Canon unveils their first straight to DVD camcorders

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Canon unveils their first straight to DVD camcorders.

Canon has announced that they have designed and are about to release, a couple straight-to-DVD camcorders. These DC10 and DC20 models are Canons very first effort using this method…

Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/10646-Canon-unveils-their-first-straight-to-DVD-camcorders.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/10646-Canon-unveils-their-first-straight-to-DVD-camcorders.html)

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Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

It’s long overdue… The average home user doesn’t know how to or want to import video into their computer, edit it, burn it (assuming they even have a burner) to DVD and hope their DVD player can play the disc. The only way diginal camcorders will reach mass consumption is by burning directly to DVD. Sony was the first company to realize this, I’m glad to see some competition is popping up. Now the market will balange itself out and we’ll see more affordable cameras and mini DVDr dscs.


#3

true, but DVD is limited on bandwidth. Recording directly to tape means you can have uncompressed data!


#4

I would wait until mini-bluray discs come to the market. Now that will be something to wait for. minidv has a bandwidth of about 23mbs where as dvd is 10 max. So yes you loose out on a lot of “info” going direct to dvd.


#5

I say give the public what they want :g most of them just want a way of playing them back on there tv without having to hook there cams up to it. :S


#6

mini bluray disc’s will be sweet. I expect it to be somewhere around 8-10gig’s so that means either you have a lot of reg video storage or you can move to hd dv’s and have some sweetness. Think 10 gigs of space for a 1080i video captured in mpeg4. Only thing that needs to happen is raw cpu power needs to increase. I mean your talking about running atleast a chip inside that has the power of most 2ghz cpu’s have these days. Then your talking about a hardware encoder that compresses mpeg4 on the fly. Last you need a bluray disc burner that will keep up with all this data being pushed out (which shouldn’t be to much i mean 60min per 8-10gig disc so 60min to burn 8-10gig’s sounds easy to do)


#7

What I want is a 20 gig drive or larger instead of using tape.


#8

The idea seems nice, but it records to DVD using MPEG2 (a compressed format), not that easy to edit and with no advantage over avi that you can edit and ger on DVD as MPEG2 using better encoders. It may be easier but that’s it. When you get blu-ray video will be HD and requiring a much powerfull encoder in the camera to get the files ready to read in a DVD player… Maybe the final support ends up being a very different one, not tape nor DVD discs.


#9

It’s also expensive buying mini-discs which can fit only so much, and yet again, the editing is the issue. It’s difficult to edit- and usually results in recompressing an already compressed source - making it worse. They are power-hungry and slower than tape, I still think tape format is better.


#10

Tape is always great but as said not everyone know’s how to deal with tapes. And since most commercials promoted the whole “home editing” thing then they are going to have to pony up on it. I can see though they might start doing with mpeg4 is kinda like tape that is seperate each time you turn on and off the camera into seperate files/chapters. This will make it as easy as dv tapes to edit. Also we arn’t talking about dvd playback here when we are using bluray or hd-dvd’s we are talking about keeping it at the high res content. I mean if you bought a hd camera i am sure you would want a hd tv to watch it on right?