Can I trust this hard drive?

I have a hitachi 160 gig hard drive that recently began to fail. I ran the hitachi hard drive tools and repaired the bad sectors (marked them as bad I assume) and now the drive seems to be working so far. I lost about 8 meg of capacity, which isn’t a lot out of 160 gig but its seems to be a lot to go bad. Of course there is some coruption so I’ll have to reinstall windows. So here is my question.

Every time I have had a hard drive fail (not that often), it has suddenly or quicklly died (completlly dead). If the drive doesn’t come up with any more bad sectors, can I really trust this drive anymore? It has a 3 year warranty but I havent found my reciept yet (it might still be under warranty).
Has anyone had some sectors go bad on a drive, and continued to use the drive without problems for a long period of time (after marking sectors of course)?

I have one I’m using on a folding machine. It has been running 24/7 for about a year now. Of course there is nothing important on it. It is a 30 Gig maxtor with roughly 4-5 meg bad. Any more problems out of it and I will replace it with a Seagate (5 year warranty).

Hi,

Was this a real hardware issue? Please check http://support.microsoft.com/kb/303013

Every time I have had a hard drive fail (not that often), it has suddenly or quicklly died (completlly dead). If the drive doesn’t come up with any more bad sectors, can I really trust this drive anymore?
I wouldn’t trust this drive any more, maybe you can use it as secondary drive for unimportant data. Also check the drive’s temperature regularly, as high temperatures decrease lifetime drastically.

It has a 3 year warranty but I havent found my reciept yet (it might still be under warranty).
Some manufacturers accept warranty claims without the reciept. You might provide serial # and date of manufacturing. So it is worth checking Hitachi website.

Michael

The app has just re-allocated the bad sectors or in this case killed them off, personally I would not trust it, I would only use it a a spare or in a folder. Have you tried a low level format, then another run with the hitachi tools?

I would personally cut my losses, I wouldn’t risk any important data on it. Maybe use it as a “workhorse” drive, with stuff that doesn’t matter should it become corrupted/lost.

At the end of the day it might be a worthy doorstop…

I had an 80 gig Seagate earlier this year, which I had to remap a few bad sectors on with Seagate’s util.

I didn’t keep the drive, but got a new one (also Seagate, running like clockwork), and gave it to my neighbour. As far as I know, the drive’s causing him no problems several months on.

My neighbour is using my old one as a slave to his “important” drive, so I’d agree with Chriso and keep it for non-important (or backed up elsewhere) data.

Failing that, you could always take a hammer to it, as my ex and his friend did with a messed up WD :bigsmile:

I’ve had one drive that developed bad sectors and that continued working flawlessly after those sectors were marked bad. This is the exception, however.

Usually a harddrive will develop more and more bad sectors and then die. This can happen slowly or really fast. The last harddrive I had that got bad sectors died within a couple of hours after the first bad sector was detected.

And S.M.A.R.T. never warned me before the day it happened. :rolleyes:

As others have said I would copy my data elsewhere and stop using this drive.

Hitachi? They took over the IBM Deathstar line, didn’t they?

My experience, with a friend’s notebook drive (Travelstar 80GN model)…
It bad sectored enough to cause a complete system failure - didn’t have any tools to recover the data, if anything was recoverable.

The utility was able to revector all the bad sectors, but it failed again within a couple of weeks. The middle of the drive, where the MFT would be placed, was aabout the worst, full of slows - didn’t survive another attempt.

One utility to look out for is MHDD32 - scanning with that can warn of sectors which are slow, generally meaning “success with retry” - if a drive shows a lot of those slows, then it is likely to get worse, though a successful revector might also appear as a “slow”.

It looks like the date of manufacture is within the three year warranty so maybe I got lucky on the timing if I cannot find my reciept. Still it was a little disapointing as I thought these were good drives. They have been kept nice and cool with an 80mm fan mounted in the front of the drive cage so heat wasn’t an issue. The thing that really sucks is that they were part of a raid pair (though not currnetly in a raid). If what I get as a warranty replacment doesn’t match up, I could be hosed there.

On the funny side of things, here’s a little suggestion:

On a serious note, they may be able to sort you out with a matching pair (if you’re fussy enough on the phone). I guess you can only try with this sort of thing, but you get nothing if you don’t ask.