Can a faulty DVD Writer cause a PC Freeze?

vbimport

#1

My system setup:

AMD 64 3200+ (skt 939)
ASUS A8V-VM SE
1GB DDR RAM
XFX GeForce 6600 Vanilla PCIE (256 MB)
Windows XP Pro SP2

I don’t know what I did… ( I reset the CMOS battery on my mobo…)
After around one minute from booting into XP , my system freezes…
What could be the issue ??
And the next time, on startup, Scandisk comes and stops at 6% in one of my drives (bad sectors?? )

I was suspecting my HDD at first, so i tried on a new HDD with a different Windows XP CD. After an hour or so, the same freezing problem… :a
So, the HDD is ruled out! :clap:

This means… The problem is either with :

  1. Memory (RAM)
    OR
  2. SMPS …
    OR
    3. My DVD-RW drive… I cross flashed the BIOS on it…
    It doesn’t seem to work now. Could that be a problem?? I’ve disconnected it and am trying now…

Seems, I’m seriously screwed … :sad:

PS: BIOS tuning/optimizing isn’t needed at all, that isn’t my problem!


#2

Test your RAM with a testing utility like memtest86.

Check the PSU voltages in the BIOS setup.

Check your CPU temperature.

Try a live bootable CD like Damn Small Linux or Knoppix to see is the system is stable when you are not using Windows.


#3

i doubt the bad flash of your burner got anything to do with it but worth a try i guess , did you try loading optimal/setup defaults in bios?, make sure all drives are jumperd & connected properly, its best to avoid CS (cable select) jumper settings and use master/slave only , also be aware that it matters what connector on the ide cable goes where… lets say this is an ide cable
1----2----3
connector 1 (blue) - goes to the motherboard ide socket
connector 2 (grey) - goes to the slave drive
connector 3 (black) - goes to the master drive
so as you can see the secondary connector should go the slave drive and third to the master drive , these color coding apply to all 80 wires ide cables, on 40 wires ide cables all the connectors are black but the principle is still same…

if the the drives are jumpered & connected properly , and loading optimal/setup defaults in bios didnt fix it , then try this,power off and unplug the power cord from the psu (power supply) , open up the case and take out the cmos battery , keep it that way for 1 hour then re-insert the battery & plug the cord and power up , after that enter the bios and load optimal/setup defaults (have a good look on the battery before taking it out,notice the + or - sign thats ontop of it , when youll re-insert it you must put it just the way it was,if youll put it on the wrong side it will damage the motherboard)

if the problem remains after doing the above , then i’d say the problem must be one of these

  1. unstable psu (power supply)
  2. bad video card
  3. bad motherboard

[U]how to figure out which one of the 3 is the problem:[/U]
psu - enter the bios and get into pc health/hardware monitoring there youll see the voltages , write em down on paper & give em on a reply and ill tell you if they are stable , another (and more accurate) way to get the
voltages is to measure em using a digital multimeter so if you have one use it , heres some guides
http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/showthread.php?t=137886
http://www.driverheaven.net/guides/testingPSU/

video card - open the case and lay it on the side,power up and see if its fan spins , unfortunatly there isnt a way to test it 100% so even if the fan spins it doesnt have to mean its all good

motherboard - check for blown/leaking capacitors ,might wanna use a flashlight too , to know what you should look for,look here
http://home.earthlink.net/~doniteli/index27.htm
http://www.pcstats.com/articleview.cfm?articleID=195

lets see
ram - impossible , bad ram can cause automated restarts/bsods but cannot make it freeze
psu - very possible
processor - unlikely,overheating will make the system shutdown


#4

I wouldn’t say impossible. Just about anything can happen with faulty RAM.

Newer mainboards can be set to shutdown when the CPU temperature exceeds a preset value. The shutdown temperature is usually quite high. IIRC this Foxconn board can be configured to shut down at 70 or 75C. This can be enough to cause problems, especially if the CPU is overclocked. I reckon he should check it on the grounds that it is easy to do and costs nothing :slight_smile:


#5

What exactly should point 3 mean??


#6

No doubt about it.