Carbon TVs aim to overcome the drawbacks of Plasma and LCD

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Carbon TVs aim to overcome the drawbacks of Plasma and LCD.

  When  choosing  a large thin TV there are several technologies, but each type has its  drawbacks,                 whether it is viewing angle, screen burn, weight, depth, contrast ratio, ...
Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/9699-Carbon-TVs-aim-to-overcome-the-drawbacks-of-Plasma-and-LCD.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/9699-Carbon-TVs-aim-to-overcome-the-drawbacks-of-Plasma-and-LCD.html)

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#2

all this talk of new display technologies is exciting. I hope we get some more choice out there soon (love low-power displays in particular)


#3

I’ll take two 80" Carbon TVs please for $99 each. It’s the only way to view my DVD3 movies as I can’t stand watching them in anything less than 6400x4800 non interlaced.


#4

Only 6400x4800, I thought you’d at least be viewing at 20,600x19,800… Maybe you’re just running some new fangled technology eh? :+


#5

if its as good as CRT… then i’ll get one for my PC… and my tv… i’ll pack no more than 4 g’s for it cuz im tite like that :d I wonder how well we can watch pr0n w/ that :d Or the wire behind Bush when he was in the 1st presidential debate w/ Kerry :d


#6

“As the anode is positively charged, it attracts the electrons produced and emits light once they strike the phosphors like in a CRT.” This part of the technology is still affected by magnetic fields and therefore makes it a bit pointless. CRT’s suffer from focus problems, one thing I love about LCD’s is their sharp focus. Obviously this carbon technology is promising, it looks like its going to go head to head with OLED as well as other ones.


#7

I don’t think the focus issue will be as bad with carbon TV due to how close the electron emitters are to the phosphors (1mm to 2mm). In a CRT, the electrons must travel quite a distance from the emitter to the screen which means stray magnetic fields are likely to cause more distortion or affect the colour hue. Then again, LCD’s still have the edge on sharpness. Either way, it will be interesting to see what the actual displays will be like. :wink:


#8

all we need to do know is get rid of the stealth tax i mean tv licence here in the uk and we are all laughing:B


#9

Boolsheet. OLED is future.


#10

Their short life has them constrained to devices that don’t normally have the display on for long hours like cameras & phones. They still haven’t figured out how to make them last long enough for devices like monitors and TVs that are on for hours at a time. Which is why we still haven’t seen OLED technology in these devices; big problems yet to be solved.


#11

it’s the blue material thats causing the problem. I believe they have already increased the blue to 5,000 hours (from 1,000?) and we’re bound to see that increase soon.


#12

I’m sure there will be a PC monitor version also. As a PC monitor is not a television, no TV license is required if the only screen you have is your PC monitor and your PC does not have a TV tuner. :wink: While I was at college, one mate I knew was happy watching DVD rentals on the PC. Over a year the TV license inspector came twice, however all the inspector was interested in checking was that no VCR, TV or TV antenna was present in any room.


#13

I didn’t know the “SED” still exists?!? LOL PS. Probably only germans will understand that joke. The race continues. Who will win this time?


#14

Will this (Carbon TV’s) produce a similar radiation effect as CRT’s? One thing that I like about LCD’s is that unlike CRT’s, my eyes don’t feel strained after typing for a few hours of work (or watching tv…).