CD-R Verbatim AZO Crystal: greasy crystal surface layer

vbimport

#1

Hi,

I’ve just received a 25-spindle of CD-R Verbatim AZO Crystal (Made in India) directly from the official Verbatim online shop in Europe and I’ve noticed the following issue: if I touch the crystal surface layer with clean hands, my fingers always leave marks on it. Moreover these fingertips proved impossible to wipe off. My hypothesis is that the crystal surface is covered with some greasy coating.

I had already experienced this issue with the same product some months ago. Instead the Verbatim AZO Crystal discs I purchased before 2014 don’t show this problem.

What you think about it? Is it safe to use these discs to archive important data?

Thanks


#2

Verbatim’s Crystal top coating has always shown fingerprints. I don’t find them any worse at showing fingerprints than any other silver-topped CD-R (maybe even slightly better). But they are a bit more difficult to remove. Try a good quality microfiber cloth, and maybe moisten the disc surface slightly by breathing on it.

I love them though. Best non-printable disc surface ever! The surface is a bit like some inkjet photo paper and seems to absorb the ink, which makes it much easier to write on with a fine marker pen and smudge resistant. It also offers superb protection (I’ve seen far too many unbranded TY with the reflective layer flaking off or with pin holes).

The surface shouldn’t feel greasy though. It will feel different to other plain silver CD-R (a bit like some porous ceramic inkjet papers), but if you think it is greasy on a new disc which hasn’t been handled then I urge you to contact Verbatim Europe. (Maybe there is a manufacturing fault and the coating hasn’t set properly?)

As for long-term data storage: Verbatim DataLife Plus / AZO CD-R (mostly Made in India by Moser Baer) have been my standard choice for over a decade and I have had no degradation issues at all. But I don’t buy them any more. Since 2009 I have had too many problems with the quality - in particular visible dust spots in the dye layer (which result in clusters of E22 when scanned). So far this hasn’t affected their longevity and I may try them again. The quality of Moser Baer made Verbatim DVD+R has improved in the last couple of years. And so has Verbatim Europe’s customer service - earlier this year they actually replied to an e-mail. (For the first time in 5 years!)


#3

In my experience, Verbatim AZO Crystal CD-Rs get fingertips only if you touch them with dirty hands. Instead the discs I’ve just purchased get fingertips (on the crystal top layer) when I touch them with clean hands! Verbatim Europe told me that they are investigating the issue but I think they don’t really care about it. In fact CD-Rs are an obsolete technology and their quality is getting worse year after year…


#4

[QUOTE=cervantes;2741256]In fact CD-Rs are an obsolete technology…[/QUOTE]
I hope not.:eek: Today the postman delivered another 150 to add to my stockpile. (No idea how big it is now, somewhere in excess of 1000 top quality discs & a few hundred lesser ones. :D)

I intend to be using CDs for some time to come. There is [I]nothing[/I] in the pipeline to replace optical discs for offline storage, and CDs are large enough for most of my needs.


#5

[QUOTE=Ibex;2741265]I hope not.:eek: Today the postman delivered another 150 to add to my stockpile. (No idea how big it is now, somewhere in excess of 1000 top quality discs & a few hundred lesser ones. :D)

I intend to be using CDs for some time to come. There is [I]nothing[/I] in the pipeline to replace optical discs for offline storage, and CDs are large enough for most of my needs.[/QUOTE]

I agree about optical storage for archiving, not trusting magnetic or flash for long term and online storage isn’t the same as having access to one’s important data forever. However, I’d suggest the upcoming Mdisk as the eventual solution for long term because data is etched into a hard layer instead of merely burned to an organic layer. Hopefully now that Imation has entered into a deal with the Mdisk’s developer, we’ll see this technology become commonplace.