Buying New TV

[qanda]This thread is about the Toshiba 37 HD Ready LCD TV. Click here to see full specs[/qanda]Boy, purchasing a TVs is a whole lot harder than it use to be.

I want a 37" HD TV, though I really don’t know what brand. What I want to check out is the concept of paying extra to have a TV calibrated. I was told that manufacturers calibrate the torch as high as possible from the factory so the picture will catch the buyer’s eye in the store and the sales people don’t have to do anything, just take the TV out of the box. But, the TV will last a lot longer and be easier on the viewer’s eyes if the TV is re-calibrated lower which costs from $200 to $300 dollars paid to highly trained professionals. I was visiting Best Buy. AND, if left un-calibrated, the life of the TV will be less due to the extra heat that is generated by the highest torch.

I think I understand the HZ to mean the higher it is, the less chance one will get a blurr if the scenes are way action packed, ie 60hz or 120hz. (I may be missing a letter in the hz.) Though, the 120Hz setting really being used as yet.

I think I understand that the higher the contrast is, ie 100,00 or 50,000 or 30,000 the sharper the picture for black and white.

I sure would appreciate some guidance on this buying task.

Patt

Hi Patth,

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You don’t need professional calibration to be “be easier on the viewer’s eyes”. Today’s sets have many adjustment options, individual and various presets, Cinema, Vivid etc. To pay almost $300 in hopes that it will make the TV last longer makes no sense to me. Especially when excellent and very reliable Panasonic 42" plasmas can be had for about $650.

I think I understand the HZ to mean the higher it is, the less chance one will get a blurr if the scenes are way action packed, ie 60hz or 120hz. (I may be missing a letter in the hz.) Though, the 120Hz setting really being used as yet.

Get a plasma and none of this matters, as there is no motion lag anyway.

There is also the 1080p vs 720p question. Put in your numbers here and see if your eyes will be able to resolve the difference at your seating distance.

http://myhometheater.homestead.com/viewingdistancecalculator.html

For a 37" set if you sit more that 5 feet away (assuming 20/20 vision) your eyes will not be able to resolve anything over 720p.

if you get plasma you have to deal with the mega glare of the glass screen, I would go 1080p 120hz, if you are ever planning on moving the tv around as many people do when they rearrange, you might want the higher resolution, and the prices are coming down considerably. I got a great deal on a toshiba, lg has good deals too and the quality of their sets is good, they even have a 240 hz tv out now

[QUOTE=Patth9;2407319][qanda]This thread is about the Toshiba 37 HD Ready LCD TV. Click here to see full specs[/qanda]Boy, purchasing a TVs is a whole lot harder than it use to be.

I want a 37" HD TV, though I really don’t know what brand. What I want to check out is the concept of paying extra to have a TV calibrated. I was told that manufacturers calibrate the torch as high as possible from the factory so the picture will catch the buyer’s eye in the store and the sales people don’t have to do anything, just take the TV out of the box. But, the TV will last a lot longer and be easier on the viewer’s eyes if the TV is re-calibrated lower which costs from $200 to $300 dollars paid to highly trained professionals. I was visiting Best Buy. AND, if left un-calibrated, the life of the TV will be less due to the extra heat that is generated by the highest torch.

I think I understand the HZ to mean the higher it is, the less chance one will get a blurr if the scenes are way action packed, ie 60hz or 120hz. (I may be missing a letter in the hz.) Though, the 120Hz setting really being used as yet.

I think I understand that the higher the contrast is, ie 100,00 or 50,000 or 30,000 the sharper the picture for black and white.

I sure would appreciate some guidance on this buying task.

Patt[/QUOTE]
Anything over a contrast ratio of 1000:1 is almost indistinguishable in anything except the darkest room.

Dynamic contrast ratios in LED TV are all hefty image processing, and the real ratios are between 1000:1 & 3000:1 - but they quote 100,000:1 and upwards.

Plasma’s have a native contrast ratio of between 20,000:1 & 50,000:1 and don’t need dynamic contrast ratios. They just look good.

All TV’s have a glass panel at the front. Glare is permanent, except in the darkest rooms (no lights, all walls/surfaces pitch black). Turn of all bright lights, and close the curtains on windows.

200/240Hz TV’s haven’t been proven to provide any real benefit to viewers compared to 100/120Hz TV’s.
100/120Hz TV’s have been proven to have better picture quality over non 100/120Hz TV’s in the same brand.
All the 100/120Hz does is insert a black frame between real frames, which basically resets the LCD pixels. Plasma’s do not need 100/120Hz. I’d laugh if someone released a 100/120Hz plasma model.

I’m not sure how a calibration makes it last longer :confused: Just set the TV to a lower brightness, and it might extend the longevity of the LED/Fluorescent light source Maybe or reduce the wear on the plasma gas (how?). You’d be better off spending your $300 dollar on an extended warranty. But the extended warranties are pretty much a white elephant, because TV’s last longer than 5yrs. You’d be pretty unlucky for your TV to break down within 5 years, and accidental damage is not covered anyway :iagree:
Just turn your TV off when you’re not using it. Every TV has an energy saver option anyway - it’ll reduce your power bill a tad :wink:

WOW everyone, I really appreciate the feedback, and the newbie help. Now we have amo with which to go hunting.:bow:

Patt