Cinavia protection on Blu-Ray discs finally broken?

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Cinavia protection finally broken?.

Software developer Pixbytes claim to have broken the Cinavia protection that prevents playback of protected Blu-Rays and DVDs on certain Blu-Ray players by incorporating a watermark that is checked against a key which is part of the AACS protection.

Click to read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/cinavia-protection-finally-broken-63939/](http://www.myce.com/news/cinavia-protection-finally-broken-63939/)

Feel free to add your comments below. 

Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

That is awesome news and looks like it will lead to a full solution once they’ve tweaked it.

I wonder if this is completely non-destructive to the audio though?

[B]Wombler[/B]


#3

I think the solution cannot be non-destructive, as even Cinavia itself isn’t non-destructive. It has to change (destruct) the audio stream in order to add the watermark. However the question is not whether it is destructive or not, but rather if it is possible to hear the difference between the original soundtrack and the modified one.

Found a nice (old) article on audio watermarks today, perhaps it’s worth reading this one.


#4

Yeah that’s a good article.

I’d read that before when researching Cinavia and the likelihood of it being defeated.

IIRC the key difference between these challenges and the Cinavia problem is that no untouched versions of the Cinavia infected audio are available for comparison.

Interesting stuff though and TBH some of the mathematics involved is a bit beyond my limits. :slight_smile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#5

Most copy protections work in obscurity… once people understand how they work, methods can be developed to defeat them. You also can’t put it past this nasty blu ray consortium to use “connected” blu ray players to phone home over the internet if they detect “copied” mediums of which the copyrights/watermarks have been tampered with…

Isn’t it just better to stream content via a HTPC or meida box dedicated for this purpose?


#6

I have to admit that I still prefer physical discs (DVD or Blu-Ray) over mpeg, mp4 or mkv files. DVD and Blu-Ray is something you can play on almost every machine, while I’ve already seen several incompatibilities of other formats on certain devices like MKV file can be played - sound is missing.


#7

[QUOTE=Liggy;2655845]I have to admit that I still prefer physical discs (DVD or Blu-Ray) over mpeg, mp4 or mkv files. DVD and Blu-Ray is something you can play on almost every machine, while I’ve already seen several incompatibilities of other formats on certain devices like MKV file can be played - sound is missing.[/QUOTE]

I am with you here the physical medium is good to have and one can do as they like once they have it and store it or backup much times as needed preserving the original from damage.


#8

If you’re playing shiny discs, then Cinavia is of no concern to you unless those discs are recordable. :wink:


#9

[QUOTE=CDan;2655859]If you’re playing shiny discs, then Cinavia is of no concern to you unless those discs are recordable. ;)[/QUOTE]
Finally someone put this in perspective. Thanks CDan.:wink:


#10

[QUOTE=CDan;2655859]If you’re playing shiny discs, then Cinavia is of no concern to you unless those discs are recordable. ;)[/QUOTE]
But if you’re trying to make a backup so that your children don’t destroy the original of their favourite kids show, cinavia ensures that you’re totally f@#$%d.


#11

[QUOTE=debro;2655882]But if you’re trying to make a backup so that your children don’t destroy the original of their favourite kids show, cinavia ensures that you’re totally f@#$%d.[/QUOTE]

Not necessarily, there are ways around it. It all depends on the player in use. Its FAR too early in the game to make blanket assumptions. Once more players show up that are Cinavia enabled, there will be some reliable data. At present it is possible to rip and avoid issues with Cinavia infected content on some players. Or, just keep a pre-2012 player around that has no Cinavia decoding.

Cinavia is not the apocalypse, it’s just another protection to be worked around.


#12

[QUOTE=Liggy;2655845]I have to admit that I still prefer physical discs (DVD or Blu-Ray) over mpeg, mp4 or mkv files. DVD and Blu-Ray is something you can play on almost every machine, while I’ve already seen several incompatibilities of other formats on certain devices like MKV file can be played - sound is missing.[/QUOTE]

@Liggy,

Now that Optiarc is leaving the optical drive business, what does the future hold for you? Shift your attention to firmware mods on another brand? Or possibly something more extreme, like a move into console hacking, apple device jail breaking etc?


#13

[QUOTE=debro;2655882]But if you’re trying to make a backup so that your children don’t destroy the original of their favourite kids show, cinavia ensures that you’re totally f@#$%d.[/QUOTE]

As the movie companies would suggest, buying another copy of the movie will ensure you have a backup in the event of a disaster :slight_smile:


#14

[QUOTE=FreqNasty_RiseS;2655920]Now that Optiarc is leaving the optical drive business, what does the future hold for you? Shift your attention to firmware mods on another brand? Or possibly something more extreme, like a move into console hacking, apple device jail breaking etc?[/QUOTE]
Probably nothing of the above. I often didn’t even find much time to do the firmware patching and my skills are far away from being good enough to shift to some even more complicated hacking. But that’s a little off-topic here


#15

[QUOTE=CDan;2655903]Not necessarily, there are ways around it. It all depends on the player in use. Its FAR too early in the game to make blanket assumptions. Once more players show up that are Cinavia enabled, there will be some reliable data. At present it is possible to rip and avoid issues with Cinavia infected content on some players. Or, just keep a pre-2012 player around that has no Cinavia decoding.

Cinavia is not the apocalypse, it’s just another protection to be worked around.[/QUOTE]

I’m lucky enough to have a player that isn’t capable of supporting Cinavia and will therefore remain immune but that’s not a future proof solution as I’ll eventually want to upgrade or probably even sooner buy another player for another room in the house.

I’d rather not be left in the future with a pile of expensive backups that won’t play on a newer player, so even though I’m not currently affected, removing Cinavia seems like a pretty good idea to me.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#16

It’s also good to note that only a minority of titles have Cinavia protection. Currently only Sony is using it extensively and most studios are avoiding it due to its cost. Warner has released a few. Other studios like Lionsgate are investing in other copy protections. Ultimately the bottom line will drive studios toward or away from Cinavia, so one can always vote with one’s wallet.


#17

Cinavia took 10 years to develop but far less time to break.


#18

[QUOTE=FreqNasty_RiseS;2655959]Cinavia took 10 years to develop but far less time to break.[/QUOTE]

True but it’s taking longer and longer to break evermore sophisticated protection systems.

Also it remains to be seen if new Cinavia variants will appear that beat this currently proposed solution.

It’s still a major breakthough though and will hopefully have broken this protection for good.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#19

Freq, it reminds me of King George’s stamp tax, meant to raise about $20k. The colonists boycotted British ships and quickly cost the King’s coffers about $100k. The Parliament, under the wise advise of merchants, repealed the stamp tax. King G did it again, and the same results, only quicker and steaper losses resulted. Again, the Parliament repealed it. On the third try, the King sent troops into the colonies to force new taxes. This added at least $50k a year to the project, and by 1781, the King had spent several hundred thousand, lost thousands of lives, was ridiculed by the French, Dutch and Spanish, and lost his colonies, too. All for $20k - way to stay focused, Kingie.

Tuchman’s THE MARCH OF FOLLY has a lot more. I have to wonder when FollyWare will become the latest genre.


#20

[QUOTE=CDan;2655949]It’s also good to note that only a minority of titles have Cinavia protection. Currently only Sony is using it extensively and most studios are avoiding it due to its cost. Warner has released a few. Other studios like Lionsgate are investing in other copy protections. Ultimately the bottom line will drive studios toward or away from Cinavia, so one can always vote with one’s wallet.[/QUOTE]

Plus if Cinavia has been broken then other studios won’t buy into that technology anyway. :iagree:

[B]Wombler[/B]