t want all the stuff on the disk just the movie. But each to their own I guess :bigsmile:
Jim


#7

Tim, Mike and Jim have all given you some good help on making this choice, now I will confuse you further with even more.:slight_smile: If cost and processing time are no object (and image quality is), then I would backup to DLs every time. The question of whether you see compression artifacts in the output depends on several things, the most important being the bit rate and quality of the original disc and the size of the screen on which you will watch the backup. If you are doing backups for a car player or small TV compress to 60% quality and put everything on SLs; if a 1080p display is in your future (or your living room) DLs and no compression are the way to go. My notebook has a hi-res display (17" 1440x900) and I can see compression with the Quality at 80-85% with some source material (but I am very picky about quality). On the Clone vs. Full Disc; you might want to read the brief descriptions of these modes here. Clone makes a good copy (and does remove region restrictions) and if you want the entire disc anyway that is what I would use. Clone, however, by its very nature, does not compress. If you want that flexibility, use Full Disc.


#8

Bada Bing…Bada Bang…Bada Boom!
Absolutely agree with signals.
Everyone is making good points…playback is very much dependent on a number of things…bitrate, screen resolution and size, media, dvd player, etc., etc.,
and Mike…loved the comment ~ older eyes…hadn’t thought of that one, but I should have… :bigsmile:

One item worth repeating:
I use clone mode a lot, region code as well as other copy protections are removed. The original layer break is preserved as all video content is copied. The layer break is not preserved with other modes.

Personally, I don’t compress much below 80 % either…this being dependent on the stuff already mentioned and truth be known…it’s bit arbitrary on my part. With verb DLs being had for $1.50 each (or less and sometimes shipping included) I do quite a few bkups to DLs.
I have gone down to 50-53% without any playback issues even on some video rich flicks, but even I can tell it’s not as sharp (those old eyes again…lol).
TV series discs seem to do ok with a lot of compression.

Tom


#9

Hi Paul
Nice post I would have gone more into detail :smiley: , But I was pressed for time :bow:
Tim


#10

Hey Tim. Never know how much info to give. I have been accused of giving too much, but it saves having to go back for a second dip.:slight_smile:


#11

Hi Tom, I didn’t want to get into the religion thing, so I stopped at glory, LOL, but you got my drift. ‘‘It ain’t easy being me.’’ That’s another one that applies too. Good ol’ Rodney, LOL. But seriously, I’ve seen this term used before, layer break, what exactly is it. Some programs keep it and others remove it. I’d like to know more about it and, what it’s purpose is. Thanks guys, ya’ll are real good teachers. ~ Mike


#12

Thanks guys for all your comments. It was helpful.


#13

Hi Mike,

Apologies, didn’t see your question until today…marathon work schedule again… :sad:
The layer break (LB) is the point on the disc when the laser must transition from the 1st layer (0) and refocus to the 2nd layer (1). Recall that that the DL disc is burned from the inside out (like SLs), but then back again. This results in a hesitation which can be anywhere from just about imperceptible to a very noticable pause. I like to draw the analogy of the old Saturday matinee days as kids. You know …when they had to switch reels?. Some of the A-V guys were pretty good at it and some of the not-so-good guys ended up with soda and popcorn thrown at the screen… :bigsmile:
On the original pressed disc, the LB is usually put in a spot…such as a still camera shot…where it will be much less noticable.

As DL burning came into being, there were lottsa issues with the LB. With Fab, we found it was very player and media dependent, other factors played into it as well. Anyway, it seems to be fixed with Fab 3.XXX. I can relocate the LB and while it may be a little more noticable, depending on exactly where in the film it is, I have no playback problems at all.

Hope this helps.

Tom


#14

Boy, I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again, your good. Thanks for the lesson Tom. It makes a whole lotta sense too. AND yes, I do remember them day’s. Also, ther was only one huge screen in the theater too and you’d fight for the first row. Thanks again Tom ~Mike