Can 1080p Movie fit on a DVD-R?

vbimport

#1

Hi, I just bought DVD-Rs that are 4.7Gb that is not dual layer.

I was just wondering would your average 2-3 hour movie at 1080p resolution fit on a DVD-R without any loss of quality?

What about 720p?

Also, my DVD player is a 1080p upconverting player that plays DivX.

What format should I burn my movie in?


#2

A dvd player is normally restricted to dvd resolutions. This means that the resolution of your video file can be no bigger than 720 x 480 (NTSC) or 720 x 576 (PAL). We use NTSC in the US and Canada, but PAL standards are more common around the world.

It doesn’t matter that your dvd player can upscale to 1080p resolutions. The input file has to be within normal dvd boundaries. That is, unless you have a truly exceptional dvd player. I don’t know of [B]any[/B] off the top of my head that can use higher resolution input files.

Blu ray players are a completely different kettle of fish of course. They are designed for larger resolutions.

Now, on to your other question. Blu ray movies of 1080p resolution are normally anywhere from 18 to 40gb in size (movie only). The H264 codec can do some amazing things in compression, and it is possible to fit a 2 hr movie at 1080p onto a single layer dvd, but you cannot do this without some loss of quality. Converting to 720p to fit onto such a small size disk will help, but even it will not be comparable to the original blu ray movie.

If you want to try to compress a regular blu ray movie to such a small size, I recommend a program called BD Rebuilder. There is a guide to using it in my signature. If you are starting with mkv files or mp4 files, you’ll need a different program…something like Ripbot264 or Handbrake.

And you must realize, the high def files will [B]not[/B] play on the vast majority of dvd players.

You can of course convert to regular dvd video using AVStoDVD, but that will not be high def.


#3

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2605266]A dvd player is normally restricted to dvd resolutions. This means that the resolution of your video file can be no bigger than 720 x 480 (NTSC) or 720 x 576 (PAL). We use NTSC in the US and Canada, but PAL standards are more common around the world.

It doesn’t matter that your dvd player can upscale to 1080p resolutions. The input file has to be within normal dvd boundaries. That is, unless you have a truly exceptional dvd player. I don’t know of [B]any[/B] off the top of my head that can use higher resolution input files.

Blu ray players are a completely different kettle of fish of course. They are designed for larger resolutions.

Now, on to your other question. Blu ray movies of 1080p resolution are normally anywhere from 18 to 40gb in size (movie only). The H264 codec can do some amazing things in compression, and it is possible to fit a 2 hr movie at 1080p onto a single layer dvd, but you cannot do this without some loss of quality. Converting to 720p to fit onto such a small size disk will help, but even it will not be comparable to the original blu ray movie.

If you want to try to compress a regular blu ray movie to such a small size, I recommend a program called BD Rebuilder. There is a guide to using it in my signature. If you are starting with mkv files or mp4 files, you’ll need a different program…something like Ripbot264 or Handbrake.

And you must realize, the high def files will [B]not[/B] play on the vast majority of dvd players.

You can of course convert to regular dvd video using AVStoDVD, but that will not be high def.[/QUOTE]

My DVD player is the toshiba DR-7 and it can record and play back 1080p video from my camcorder

So you’re saying that a 1080p movie will not fit onto a single 4.7Gb dvd without loss of quality? And if I do burn it to a 4.7Gb dvd, how much quality will be lost? Will the quality still be better than a 720p video, say maybe even an 864p video?

And since you said that it is possible to burn a 720p movie onto a normal dvd, what container should I use since my dvd player supports DivX?


#4

Does your Toshiba specifically say it has support for AVCHD? If so, that would be a good format for conversion of blu ray 1080p. You can use 1080p or 720p in AVCHD.

But I seriously doubt you have AVCHD support.

[B]HD [/B]Divx allows 720p, but I have no experience with this format and it is not common amongst most of us amateur video enthusiasts. There is a HD Divx converter available for download and it will allow you to make .mkv files for free, but to get the HD Divx output it looks like you need to purchase the Pro version. http://www.divx.com/en/software/divx-plus/converter

Edit: Just noticed your question about a 1080 movie fitting onto a single layer dvd. It all depends on the length of the movie. As I stated before, a two hour movie will fit, but not without loss of quality due to compression. A ten minute movie will fit just fine. Cutting the size down from 1080p to 720p will allow you to put more on a small target disk, but the very act of reducing the video in size will degrade quality to some degree, not to mention the compression needed to put a 2hr high def movie onto a single layer dvd.


#5

According to that there is no HD input for this recorder. It seems to record in standard DVD format.

http://www.toshiba.ca/web/product.grp?lg=en&section=2&group=4&product=8310


#6

Ah, thanks for the help there olyteddy. I tried to look that recorder up earlier, but it isn’t listed on the US site, and the Toshiba site for Canada was having server issues at that time.