CDs are longer lasting than DVDs?

What about those “archival grade” dvds? JVC has photo grade, gold, and verbatim has datalife plus.

Goit,

IIRC JVC “Archival Grade” DVDs are infact rebadged Taiyo Yuden discs since Taiyo Yuden bought out JVC optical media department back in 2009 in hopes that it would achieve mainstream shelves.

But to answer your initial question, blank CD-Rs last longer, much longer, than blank DVD-Rs for two reasons. The first of which is CD-Rs have been around much longer than what DVDs have, and over the years CD-Rs have matured enough to become very stable now and in that sense, more reliable. (The CD has been around since 1982 - The DVD since 1997)

The DVD is a newer technology and as such hasn’t matured as much. The laser writes to DVD-R and CD-R quite differently, and their structural soundness is different as well. Like DVDs CD’s are commercially pressed. CD-R / DVD-R record into grooves and pits by burning spots in the dye. But, since a DVD can hold five times more than a CD, 10 time as much on a DL disc, the pits are much much smaller, and so need more burning precision to get accurate. That’s why a scratched DVD can’t be watchable, but a scratched CD-R can be listenable.

Of course dyes now come into play where longitivity is concerned. RitekG05 is reported to be a really badly produced dye. RitekF1 dye is reported to be excellent, though. So it does matter how well the disc is put together; those with lots of glow and low end branded discs are supposed to be worser off than the expensive discs (Arita vs Verbatim, for example)

Thanks. So is there a particular brand of CDs or burner that I should use?

Don’t use double layer dvds for archival use.

What about single files (rar) larger than 4gb?

It’s not neccisarily so much about what brand is best, because Club MyCE is littered with such threads, but what dye the brand of disc is using.

Many members seem to want to avoid CMC* and anything made by Ritek* (Whilst they do accept RitekF1** is a damn good dye for reliabilty) because the quality and consistency is too sporadic to be able to recommend. Some users of the Ritek G05**, possibly one of the worst dyes ever made, have had flawless results which are still holding up, whilst others have had nothing but problems with them.

Such low quality blanks doesn’t make it ideal for archival use - Such discs are designed to be giveaways. We can talk all day long over what brand to use but brands have a tendency to switch dyes, so you might get a pack of goodies and a pack of baddies in the next. Memorex is a classic example.

Even Verbatim is starting to become a little bit erratic now, and users are slowly being switched off. The only brand now even worth thinking about archiving is Taiyo Yuden, which can be got in bulk or now under the JVC brand name :slight_smile: (TY bought out their disc production department :wink: )

As to what burner… I still use a Phillips burner which was salvaged from a crappy Packard Bell iMedia 1308 computer to this date, which must be at least six years old now. I’ve not had one problem with that drive what so ever, it’s disc reading is good, it’s burning excellent, and this drive even managed to have recovered successfully DVD videos using k3b when the original got corrupted from using sh*tty media :stuck_out_tongue:

What do I recommend? Phillips, all the way. Sadly their burners are no longer to be found, but I’ve found bargain basement OEM burners work excellently too, the likes from Samsung and LG :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=Chad_Bronson;2587447]
As to what burner… I still use a Phillips burner which was salvaged from a crappy Packard Bell iMedia 1308 computer to this date, which must be at least six years old now. I’ve not had one problem with that drive what so ever, it’s disc reading is good, it’s burning excellent, and this drive even managed to have recovered successfully DVD videos using k3b when the original got corrupted from using sh*tty media :p[/QUOTE]

You don’t give much info to even go on for the rest to know what was the cause and fix. Using a old drive to do backup or archival is problematic at best. At that time it was good but there are other drive that are newer and would more then do the job correctly. Not only that but be able to detect, read and burn to the newer media.

Whoops, I forgot to add my model number :doh:

It is a Phillips DVDR1628P1 :slight_smile: It burns to 16x media excellently as well - But I think it had it’s firmware updated in 2006. Even then that’s still an old burner :slight_smile:

So even for CDs not every brand is good?

The flat answer is no, because the manufacturing process can vary wildly from spindle to spindle, and manufacturer to manufacturer. Remember as with all forms of media they are not ideally archival grade media - For example archival graded media might last significantly longer than those without, but there is no guarentee that they will last more than two decades for instance - Burners and discs have only been relatively inexpensive and available to the consumers for the past 15 years, which for archiving, isn’t very long.

HOWEVER, DVDs are a lot more finicky over burning because their pits are smaller, and (particularly for CD-R in an increasingly competative market) disc production have got so good that even supermarket discs can be very reliable. I have no reason to believe that my Tesco CD-R, manufactured by UmeDisc, would fail any time soon, by which time it is likely I would have done away with optical discs :slight_smile:

So which brand’s CDRs are the best? All I see are DVD recommendations here. Verbatim has a super expensive gold ultralife series.

When it comes to DVD recommendations the same can usually be applied over in their CD-R department as well. Ordinary Verbatims are supposed to be good; But about CD-Rs, all of my everyday CD-Rs are produced by CMC, but I’ve had nothing but good result from Plasmon based discs (Which are usually produced by UmeDisc, so manufacturers like AOne, Tesco, etc) not had one consistent failure from a disc - The only failures I’ve had are from this dodgy Sony CDRW drive in an old Dell laptop :slight_smile:

UmeDisc might not be well known, but their discs aren’t bad. As to the best is anyone’s guess, I would vouch, purely because everyone else does, on Verbatim, but as they say, your mileage may vary :slight_smile:

Do the “gold” disks actually last longer and are more resistant to scratches?

In theory, yes, because gold takes some time to oxidise/degrade (due to it’s metallic properties), certainly much slower than than your average Joe disc, but I hear, not that I’m wanting to spread rumours, they can be a little funky with readers. Only way to find out is to test them :slight_smile:

Have you tried Fuji photo discs?

No, aren’t “photo” disks just ones with printable labels?

The verbatim gold CDRs are pretty expensive, so I thought that they should be the best because Verbatim is a reputable company and doesn’t really sell snake oil.