CCI reveals details of 'six strikes' anti-piracy system

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article CCI reveals details of ‘six strikes’ anti-piracy system.

The Center for Copyright Information (CCI) reveals details of controversial ‘six strikes’ anti-piracy measures

Click to read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/cci-reveals-details-of-six-strikes-anti-piracy-system-64879/](http://www.myce.com/news/cci-reveals-details-of-six-strikes-anti-piracy-system-64879/)

Feel free to add your comments below. 

Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

A couple of questions here…

The first two times are just letters. So why not just download like crazy until you receive two letters? I mean people know they are only going to be warned two times to start, so why not just keep doing it until you receive those two ‘warnings?’

On step three, it says it takes you to a landing page where you have to admit guilt. Aren’t there legal issues involved in that here in the USA? Is it a legally binding thing? Do I get to refuse to accept guilt, and continue using my internet? What happens if you are falsely accused, now you’ve admitted guilt, but are not actually guilty? The Fourth step does the same thing, and I again, raise the same questions.

Also, do these rules re-apply each time you change subscribers? So let’s say you get caught on AT&T, get your two warnings, then decide to go sign up for a different subscriber. Does the system re-start and you get your two letters, then go sign up for a different subscriber and just keep repeating the cycle so that you never reach step three?

This system is stupid, to say the least.


#3

The whole system is crazy and can be bypassed very easily by knowledgeable users so I think the practicalities of operating it have been very low on their list of priorities.

As ever the RIAA and MPAA are more interested in implementing controls of any sort rather than examining the legal niceties in detail. :rolleyes:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#4

Why oh why companies are selling out to RIAA and MPAA, I’ll never know. Sheesh - [B][I]Mein Kampf [/I][/B]has a more far-sighted strategy.


#5

[QUOTE=hogger129;2664702]On step three, it says it takes you to a landing page where you have to admit guilt. Aren’t there legal issues involved in that here in the USA? Is it a legally binding thing? Do I get to refuse to accept guilt, and continue using my internet? What happens if you are falsely accused, now you’ve admitted guilt, but are not actually guilty? The Fourth step does the same thing, and I again, raise the same questions.[/QUOTE]

I wonder if the ISP will tell the RIAA/MPAA that a subscriber refuses to admit guilt and that they will no longer police them. It will be up to the RIAA/MPAA etc. to prosecute them from that point on.

If the subscriber admits guilt then they can be terminated for further action as the burden of proof is eliminated. I don’t see any way that an ISP would take on the liability of termination based on something the RIAA/MPAA tells them when the subscriber says they are innocent. If they do then they are in for a rude awakening in the court system.

I think this is a way the RIAA/MPAA thinks they can scare a huge number of people into not downloading. IMO, this will fail, and backfire, just like all their previous attempts have done.


#6

Another Question is, Is there some kind of time frame for re-setting this system? Do all these strikes have to occur within six months, a year , 2 years, etc? Or, like if you have zero incidents for a year does it reset?


#7

What I also want to know is why the IPSs haven’t sent letters to all their customers detailing this new policy. I would think that this is a change to their TOS and legally they have to notify people accordingly.