Burning mp3s - folders and track-numbers?

Another newbie question! If I successfully burn 100 or so mp3 music tracks as a data CD to play in my car stereo (see my separate post on that aspect), can I use folders to ensure that the tracks play in a particular order?

I’ve seen it suggested in another thread that by default the tracks are played in alphabetical or numerical order. So a simple way to organise a playlist on a CD containing 100 mp3s would be to “rename” all the tracks by adding a number from 001 to 100 before each track title.

But is it possible to have the tracks in folders corresponding to the original albums from which they came?

And if so how does one number, or label, the folders and the tracks so that they can be identified in the (relatively basic) display of a car stereo? For example, if I have tracks from Allman Brothers, Byrds, and Crosby Stills & Nash albums, how do I label or number them so that - say - I can play all the Byrds tracks, then the Allmans, then CSN? Do I have to title the folders as 1 - Byrds, 2-Allmans, and 3- CSN - and if so how do I label, or number, the tracks within each of the folders?

Apologies if this sounds idiot-basic - but it would be good to know how others deal with this “playlist” issue.

br1anstorm

Yup, as you like and your player supports it.

Make subfolders, put the albums in there arnd name them 01 - 99 as you like.

I use WinAmp to manage my music collection and a plug-in called ‘PlayList UnPacker’ to add ‘PL001, PL002 … PLXXX’ to the filename to keep them in order.

[QUOTE=chef;1970849]Yup, as you like and your player supports it.

Make subfolders, put the albums in there arnd name them 01 - 99 as you like.[/QUOTE]

Thanks for these replies. I’m still struggling to get a clean and finalised burn of mp3s on to a CDR (see my separate post in this forum) with a simple collection of mp3 tracks numbered 001 - 103 totalling some 520 MB.

So I’m not yet ready to attempt a burn with tracks in folders or sub-folders. but just to clarify, chef, do you number the albums [U]and[/U] the tracks inside each one? If so how exactly does this work? Is it

first folder: 1 - album title - track 01, track 02 etc inside it, then
second folder: 2 - album title - track 01, track 02 etc and so on

or do you have to number the tracks in the second and subsequent album folders sequentially after the first (so if Album 1 has 12 tracks, Album 2 has to start with a track numbered 13… )?

or do you have to number the tracks inside each album-folder as 1-01, 1-02 etc and then 2-01, 2-02 etc.?

Hope this doesn’t sound too complicated, but I’d like to set up a logical system of album and track numbering which works both for me and for the computer!

br1anstorm

You can just name them like:

folder:
01-artist-album

files inside:
01-artist-title1.mp3
02-artist-title2.mp3
and so on.

Justall of them alphabetically sorted.

Thanks chef.

Once I’ve figured out how to get a decently-burned disk which just has a collection of unsorted mp3 tracks on it and will play in any deck or drive, (I’m hoping for help on that in separate thread) then I’ll move on to experimenting with sorting and numbering the tracks in folders…

Ths burning business is less straightforward than I expected. I’ve burned disks with ‘normal’ audio tracks with no pain at all, so I can’t understand why I’m having such grief over burning disks containing mp3s!

br1anstorm

Because AudioCDs can only hold max 99 titles, DataCDs or DataDVDs can hold up to some hundred mp3…

The blank disks I am using are regular data CDs, not the special digital audio ones.

Do you mean that it is not possible to record a “Jukebox CD” (which is an option in the Audio part of Sonic RecordNow) with more than 99 mp3 tracks?

I recorded a total of 103 mp3 tracks, totalling only some 520MB, as a “jukebox CD” - and it is this disk which won’t play in my computer, but will play in my stereo decks (which are CD-MP3 compatible) with clicks and skips.

So… should I try (a) to record a “jukebox” (audio…) CD with fewer than 99 tracks? or (b) re-record the 103 tracks, but as a data CD?

br1anstorm

Regular CDDA is limited to 99 audiotracks, but you could use indexes, or hidden tracks etc.

chef… I appreciate your prompt replies (we’re getting into a conversation here!). But I’m getting a little confused.

There are lots of posts on this forum from people who say they record up to 140 or more mp3 tracks on to a CDR to play in the car. If I recall correctly, some actually say they make “jukebox” audio disks with over 100 mp3s on them.

So is it in fact the case that if you want to have more than 99 tracks (whatever the actual size of the mp3 files) on a CD, then you [U]have[/U] to record it as a [B]data[/B] CD?

br1anstorm

There might be huge differences in the specifications of the mp3 format, the disc, your writer and the standalone player that you actually use to play them in.

mp3 : various encoding methods (vbr, etc), stereo, joint stereo, etc.
disc: 650, 700mb, writing strategies
files: various lengths and extensions of files possible.

Always take things from the perspective of the device you are going to use them on, in this case your car stereo.

car stereo:

  • What kind of mp3’s can it handle?
  • Does it accept playlists, id tags (which ones) or folder schematics
  • Does it accept cd-r 700mb?
  • What writing formats does it accept? Iso 9660?

mp3 files are data files. They should be written on a data cd. If you use an audio cd, the software probably automatically converts your mp3 files to an audio cd. And yes, 99 tracks is the maximum of an audio cd. (Well you could hack another 99 more, but that’s a little technical and not easy to listen to)

Most modern car stereos (mine’s a Sony of 2007) can handle almost anything.

Yup, the 99 track limit is for AudioCD / CDDA, not for DataCDs or DataDVDs holding mp3.

Thanks, chef and Mr B, for your helpful info.

I’m searching for the manual for my car stereo to see how much detail it offers on the type of mp3s/playlists/tags etc it can handle. But I suspect it won’t say much more than that it can play CD-MP3s!

I confess I’m still a little unclear when people refer to “audio CDs” - because as I understand it this description could apply to various different items:

  1. there are blank CDRs which are specifically marketed and sold as being for music recording, and they have a special “digital audio” logo on them. Some hifi CD recording decks (like my Philips 765) can [U]only[/U] record on to these discs, and can’t record to ordinary CDRs sold for computer use;

  2. a standard CDR with uncompressed audio tracks recorded on to it by a computer programme such as Roxio or Nero or Sonic from an original music CD album could be described as an “audio CD”;

  3. and I suppose a standard CDR which has had mp3 (or .wma or similar) music files or tracks recorded on to it [U]might[/U] also be described as an “audio CD” (since audio is what you get when you play it!).

But if Mr B is correct and mp3s are data files, then is a disk of mp3 or wma files recorded as a jukebox CD in Sonic’s “audio” programme a data CD with no limit on track numbers, or an audio CD with a 99 track limit?

I’m sure someone will clarify all this for me!

br1anstorm

The difference is in the book. A book standaard is a certain rule setting which describes how the cd should be written and how it should be read.

Red Book is the standard for audio CDs (Compact Disc Digital Audio system, or CDDA). It is named after one of a set of color-bound books that contain the technical specifications for all CD and CD-ROM formats. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Book_(audio_CD_standard). In this format you can put up to 80 minutes of stereo music at a 44.1KHz rate on a cd. This is not a wav. file, but it could be converted to a wave file by a special extraction program.

The Yellow Book is the standard that defines the format of CD-ROMs. mp3 files are files. data. So therefore you need to write them on a data cd.

Most blank cd’s can be written in any book form, but to read them you require compatible reading interfaces.

So, if your car stereo can deal with data cd’s (yellow book) next to audio cd’s (red book) and can deal with the mp3 format, you’re probably safe.

Just try to make a 600 mb data cd-rom with a lot of mp3’s on them and pop it in your car stereo to test.

I don’t know the Sonic product, since i use Nero, which easily describes what it’s doing.

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;1972536]
[…]
mp3 files are files. data. So therefore you need to write them on a data cd.

Most blank cd’s can be written in any book form, but to read them you require compatible reading interfaces.

So, if your car stereo can deal with data cd’s (yellow book) next to audio cd’s (red book) and can deal with the mp3 format, you’re probably safe.

Just try to make a 600 mb data cd-rom with a lot of mp3’s on them and pop it in your car stereo to test.

I don’t know the Sonic product, since i use Nero, which easily describes what it’s doing.[/QUOTE]

Thanks, Mr B, this makes things clearer. I’m about to try and do what you suggest, as a test.

Part of my confusion arises from the fact that in the Sonic programme, it offers four project categories - audio, data, backup and video.

Under [U]audio[/U], there are three options: 1) burn an audio CD for car or home CD player; 2) make an exact copy of an existing (music?) disc in your collection; or 3) [I]create a jukebox CD to play in your computer or MP3, WMA or WAV player[/I].

Then under [U]data[/U], it offers either 1) [I]create or add to a data disc[/I], or 2) make an exact copy of a (data) disc in your collection.

So to record a disc of mp3s to play in the car, I have to choose between the two options shown in italics. So far, I’ve tried both. Neither has produced a disc which plays in my computer, and the ‘jukebox’ audio CD plays only in my home stereo, with lots of skips squeaks chirps and clicks.

I don’t know if it’s relevant, but I’ve checked the settings for burning. The default for [B]audio[/B] discs is “[B]DAO, closed[/B]”, and for [B]data[/B] discs, “[B]TAO, open[/B]”. Does this make a difference to whether the burned discs will play and in what drives? Should I change these settings, and if so, to what?

If someone can point me to a user-friendly tutorial guide that gives advice on the settings, speeds and the burning process, then I’d be happy to do some more homework and research myself rather than relying on the patience and generosity of experts answering my basic questions in a forum!!!

br1anstorm

DAO is the best option for CDDA to not having pauses between audio tracks.
For data you can use any mode, TAO, SAO, DAO.

[QUOTE=br1anstorm;1972593]Thanks, Mr B, this makes things clearer. I’m about to try and do what you suggest, as a test.

Part of my confusion arises from the fact that in the Sonic programme, it offers four project categories - audio, data, backup and video.

Under [U]audio[/U], there are three options: 1) burn an audio CD for car or home CD player; 2) make an exact copy of an existing (music?) disc in your collection; or 3) [I]create a jukebox CD to play in your computer or MP3, WMA or WAV player[/I].

Then under [U]data[/U], it offers either 1) [I]create or add to a data disc[/I], or 2) make an exact copy of a (data) disc in your collection.
[/quote]

Just use “create data disc”. Nothing more, nothing less.

Drag all the mp3 files to the new data disc compilation, make sure it’s a single session, disc closed (DAO closed) and it should produce a nice normal clean data disc full of mp3’s.