CD Doctor Question

Ive just bought a Sony CRX220A1 (Lite-On LTR 52246) and have been playing with CD Doctor.

Is it best to test the media at 8x, or to check the max read speed box?

Pretty much all media I’ve tried has low error rates at 8x, but at full speed I get quite a few c1/c2 errors with pressed audio cds and cdrs burned with my Sony. CDR’s burned with my Teac W524E seem to have much fewer errors when tested at the max read speed (maybe due to the reduced burning speed?).

Is it normal to have quite significantly higher c1 & c2 errors when testing at max read speed?

Also, during testing at the max speed the drive tends to spin up/down quite a lot.

Any input from more knowledgable people?

Cheers,
-dave

I talked with rdgrimes about this a while back, and both of us have been using max speed. A few reasons I could think of are:

  • 8x takes too long

  • When you copy from a data or audio CD, the speed is always max unless you’re in EAC or something.

  • If the spin down occurs when testing, it’ll probably occur when reading from the CD at other times. Heads up, your burn is crap.

  • Many burns have low error rates at 8x, so full speed makes it easier to differentiate the good from the bad.

Hope this helps.

> I talked with rdgrimes about this a while back, and both of us
> have been using max speed. A few reasons I could think of are:

> * 8x takes too long

Fair enough.

> * When you copy from a data or audio CD, the speed is always > max unless you’re in EAC or something.

True.

> * If the spin down occurs when testing, it’ll probably occur
> when reading from the CD at other times. Heads up, your burn > is crap.

I doubt the burn is crap. They’ve been done in my Sony (Lite-On) and my Teac W524E and using the best available media (Taiyo Yuden, Mitsui… ) and the errors also occur with original pressed audio cd’s that I have just bought and are in perfect condition.

The problem is also intermittent. One test run is fine, the next has errors… it’s pretty strange.

Any input greatly appreciated!

-dave

  • Many burns have low error rates at 8x, so full speed makes it easier to differentiate the good from the bad.

Hope this helps.