C++

vbimport

#1

Will the c + + language in the future development:flower:


#2

GOOD question! I don’t think anyone knows the answer but “NO” is a strong possibility.

But the same could be said for every computer language available today. They are ALL on the verge of death, of being changed into something else.

So C, C++, VisualC - those are valuable skill-sets to have. The computer world used to be divided into neat blocks of FORTRAN and COBOL, with a little BASIC, then PASCAL for weirdos. And ASSEMBLY was always the ‘dirty secret’ that everyone wondered about. l

The FORTRAN and COBOL programmers had an isolated world to live in from 1960 until 2000 (?) with few encroachments. But that’s a long-dead world now and I don’t think programmers will ever ‘keep’ a language for more than a decade. Probably “five years” within a single language will be a long time in the future.

JAVA might push on, just because it’s a convenient front-end language but back-end databases can still be run from C, COBOL, even BASIC. FoxPro is all but gone, although it was on shakey ground to begin with, but that language had 10-15 years’ in it, and there are still small companies that show up with update-needs.

IBM’s RPG (since 1982?) is still around as well - there are billion dollar warehousing companies that use it, even though it’s “development” has been all but dead for the last 15 years.

PERL remains handy for what it does. JAVA will, too. But the ‘real’ languages - at least the skill-set to learn them - will remain longer than perhaps their command-spellings do.


#3

Thank you for your answer


#4

Great answer ChristineBCW and very informative too! :clap:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#5

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2645331]GOOD question! I don’t think anyone knows the answer but “NO” is a strong possibility.

\

The FORTRAN and COBOL programmers had an isolated world to live in from 1960 until 2000 (?) with few encroachments. But that’s a long-dead world now and I don’t think programmers will ever ‘keep’ a language for more than a decade. Probably “five years” within a single language will be a long time in the future.

IBM’s RPG (since 1982?) is still around as well - there are billion dollar warehousing companies that use it, even though it’s “development” has been all but dead for the last 15 years.

[/QUOTE]

One should ask what type of programmer you want to be.

COBOL and RPG (since 1959) are far from being dead. If I never wrote another C/C++ program I could live quite comfortably coding in COBOL and/or RPG, which are the first two languages I learned, FORTRAN and Assembler came later. I’m primarily a business applications programmer where COBOL and RPG are still heavily used, but not if you are a systems programmer, game coder, web developer, write compilers, or any of hundreds of different areas where different code skills are required.


#6

Having thought about the future of programming languages a bit more I believe that if I were just starting out I would spend 100% of my energy learning to code for the web and nothing else. That is where future opportunities lie. For example, I’ve coded for mainframes, pc’s, and everything in between since I started but I’d be hard pressed to write a decent web app whereas my youngest brother never wrote a line of “programming code” in his life but can do just about anything with HTML, PHP, JavaScript, CSS, Flash, etc and makes a good living at it. Just my two farthings.


#7

Zhjun, do you realize I’ve just insulted Whappo? Well, I halfway meant to since my programming company does battle with THOSE types!! ha ha… we’re into servers and blades, and RPG-COBOL is still the land of AS/400s and whatever else is out there.

BUT Whappo’s several points are completely true. Even “dead” languages have futures. RPG (the language first appearing I think on IBM Sys1’s? Then Sys34-36-38 and moving into AS400s even though IBM originally said, “No, only COBOL, a new C, etc” but even IBM relented and ported RPG over - their customer base made far too much money from RPG programming and simply couldn’t re-learn/re-do everything.

The Walmarts of the world still depend on RPG. Banking systems still have huge COBOL back-rooms. The notion of the cute, hot current languages is great for the press and gaining new tuition dollars, but in the Real World, “who’s making money with what” IS the real question to ask.

Whappo brings up the ‘front-end’ languages and how many people are making a fine living (currently and into the foreseeable future) using those.

Yet, as we hear more about “cloud” mythology, every mainframe programmer and operator in the world knows “Oh boy, we’re going back to 1980 and time-sharing computer services off of some Big-Iron computer system!”

For school-degrees, I’d push people into learning One Structured Language and One Object Language. Those graduates will be ‘stuck’ in companies that use those MAYBE, but the skills of learning Any Language are what’s important - not One or The Other.

Thanks to Whappo for bringing up these issues. We go in and pillage AS400-HP shops, replacing them with ‘servers’ and ‘blades’ but we all know it’s pretty much the same thing, in the end. The ability to use a new vocabulary is so important - but it’s also important to have gained the experience to learn the RIGHT vocabulary at the right time. Nothing but experience teaches that.