Cd cleaners

vbimport

#1

I need to know if I can use eye glass cleaner to clean my cd’s


#2

I would imagine that a cleaner for eyeglasses has to be mild enough not to effect plastic lenses found in many newer forms of eyewear these days, so it should probably be fine.

You could save money by using a 50/50 mix of water and isopropyl alcohol on a soft cloth. Don’t drench the cd, just use enough to pick up dust and dirt. Blow off any loose debris before starting to clean the cd and don’t rub round and round the disk. Clean from the center to the outside edge.


#3

Good advice as usual there Kerry. :iagree:

Isopropyl alcohol and methylated spririts are the the two solvents recommended in the standards for archival collections as they are mild solvents, they will not dissolve polycarbonate and they evaporate quickly.

Of the two of them I prefer methylated spirits as it’s cheaper here and easier to obtain but either will do.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#4

Odd differences in what is available. Here in the states, isopropyl alcohol is available at any drugstore or grocery store. Methylated spirits is called denatured alcohol, and is only available at hardware stores. It is usually used as a solvent for shellac, and is much more expensive than isopropyl.


#5

Yeah it is rather strange that. :iagree:

Isopropyl alcohol tends to be more of a specialist product here whereas methylated spirit is used for all sorts of stuff and as well as the obvious DIY stores, I can get it off the shelf in supermarkets (large grocery stores) or even my local village shop.

That comment re the shellac takes me back a bit though.

My grandfather was a ship’s carpenter at the famous Harland & Wolff shipyard where they built the Titanic and he taught me how to french polish, the proper way, with shellac dissolved in methylated spirit and cloths dabbed with linseed oil.

It’s a dying art and I suspect very few people would bother with it nowadays but the finish you get after several coats beats any out of the tin product hands down.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#6

I’ve read about the french polish process but never tried it.
Most would be suprised at what shellac is made from.
The only time I ever used any was to match where shellac had been used before.


#7

Isopropyl is commonly sold here in the US because Isopropyl is a byproduct of the petroleum refining industry.

It is sold most commonly at 80% (diluted with water) as "rubbing alcohol"
which is actually used more as a topical disinfected.

But can be found at department stores and auto parts stores as "DryGas"
in it’s anhydrous form (for absorbing water contamination from fuel)

But be aware that the cheaper “Dry gas” substitutes Methanol which is a somewhat more agressive solvent (and is also corrosive), and is a less effect water absorbent for petroleum fuels because methanol is not entirely soluble in gasoline. so READ THE LABEL before buying

“Methylated spirits” as the Brits call it or “Denatured Alcohol” is a byproduct of the distillation industry, which is literally poisoned to make it tax exempt.

while none of the alcohols are particularly agressive solvents I find liquid dishwashing soap & water cleans the discs to remove finger schmutz as well or better as any actual solvent, with a lower risk of damaging the discs.

Especially since alcohols are not particularly effective degreasers
and those solvents that are good degreasers tend also to be contact
solvents for most common plastics.

AD


#8

[QUOTE=basslady;2607051]I need to know if I can use eye glass cleaner to clean my cd’s[/QUOTE]

I had no problems using eye glass cleaner to clean my cd/dvd media read side surfaces with no problems but rubbing alcohol does work good but remember to use a soft 3m cloth or similar so as to not scratch or do more damage then what the dirt or smudges your trying to remove from the readable media layer. For those tough stains on the read side a little rubbing alcohol and cottony swap used gently will help remove stubborn stains. This is what I used to help so my dvd/bd can read and rip or access better to determine if it was a bad dvd/bd or bad drive or another problem.


#9

Most would be suprised at what shellac is made from.

The ‘shell’ of the ‘lac’ beetle, as I recall…http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shellac


#10

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2607147]while none of the alcohols are particularly agressive solvents I find liquid dishwashing soap & water cleans the discs to remove finger schmutz as well or better as any actual solvent, with a lower risk of damaging the discs.

Especially since alcohols are not particularly effective degreasers
and those solvents that are good degreasers tend also to be contact
solvents for most common plastics.

AD
[/QUOTE]

Plain old soap and water often does the trick. :iagree:

The two solvents I’d mentioned are recommended for use by archivists, based on scientific testing by the National Institute of Standards & Technology.

Archivists in national libraries etc have exceptionally strict standards which is why I’m always happy to recommend these as the preferred methods.

TBH I find methylated spirit is particularly effective at removing greasy marks and fingerprints.

It can remove the ‘permanent’ ink used in a lot of CD/DVD labelling pens and it can also remove certain types of adhesive that can wrongly find their way onto the disc during various packaging processes.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#11

Most of the time I just use a micro fiber cloth dry by itself. The cloth is washable so if a disc is really dirty I can hand wash the cloth.
Our water here is hard so some distilled water on this cloth has removed anything else I needed cleaned off the disc.
Good to know about the methylated spirit & ink . I never use ink on a disc but occasionally get a used disc that has been inked. I think the last time I used some methylated spirits (denatured alcohol) was to remove wax build up on a hardwood floor.


#12

[QUOTE=Wombler;2607207]Plain old soap and water often does the trick. :iagree:

The two solvents I’d mentioned are recommended for use by archivists, based on scientific testing by the National Institute of Standards & Technology.

Archivists in national libraries etc have exceptionally strict standards which is why I’m always happy to recommend these as the preferred methods.

TBH I find methylated spirit is particularly effective at removing greasy marks and fingerprints.

It can remove the ‘permanent’ ink used in a lot of CD/DVD labelling pens and it can also remove certain types of adhesive that can wrongly find their way onto the disc during various packaging processes.

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]

One thing I was suprised to discover was that while some of the stain from some inks was removeable by methanol and that some is removeable by ethanol.

While neither is a particularly strong solvent there are components in inks that are actually soluble only in one or the other.

What I find works best on adhesives is Fast Orange hand cleaner the kind WITHOUT pumice for obvious reasons as it is in a jelly form it tends to stay where you put it.

AD


#13

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2607266]One thing I was suprised to discover was that while some of the stain from some inks was removeable by methanol and that some is removeable by ethanol.

While neither is a particularly strong solvent there are components in inks that are actually soluble only in one or the other.

What I find works best on adhesives is Fast Orange hand cleaner the kind WITHOUT pumice for obvious reasons as it is in a jelly form it tends to stay where you put it.

AD[/QUOTE]

You can’t easily get ethanol here but I’d noticed the same thing with methylated spirits and naptha which is a petroleum based distillate.

It seems to be that residues of any the commonly used adhesives can be removed with one or the other of these and occasionally they’ll both work.

I wouldn’t recommend naptha for DVD use though. :bigsmile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#14

I’ve never used naptha on a DVD . It has become hard to come by here .
A local full service gas station used to keep a barrel to sell Naptha from but it went out of business.
Full service gas stations are fairly scarce . Self-serve is great for price but it sure killed the local full service stations.
The one that had the Naptha also had kerosene the same way. I still have a couple of old kerosene lamps in case the electricity goes off . Now I just buy a plastic bottled quart from walmart . Usually I use my Coleman lantern though.
With the drought I didn’t have to use it this year.

I’ve never used Turpentine for a DVD either . Has anyone tested it ?


#15

I have occasionally used Lighter fluid (sold for “Zippo” type lighters) to remove some persistant gunk that alcohol wouldn’t work on…

Kerosene works but the usual commercial form is smelly (but generally inexpensive compared to any strong ethanol)

What doesn’t stink is bad is the High flashpoint de-odorized form of kerosene sold at hardware stores as “Mineral spirits”

“Coleman fuel” (which is essentially Naptha) can make a good low residue cleaning solvent but as it has a low flashpoint and a high vapor pressure it isn’t the safest stuff to work with in more than “eye dropper” quantities

Coleman fuel’s main advantage is availability.


#16

[QUOTE=cholla;2607379]I’ve never used Turpentine for a DVD either . Has anyone tested it ?[/QUOTE]

It’s not worth the risk IMO.

Although other solvents may clean the disc you’re running the risk of either direct damage to the polycarbonate or some of the solvent migrating into the disc and causing eventual clouding or accelerating longer term deterioration.

I’m not sure about turpentine (and I’ve no plans on trying it) but I know that acetone and benzene will dissolve polycarbonate.

[B]@Allan[/B] - The naptha that I use here is sold as lighter fluid. :iagree:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#18

[QUOTE=phatgirl18;2608732]They are selling CD cleaners for a cheaper price than eyeglass cleaner. I guess it is better to get the proper one. :)[/QUOTE]

There is always that option. :bigsmile:

[B]Wombler[/B]