Cinavia copy protection broken with opensource software

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news Cinavia copy protection broken with opensource software
[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2012/11/myce-logo-cinavia2.png[/newsimage]
[quote][/quote]
Read the full article here:http://www.myce.com/?post_type=news&p=67808

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Degrades the audio quality? There’s an understatement! :bigsmile:


#3

I don’t have a Cinavia DVD Player so I cannot check but I would love to hear from some others.


#4

Great job, maybe we can all find a way to make the audio better while the protection remains gone!!!


#5

Nothing “removes” the Cinavia watermark. What this does is completely decimate the dynamic range and noise floor, rendering the Cinavia watermark non-functional. Its by no means anything you should be calling a breakthrough, the protection has not been broken. This is a sledgehammer for killing mosquitoes.


#6

I have an even better Idea on how to beat cinivia… don’t buy anything with this protection in the first place. Perhaps that will send corporate Hollywood a message: that we don’t like being unable to make backup copies of our legally acquired movies.


#7

Seems to me like it’s basically a less sophisticated and therefore less effective version of the method used in the samples posted by DVDRangerTester.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#8

I guess if you wanted to keep the audio quality in tact, you could remux the bluray, copy it to a HD & hook that HD to a media playing device (eg. WD TV Media Player).

Been working great so far, keeps all my bluray’s from being lost, ruined, broken, written on, slobbered on, etc when the relatives visit with the younglings.


#9

I don’t know how much of a price tag you can put on " your personal time" but I for one am not going to spend one minute on this Cinavia crap, I just bought a great Oppo, albeit an older version that will not detect Cinavia so I can play and back up any movies I want with no problems. Cinavia is a protection put on a dying investment (DVDs) , in a year or so everything will be Streaming for .99 a movie and you can watch whenever and wherever you please. So this whole Cinavia debacle is mute as far as I am concerned.:wink:


#10

Streaming may be the way things go but I will probably keep using DVDs.
As well as conversions to other formats stored on a harddrive.
I still don’t plan to but anything blu-ray unless I have to.
So far I have just a regular single dock that works well with my main TV.
There is a small loading between .vobs if I just leave a DVD rip as is.
I may eventually get something like the WD Media player if I ever need to or rig up a HTPC .
My problem with streaming is bandwidth . I don’t have enough . I could pay more & get just barely enough . (If I actually get the advertised top speed & not the usual below in the “up to” speed .I have DSL .
Still if enough connections stream with cable internet it is my understanding that streaming might not work as well for it either. If everyone goes to streaming video that may be a problem.
If the internet ever becomes reasonably priced for high speed & everyone can get that the streaming may replace DVDs or hard drive stored media.


#11

I think the key thing is circumventing the detection routines rather than removing Cinavia.

We already know it’s possible to subtly alter the audio to achieve this as the post by DVDRangerTester confirms so perhaps someone will use this to pick up on the theories behind the Cinavia plugin and develop their own version.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#12

[QUOTE=Wombler;2692647]I think the key thing is circumventing the detection routines rather than removing Cinavia.

We already know it’s possible to subtly alter the audio to achieve this as the post by DVDRangerTester confirms so perhaps someone will use this to pick up on the theories behind the Cinavia plugin and develop their own version.

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]

There’s a lack of understanding of how Cinavia works, and what the watermark actually is. You can’t remove the watermark, it just can’t be done. What you CAN do is mask it or render it non-functional by altering the S/N ratios in the audio. It’s not subtle at all, it decimates the audio in several ways and certainly renders any benefits from lossless BD audio useless.

An analogy would be to remove a video watermark by degrading the video to the point that the watermark is no longer visible. Why would you even want to do that?


#13

[QUOTE=CDan;2692655]There’s a lack of understanding of how Cinavia works, and what the watermark actually is. You can’t remove the watermark, it just can’t be done. What you CAN do is mask it or render it non-functional by altering the S/N ratios in the audio. It’s not subtle at all, it decimates the audio in several ways and certainly renders any benefits from lossless BD audio useless.

An analogy would be to remove a video watermark by degrading the video to the point that the watermark is no longer visible. Why would you even want to do that?[/QUOTE]

Exactly and I reckon it’s impossible to remove without substantially degrading the audio.

Adjusting the signal to noise ratios isn’t the answer either because, as you say, it decimates the audio.

Did you watch the clips uploaded by DVDRangerTester though as I didn’t notice any problems with audio quality?

The secret is in the difference between these two clips. :wink:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#14

I’m with you Alan1476, I have 2 older Pannys that are not encumber by Cinavia. I’m afraid to update the FW, but so far there has been no need to.


#15

It sill think “Cinavia” sounds like some nasty STD.